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Full text of "Duluth Evening Herald"


ACRES 

Near Short Line Park on railroad. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 ;West Superior Street. 



Minn. Hlstoreal Society 

DULUTH 




EVENING HERALD. 




FOK BARGAINS 



E. C. HOLLIDAY, 



326 W. Superior Street. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILDING. 



VOL. 7; NO. 250. 



DULUTH, MINN., THU BSD AY, JANUAKY 23, 1890. 



PBICS: THBEE CENTS. 



IN THE eiGHT DIRECTION UNO yOO WILL HUKE MONEY. 



U 



ill 



tr 



WE HAVE THEM TO SELL! 



HERE IS A SAMPLE! 

Southwest quarter of northwest quarter Section 
18-50-14, $130 per acre. Land within 1-4 
mile sold about 6 months ago for $225 per 
acre and held now at $300 per acre. The 
building of the Incline Railroad by the High- 
land Improvement Co. will make this land 
worth $200 per acre. 



HERE'S ANOTHER. 

Southeast quarter Section 15-50-15 at $40 per 
acre. Acres in Northeast quarter Section 
I 4-50- 1 5 just sold for $65 per acre. 




SOME SPECIAL BARGAINS IN LOTS IN DU- 
LUTH PROPER. CALL OR WRITE. 



A. 



MONEY TO LOAN! 



•a* o-r^— » 



/ 



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I »• 



MORTGAGES BOUGHT! 



NO DELAY— MONEY ON HAND! 



*f 



Applications wanted at once, especially for 
$500, $800, $ I 000, $ I 500, $2000, $2400. 



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Stryker, Manley & Buck 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



SIXTEENTH 



Semi-Sfinual Red Figure Mart Oown Sale I 



One of the pleasing siglits of our store is to see how the 
Ladies are nnaking us« of our popular RED FIGURE SALE by 
purchasing Suits and Overcoats for the Little Folks at actual 
cost prices. Such a variety as you might expect if you had 
half a dozen prices to consider instead of but one. 

Some at cost prices; some a little less than cost. 

No matter what they are, any of them at Red Figure Prices. 





^f^(/m 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



A Necktie, Alttiougfi Kouf Bosom Companion, is Also a Tale 

Bearef of Kouf Tastes. 



Please bear in mind that MONDAY, JAN. 27, 
we will make prices sell one of the best assorted 
stocks of FINE NECKWEAR in the city. 

Due notice will be given other lines which are 
to be sold proportionately low. 



I 



KILGORE &. SIEWERT 

Fine Hats and Men's Furnishings. 
ST. LOUIS HOTEL BLOCK, DULUTH. 
Store closes at 6:30 P. M. 



C. H. GRAVES & CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1869. 



REAL 



ESTATE. 



* 



\ 



We have a large list of choice Residence Lots, Acres, Business and Dock 
Property, of which we have exclusive control. 

-:- LOANS. -:- 

We negotiate loans in any annount on improved city property, and for par- 
ties wishing to build, at the lowest current rates of interest. 

INSURANCE. 

Our list of companies comprise some of the oldest and largest in exist- 
ance. We give special attention to the careful writing of policies and prompt 
and fair settlement of all losses. 



ROOMS 2, 3 AND 4, BOARD OF TRADE BLOQ, DULUTH. MINN. 



II 



4 



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LIST EDITION. 



IRE LOOKING FOE IRON. 



Representatives of Englishmen 

on the Iron Range 

Today. 



Stated to be Looking Over 

Properties That Are 

Offered 



With a Possibility of Trying 

to Place Them in 

England. 



The Vermilion range has long offered 
a field for the investment of immense 
amounts of capital. The iron deposits 
are practically inexhaustible, and with 
full development of the various mines, 
this region could control the price and 
output of Bessemer ore for the entire 
United States. 

English capital, seeking remunerative 
investment in this countrj, has long been 

directed by local owners to this wealth of 
iron, and negotiations for the trans- 
fer of ditTerent iron lands in the 
Vermilion to English syndicate.s 
have been At various times opened and 
even carried on for months and at very 
considerable expense, but have all fallen 
through from one cause or another. 
Sometime ago a syndicate from across 
the water sounded the Minnesota Iron 
company's property, but failed to buy. 
Long negotiations were carried on with 
the Consolidated Vermilion Iron com- 
pany, but they also failed. Others are 
now in progress. But notwithstanding 
these repeated failures, the English 
"promoters" of organizations have never 
given up hope of securing capital and a 
foothold in the range, and to this end 
a syndicate of London capitalists are 
now working. 

Yesterday an agent of the syndicate 
registered in Duluth, and today, in 
company with several Duluth 
iron men, left for Tower, 

Ely and other parts of the iron range. 
All the Duluthians with whom the agent 
has been seen, deny all knowledge of his 
intentions, sayiug that he is "merely 
looking over the country." The agent 
himself will say nothing regarding the 
object of his visit here, but that it is in 
connection with the purchase of iron 
lands is learned from what may 
be called good authority. As yet 
the various English companies 
that have purchased industries 
and invested in securities in this county 
have had little to do with the mines, ex- 
cept to buy paying stocks in western 
gold mines, though one company has 
bought Minnesota mining property. 
The purchase of ( Jogebic property was a 
new departure for English investment, 
and the stated negotiations for these 
Vermilion properties seems like an at- 
tempt to gain a strong interest in the 
Lake Superior region. The silver mines 
near Port Arthur and along the north 
shore have been partially developed by 
British gold, and to British money Port 
Arthur owes what prosperity it has. 

There is no question but the invest- 
ment of English capital to the amount 
of S1.UOC),000, or even several times that 
sum. in the Vermilion would aid won- 
derfully in its development, and aid to a 
wonderful degree the prosperity and 
growth of Duluth. Everj- dollar put 
into the Vermilion range means aid to 
Duluth's commerce and jobbing trade, 
and should this contemplated deal go 
through, there will be very soon a second 
railroad to the range. 



White Caps in Bad Luck. 

Shelbyville, Ind., Jan. 23. — Last 
week Whit« Caps visited the home of 
Edgar Elliot at (Jwynville, this county, 
intending to run him and his wife away 
from town. The Elliots were not at 
home, and the mob destroyed the con 
tents of their house. Next night they 
tried to catch him at the house of a 
neighbor, but were thwarted. Eliot, 
however, has left the place. Theotlicers 
today arrested thirteen men, mostly 
young and of prominent families, on sus- 
picion of being White Caps. They all 
gave bonds for appearance at trial next 
Saturday. No cause for the attack on 
Elliot has been made known. 



Tlte West Kn<l .Scandals. 
LoNiX)N, Jan. 23. — The defense in the 
case of Newton, Taylorsen and Degall, 
charged with conspiring to defeat justice 
in connection with the West End scan- 
dal, was opened today. Gill, who ap- 
peared for the accused, commented 
upon the {xjlice and government for 
allowing Hammond, proprietor of the 
Cleveland street house, to escape, and 
for taking young scoundrels at night 
around to club houses to whisper men's 
characters away and for otfering Newton 
a sacrifice ta^tone the public for police 
delay. T ha^ risoners were committed 
for trial. THey were subsequently ad- 
mitted to bail in the sum of £100 each. 

Census Supervisors. 

Washington, Jan. 2.3. -The President 
today sent to the senate the following 
nominations: Interior To be euper- 
visors of census, Oreg<m — John H. Shupe, 
1st; J. W. Strange, 2nd. Washingt<jn— 
Will D. Jenkins, 1st. South Dakota— 
Chaa. W. Mather, 2nd. Wisconsin — 
Luther B. Noyes, ith. Minnesota- 
Edward J. Davenport, 2nd; Elmer E. 
Adams, 4th. 



TEN W ERE W EDDED. 

Five Pairs of Hearts Made Joyful by One 
Wedding Ceremony. 

LoiTisvn.LE, Ky., Jan. 23.— A quin- 
tuple wedding took place in St Alpnon- 
80S Catholic church, in Daviess county, 
Tuesday. All the young people are 
Catholics and live on farms in Daviess 
county. By a coincidence they are all 
neighlxjrs and intimate friends. The 
parish priest. Father W. P. McCarthy, 
officiated. The five brides, all dressed 
alike, came in one carriage and the five 
grooms in another. There were ushers, 
but CO bridesmaids, there would have 
been so many that they would have been 
in each others way. 



Charles A. Golden, the barber of 348 
Lake avenue, has sold today to Otto E. 
Sengebusch of L'Anse, Mich., for the 
consideration of $200. Mr. (rolden will 
leave on Sunday evening for Seattle, 
Washington state. May success follow 
him. Give the new barber a trial. 



ALASKA S EAL FISHERIES. 

Time For Preaenting Bids Extended a 
.Mouth by Order of Secretary Windom. 

WAsiiiNOTOJi, Jan. 23.— The bids for 
the privilege of taking fur seals up<m 
the islands of St. Paul and St. (Jeorge, 
Alaska, will not be opened tomorrow 
morning, the date originally set by Sec- 
retary Windom. Instead another month 
wiU be allowed to those who desire to 
enter the lists for the competition. 

For a score of years the Alaska Com- 
mercial company has held a monopoly 
of this contract, and it would doubtless 
have continued to do so had it not been 
for the earnest protest of ex-Governor 
Swyieford of Alaska, who declared that 
the government could have §750,000 an- 
nually from the seal fisheries just as eas- 
ily as' the $370,lX)0 it now receives. 

Impressed by this statement Secre 
tary Windom has decided tti extend the 
time within which bids might be re- 
ceived in order that men of means and 
enterprise desiring to enter into compe- 
tition with the Commercial company 
might do so with their eyes oijen. 



Indian river oranges at Victor Huot's. 



SENATE COM MERCE COMMITTEE. 

Its I'robable Action us to tlie Collector of 
the Port of Chicago. 

Washington, Jan. 2:1— This is the 
regular meeting day of the senate com- 
mittee on commerce, and a good deal of 
interest is manifested in its probable 
action on the nomination of John M. 
Clark as collector of the port of Chicago. 
This nomination has been strongly an- 
tagonized by Senator Farwell, whose 
candidate was rejected by the President 
in favor of Clark, the latter being the 
favorite of George M. Pullman and Sam 
W. AUerton, the cattle magnate, and 
l)oth of whom contributed liberally to 
the campaign fund of the lepublican 
party at the last Presidential election. 

Senator Farwell is very popular on 
both sides of the senate chamber, and 
there is little doubt but that, if he is so 
dispoe^L he can procure the "hanging 
up" oAfft nomination. Whether he will 
go to this extreme will largely depend 
URpn the attitude of the c-ommittee, 
which meets this afternoon. 



A $100,000 FIRE. 

Boston hail a bad Blaze; Five men Se- 
verely Injuretl. 

Boston, Jan. 23.— The four-story brick 
block, Nos. 65 to 101 Bristol street, owned 
by the heirs of William F. Paul, was 
gutted by fire at an early hour this 
morning. The loss is estimated at $100,- 
000. The occupants were J. G. Paul A 
Co., sawmill and inside furnishings; Cole 
ii Woodbury, piano manufacturers; 
George M. Gould \- Co., church organ 
builders; Henry G. Hogan, sash and 
stair builder; William H. Boardman, 
stair builder; Boston Sewing company 
(machines); Johnson Bros., fancy woods. 
There were about 150 c:irpenters em- 
ployed in the building, all of whom lost 
their tools, valued at fully $15,000. 

The fire was not without its serious 
accidents. Five men were badly injured 
by falling thrdUgh from the roof to the 
fourth floor. EIrwin Bowman was pinned 
down by a piece of shafting for over an 
hour and narrowly escaped drowning in 
the deluge of water poured upon the 
building before his companions tracetl 
him. The others, Capt. Smith, Lieut. 
James Dean, William J. Killion ami 
.Vlbert La.sker, were taken out consider- 
ably bruised. 



ADAM FO REPAU GH DIES. 

The Grip Carries off the Most Kxteusive 
Circus Ownei : His Lite. 

Phil-xdelphia, Jan. 23.— Adam Fore- 
paugh, the veteran circus manager, died 
late last night at his residence in this 
city. Mr. Forepaugh had been ailing 
for some time past. He was attacked a 
week or two ago with the prevailing in- 
fluenza epidemic which three or four 
days ago developed into pneumonia. 

Mr. Forepaugh was originally a 
butcher, but many years ago he em 
barked in the circus business, in which 
he was very successful, getting together 
the most extensive circus and menag- 
erie in the world, with which he amassed 
a fortune which is estimated at more 
than $1,000,000. He was a large real es- 
tate owner. Mr. Forepaugh was OS years 
old. He leaves a wife and one s<jn, 
Adam Jr., who will succeed to his im- 
mense circus property. 



Arrested for His Board Bill. 

New York, Jan. 23. — Baron Joachim 
Charles Schelitra, who is charged with 
defrauding the proprietor of the Madi- 
son Park hotel of five weeks' board for 
himself and wife and $35 in addition, 
was arraigned in Jefferson Market court 
this morning. Friends, however, were 
present to settle the score. The baron, 
who renounced his title to become an 
American citizen, is the husband of 
Miss Frances Bayliss of Chicago. He 
has estates abroad, but claims his re- 
mittances have been delayed. 

The Great Sturau Again. 
Truckee Calif, Jan. 23.— The siorm 
has commenced again. The wind has 
blown a gale all day. At Summit and 
Cisco the snowfall is reported the heavi- 
est of any day since this terrible storm 
began. It was snowing and blowing 
hard on the mountains all last night. 
The snow-plow trains will be kept run- 
ning all night from Summit to the tun 
nel to prevent the blocking of the road, 
if possible. 

Thirty-six Below in WlMronsin. 

Chicago, Jan. 23. — Dispatches from 
many points in Wisconsin, Iowa and 
Illinois report that the mercury yester- 
day reached the lowest point this win- 
ter, ranging in different sections from 
10 to 30 below zero, the latter temper- 
ature being rectirded at Black River 
Falls, Wis. Last evening the weather 
moderated, and heavy snow has fallen 
over a large area. 

The Bohemian Diet. 
Vienna, Jan. 23.— The Bohemian diet 
met today. On Sunday the proto<^!ol 
adopted by the recent Bohemian confer- 
ence will be made public. It is a defeat 
for the Czech element, and will create 
something of a sensation. 



His Health Admirable. 

KoMFvIan. 23. — The rumor widely cur- 
rent that the pope had suddenly died 
proves to have been entirely unfounded. 
His health is admirable. 

REAL ESTATE. 



A Record of the Keal Kstate Transfer* foi 
24 Hoars, Kndlng at Noon. 

H McCullocli to O L Voung, lot 13. block 
9. Londoa • nSO 

Chas W Hoyt to Wni J MorrtsoD. lot 23, 
block 127, West Duluth. Fifth 1, 400 

A W liradley to W H Lynest), block 115, 
West Duluth. Fourth 700 

Ji)9 H Mnnuhcim to (' W IMper, 8!4 of 
8e>* anil iioU of 8t'!4 sec 2-51-14 '.600 

A A Smith to U H Armstrong, luods in 
34-4»-15 3.2B0 

C W Hovt to Andrew Mlckolson, lot 9. 
block hit. West Duluth, Fifth :W 

Helen A Hall to F, 3 Wiirner, eV4 of nw)^ 
iindsw'/4 of uwU. soca>61-12 4,K80 

J I) Howard to S H Walsh, lands In sec- 
tions -£1. SI, 3rt. 27, y,towiiships51-U.... 9,300 

Silas U Walsh to A S (ihase, seV* of sec- 
. tlon 22, sw'* of section 23, nwSi of sec- 
tion 28, and ne>4 of fcotlon 27-16-14 . . . 22.400 

O L Youn(f U) L A Marvin, lot 13, block 
». London ,..,. 5t)0 



II transfers ; consideratlou I60,04M 



MASONS AND POLES. 



The Former Organize a Local 

Chapter of a Most High 

Branch. 



The Latter Strive to Keep 

Alive Their National 

Spirit. 



A chapter of Rose Croix and Council 
of the Kadoeh of the Scottish Kite is to 
be formed in this city at once. A meet- 
ing of the Masonic fraternity was held 
last night for the purpose of forming 
a class in this branch of the 
order, and rooms will be rented 
for this puriK>8e today. Col. 
.'Vdams of Minneapolis, inspector general 
of Minnescjta, is here for the purpose of 
instituting the chapter. A large gather- 
ing of Masons from here and outside 
will meet tonight, when the ceremony 
will take place. The chapter is a higher 
branch of the order from the foundation 
up to the 33rd degree. The officers will 
be instituted tonight. 

The higher branchef of Mas<jnry are 
growing rapidly in Duluth both in num- 
ber and strength and this chapter is a 
notable addition. There are also a great 
many members of the Mystic Shrine in 
Duluth. 

THE POL ES CE LEBRATE. 

I.ast Nif^ht's Ceremonies In Kenteiubrance 
of the Battle of Warsaw. 

The Duluth Polish societies held an 
anniversary celebration last night com- 
memorating the second Warsaw insur- 
rection, which took place in 1863. At 9 
a. m. services were held at the Polish 
Catholic church; in the evening at l.'V) 
there were vesj^rs at the church, after 
which there was a largely-attended meet- 
ing at the school house. 

The meeting was presided over by M. 
Hoppa, who explained the object of the 
gathering, and invited the Polish Har- 
monia Singing scx-iety to render a song. 
Theo. M. Helinski. the orator of the 
evening was then introduced. 

Mr. Helinski started out with a brief 
hittory of the insurrection of 1863, and 
went back to the first partition of Poland. 
The insurrection was the effect of the 
Polish spirit, which ever hopes 
for the restoration of the 
country again. The unhappy position 
of Poland by comparison of other nations 
of Europe, was lucidly explained. The 
unhappy state of the country was elo- 
quently touched upon, one reason given 
being so situated geographically Poland 
was regarded as the gate of Europe, 
through which the wild hordes of Asia 
poured into Europe, and the Poles 
had to sustain the first shock 
and bear the frequent invasions 
of the intruders. Consequently it was 
always necessary to keep an army in the 
field. This is ',»?hy the country is always 
in a disturlxid condition, and hence the 
people were unable to cultivate the arts 
or sciences, or enjoy the same educa- 
tional advantages as the rest of Euroi)e. 
The Poles in this country are generally 
taken by Americans as the representatives 
of the Polish nation. The Polish class of 
citizens here represent mostly the ixwr 
and laboring class. The educated Poles 
very seldom leafe their native country, 
unless they come in contact with the 
government through some interference 
with governmental affairs. 

The speaker advised the Polish people 
here to conduct themselves in a peace- 
able and orderly manner, so as to gain 
the good will and respect of the Ameri- 
can people. Although thinking of our 
country that we left, do not forget that 
we are now American citizens and as 
such should endeavor to gain the good 
will and respect of all. 

The next features of the program were 
several stings by the Harmonia society, 
a declaration by Anton Grabarkiewiz, 
also two similar selections by John and 
I Idziorek. The president then made a 
few timely remarks and the celebration 
closed with music. 

On May 3, next,the anniversary of the 
adoption of the constitution on May 3, 
1701, which will be observed about in 
the same manner. 



SIMMONS IS FREE. 



The Verdict of Not Guilty; A Dramatic 
Scene in Court. 

At 9 o'clock this morning the jury in 
the Simmons murder case filed slowly 
into the courtroom and answered to their 
names. The defendant watched their 
faces anxiously and took nervous bites 
from a piece of paper which he held in 
his hand. The folded verdict was 
handed to the judge by the foreman and 
by the judge passed to the clerk who 
said: 

"Gentlemen of the jury listen to the 
reading of your verdict: 'We, the jury, 
find the defendant not guilty.' " 

Simmons sprang from bis seat 
walked rapidly to the jury 
and thanked and shook hands 
with each of them. Judge Stearns im- 
mediately ordered the discharge of the 
prisoner, and one of the hardest-fought 
trials in the history of St. Louis county 
came to a close. 

Forty-eight ballots were taken by the 
jury, the result showing from the fii st to 
forty -seventh ballot— not guilty, 11; 
guilty, 1. On the forty -eighth ballot, 
which was taken shortly after 8 o'clock 
this morning, the obstinate juror came 
around. The attempt te convict Sim- 
mons has been an expensive one for St. 
Louis county, as the total bill for the 
two trials will foot up to 12400. 

The divorce case of Elizabeth A. 
Brown vs. Andrew Brown is on trial be- 
fore Judge Ensign this afternoon. The 
defense made a motion for a continu- 
ance on the ground that important wit- 
nesses reside in P^ngland and that their 
testimony as to an act of adultery com- 
mitted in Birmingham, England, by the 
plaintiff is necessary. The motion after 
considerable argument was granted. 
The parties were allowed until tomorrow 
morning to make the settlement. 

The case of the Porter Steam Heating 
company vs. W. T. Bailey was then put 
on trial. The GorelinTims assault case 
is now on trial before Judge Stearns. 

Before Judge Ensign Noren vs. The 
Northwestern Fuel company reached 
the jury who returned a verdict of $500 
damages. 

Skating Champions, 

Duluthians will be given this wintflr 
the opjiortunity of witnessing some rare 
sport in skating races. Hugh McCor- 
mack, the Canadian champion, is ex- 
pected early next month to give an exhi- 
bition at the East End rink. Next Mon- 
day he races Axel Paulsen at Minneapo- 
lis for the champtouahip of the world. 



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BURNED MAN Y SHIPS. 

A Gang 'Arrested Whose Purpose Was to 
Burn Ocean Ships. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 23. — Two United 
States marshals will board the bark, 
Jennie Harkness, on her arrival today 
from Cebu, Phillipine Islands, with war- 
rants for the arrest of two of her crew, 
now confined in irons on charge of set- 
ting tire to the vessels and having been 
at the head of an organized gang whose 
purpose was to destroy every vessel load- 
ing at Manila. 

Not long ago, nearly every vessel load- 
ing at Manila suddenly caught fire, the 
flames bursting forth instantly from 
hatches and decks as if petroleum nad 
been spread over them. The Harkness 
was one of the first to cateh tire, and suf- 
fered great damage to her hull and 
cargo of sugar. The attention of marine 
underwriters of all nations of the world 
was called to this dastardly act. Many 
of the offenders were caught and pun- 
ished, and others sent to their respect- 
ive governmente for judicial trials. 

BOOM FOR BRADFORD. 

The Port Tubular steel Car Company Will 
Locate There. 

Bradford, Pa., Jan. 23.— The Steel 
Tubular Car company has opened stock 
books, and the citizens of Bradford sub- 
scribed to 830,000 worth of stocks. It is 
the hope of the company to place 81,000,- 
000 worth of stock here. Three thousand 
acres of land between Bradford and the 
New York state line has been purchased, 
and the erection of the works will be be- 
gun as soon as possible. 

The company will make the J. W. Post 
fire proof, indestructable steel tubular 
cars. The company has contracts for 
cars from the Pennsylvania road to keep 
it running for many months. Thirty- 
five towns were endeavoring to secure 
the car shops, but the company chose 
the Tuna valley on account of the great 
deposits of natural gas and coal. The 
capital stock is $5,000,000. 

SQUAW MEN BARRED. 

The Chickasaw Nation Will Disfranchise 
White Men. 

Little Rock, Ark., Jan. 23. — Advices 
received today from the Chickasaw na 
tion, Indian Territory, represent that 
bad blood between the native Chicka- 
saws and the white adopted citizens may 
lead to an outbreak. The ill-feeling 
grew out of the result of an election in 
.\uguBt, 1888, when William Guy and 
William Bird were rival candidates for 
the governorship. 

The former was warmly supported by 
all the white men, who through inter- 
marriage with the Chickasaws, had be- 
come members of the tribe, and was 
elected on the face of the returns. Bird 
contested and the matter was referred to 
the interior department at Washington 
and decided in his favor. The Guy 
party elected a majority of the legisla- 
ture, but through a decision of the su- 
preme court of the nation, white voters 
were declared ineligible and the legisla- 
ture confirmed the decision by passing a 
bill of disfranchisement. 

As the question now stands, no white 
man can vote or hold office in the Chick- 
asaw nation. 



An Karl Can do No Wroni;. 
London, Jan. 23.— The Earl of Gallo- 
way, who was acquitted last Octol>er of 
havihg assaulted a little girl named Gib- 
son, was arrested in Glasgow yesterday 
on a charge of accosting and molesting a 
16 year-old girl named Margaret Brown. 
It was alleged that the earl persisted in 
following the girl, but he only whispered 
to her once. Ho was admitted to bail 
in the sum of £50 for hearing today, 
when be was arraigned before a magie- 
trate who dismissed the charge on the 
ground that the alleged offence was not 
proven. 

A Trust in Gasoline Stoves. 

Cleveland, Ohio, Jan. 23. — Arrange- 
menta were completed at Chicago 
Wednesday for the consolidation of all 
the leading vapor .stove manufactories of 
this country. The capital stock will be 
$2,000,000, and the originator of the plan, 
Hon. D. A. Dangler of this city, says 
that enough money will be saved in run- 
ning exj^nses alone to pay 10 per cent 
dividends. 

TELEGRAM BRIEFS. 



Last night at Pittsburg two little girls 
named Walker were run down by a 
passenger train while walking on the 
track. One was killed. 

Out of the 211 presbyteries in the 
United States 47 have voted on the re- 
vision of the Westminster confession. Of 
these 35 have voted m favor of and 12 
against revision. Most of the votes 
for revision are in the West. 

A band of 800 Indians a short distance 
from Winnipeg is being rapidly wiped 
out, the grip in its severest form being 
the epidemic. They are not used to the 
disease and have no remedies. 

Nelson and Ramsey counties. North 
Dakota, want terms of the United States 
district court at Fargo, Grand Forks 
and Devils Lake. 

The Hamburg - American steamer 
Rhaetia from New York during the voy- 
age up the coast there was experienced 
a succession of most fearful gales, mostly 
from the west. At noon on the 
17th it blew a hurricane with a worse 
sea than before, but by the use 
of oil bags the steamer was ena- 
bled to weather the storm. 

Mary Petrikovosky, a pretty, golden- 
haired girl of 19, was shot dead at New 
York by .John Poixjff, a handsome but 
dissolute Russian whose attentions Miss 
Petrikovosky had rejected. Popoff is 
said to belong to a wealthy family in 
Moscow. 

The members of the Howard Athe- 
Dieum Variety company, who were 
thought to have perished in the snow 
blockade, have been located, blocked up 
for a week at Shady Run, about half 
way ujt the mountain between Colfax 
and the summit of the Sierras. 

At a meeting at Newark of leading 
cigarette manufacturers a syndicate was 
formed with a capital of 825,000,000 and 
200 shares will be issued. The object 
for which the association is formed is to 
cure leaf and to sell tobacco in all its 
forms. Factories will be established in 
all the states and territoriee and Can- 
ada. 

While Angelo Marello, an Italian girl, 
aged 17, of Newark, was picking coal on 
Friday last at the dumps, three boys 
stole up behind her and set fire to her 
clothing. She was horribly burned and 
will probably die. The police did not 
hear of the case until last night, and 
have no clue to the perpetrators. 

Kansas railroad managers are becom- 
ing considerably alarmed because the 
Kansas City, Wyandotte & Northwest 
company has reduced the passenger rate 
in Kansas from three to two cente per 
mile. It was done because the reads 
entering the Union depot at Kansas 
City refused to admit the Wyandotte 
line. The action of the new road is quite 
likely to bring about an agitation of the 
question of lower transportation rates all 
through the state. 



J. A. Boggs offers profitable invest- 
ments in Superior. This property will 
double in six months. 



CHEEI] FROM WHITTO, 



The (Quaker Poet Sends His 
Msssage to the Non- 
Partisans. 



They Are Now in Cleveland 

Organizing Their New 

Union. 



Knights of Labor and a Miner's 

Order in Session 

Also. 



Cleveland, Ohio, Jan. 23.— The non- 
partisan ladies, who are meeting in 
Clevelaiid for the purpose of organizing 
a National Womans Christian Temper 
ance union, are doing their work with 
great de liberation. The session of the 
convent on this morning was devoted to 
a discussion of the proposed constitu- 
tion. Mtb. Cornelia Alford of Brook- 
lyn, N. Y., secretary, asked for an assist- 
ant, and was given Mrs. Frank Voung 
of Pittstield, Ohio. 

Uniors at Showhegan, Me., and Mont- 
pelier, Vt., sent words of hope and en 
courage rent in the form of telegrams. 
The follDwing letter was received by one 
of the n. embers of the provisional com- 
mittee: 

"Amesbury, Mass. Illness prevents 
me fron, doing more than to thank thee 
for thy letter, and to say that 
I have always regretted the action 
of the V ^ C. T. U., in taking any partisan 
position I do not, by any means, im- 
peach the motive of the noble and de- 
voted wsmen of that organization, but I 
have 8e«in good accomplished by their 
separate I political action. I hope the 
non-par isan temperance workers will 
not was/e time and strength combatting 
any political organization, but go forward 
in their own way, which I think is the 
best way, and so far as I can see. the 
only on« likely to accomplish the great 
object rf temperance effort. With all 
good wiiihes, I am thy friend, 

(fcignedj "John G. Wuhtier." 

The committee on constitution re- 
p<jrted through the i-hairman, Mrs. J. 
Ellen Foster. The rep<irt was signed by 
ever> mjmberof the committee. The 
constitution was read by Mrs. Piatt B. 
Walkei- of Minnesota. 



SLEPT IT AN ARSENAL, 

But the Deputy Marshal Secured the Mur- 
deriUE Villains. 

Catlettsbueg, Ky., Jan. 23. — Five moat 
desperate characters were arrested 
Wednesday night for murdering on Sun; 
day night Constable Robert Long and" 
seriously wounding his wife in Guyan 
dote county, W. Va. Their names are 
John and Dell McCoy, Rye Jamison, 
Clark Fowler and Geo. liedding. 

The morning after their crime a strong 
force of avenging pursuers started out to 
capture them. Their horse tracks were 
followed toward the mountain regions, 
but the trail was soon lost. United 
States Deputy Marshal Sims obtained a 
clue to their hiding place, however, 
which was a shanty boat on the tug 
branch of the Big Sandy. Last mid- 
night the deputy marshal and posse se- 
cured the men as they slept, although 
each man wae wearing a tjelt full of re- 
volvers, and their room was an arsenal 
of Winchesters and other weapons. 

RATES CUT AGAI N . 

Tlie South Shore Announces Another Cut 
to Mlchiifan Point«. 

Rates to Detroit have been cut into 
again. A tariff was issued Jan. IG by 
the Zenith City Short line, to take effect 
Jan. 27, quoting an advance above the 
cut caused by the Burlington & 
Northern. 

Within the last few days, however, 
Chicago roads have been quoting a law 
rate to points in Michigan, and to meet 
this cut the South Shore road has issued 
an amendment to the tariff, cutting 
second-class rates, so that now the rate 
to Detroit and other near Michigan 
points is SIO, a cut of 83 from the old 
tariff and $1 from the one to go " into 
effect the 27th. Central New York 
pointe are also effected, the rate to 
Rochester being i)Ut at 810.40, to Syra- 
cuse $18, with ll'J to Utica. Boston is 
still $22.60 first class and $20.40 second 
class. 

Has Impeded TratHc. 

The light snow of last night made 
traffic on the streets somewhat heavy. 
In the morning snow was blown into 
drifts and piles rendering the labor of 
cleaning sidewalks vexatious and heart- 
breaking, for it all blew back again as 
fast as cleaned off. The street railway 
comiiany is in a bad way and ran ite 
' snow jilow all day and kej)t an army of 
shovelers at work. The day trains have 
been somewhat delayed on account of 
the drifta. 



A I.al>or Convention. 

CoLuiiBus, O, Jan. 23.— The joint con- 
vention of Knights of Labor and Pro- 
gresbive Union of Miners convened this 
morning. Mr. Roe of Knights of Labor, 
was elected temporary president, and 
John M ;Brice of the Mines, vice-presi- 
dent. J. letter was received by N. D. A. 
KV), fron (Jrand Master Workman Pow- 
derly, in which he says: "I am informed 
by your officers that something grand is 
promise! for the 23d, and, by the way, as 
that happens on my birthday, I hope it 
will be celebrated by something being 
done foi the permanent good of the 
miners of America." 



Too Far From Duluth. 

Fort Dodoe, la., Jan. 23.— Northern 
Iowa is threatened with an immediate 
coal famine, and if the present cold 
weather continues, great sufferinjjr is 
sure to result. The Fort Dodge and 
Lehigh coal fields are the principal 
sources of fuel supply for this region. At 
present more than half the miners are 
laid up with the gri|(. Others are work- 
ing night and day, but cannot sui)ply the 
demand. Special trains are run from 
the mines to meet urgent demands, but 
dealers announce that half their orders 
cannot be filled. 



A Searclier Seized. 
India <OLA, Iowa, Jan. 23. -Potts, the 
noted Des Moines "searcher," was today 
sentencid to three years in the peniten- 
tiary on a charge of perjury, growing out 
of one o' his litjuor seizures. Hamilton, 
his co-di»fendant, was acquitted. 

Dill Irwli> Fined for Libel. 

MiNNiiAPOLis, Jan. 2:3.— [Special.]— W- 
W. Irwii, the well-known criminal law- 
yer of 3t. Paul, plead guilty before 
Judge h icks of libelling Judge' William 
Welch of this city and was fined §20. 



The 3erald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, ete., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptly. 



The Unlnth Milk & Produce Company. 

The consolidated wholesale milk firms 
of R. A. Peers & Co. and Britlgeman & 
Sinotte have purchased the popular busi- 
ness establishment of Gage, Holland, 
Hayden <fc Co., at No. 11 East Superior 
street, and hereafter will conduct that 
business in connection with their very 
extensive milk trade. The new ffrm are 
not strangers to this line of business and 
will conduct a strictly tirstclass farm 
and dairj- product store, where the 
choicest butter, the freshest of eggs and 
cream can always be secured. The new 
firm starts out under favorable auspices 
and is bound to win success. The firm 
name will be the Duluth Milk «t Pro- 
duce company. 

To the Pul>lic. 

Notice is hereby given that Frank A. 
Taylor is not in our employ, and we are 
not resiKjnsible for any representations 
made by him. 

The Dvlcth Music Co., 

Succ essors to W. J. Dye r &. Bro. 

Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 
block. 



-I- CHEAP - ACRES -i- 



NEXT TO LAND THAT WILL BE 



Platted This Spring 



WILLIAM C. SARGEKI. 



REAL ESTATE. 

Special Bargains I Snaps. 

' OCl Acres in 4-50-1 4, 25 percent below the 
market. 
200 Acres in 47- 1 6 at $5 per acre. 

Lands in 28-50- 1 5 at a great bargain. 
Several pieces of acreage on thenill below 
the market. 

S! Lots on Superior Street, Endion. 

6Jl Lots adjoining Lonaon, cheap. 

A few of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on easy terms. 

A few desirable lots in Endion for sale without cash pay- 
ment, if improved. 

J. M. ROOT 8i CO, 

^ Room 0, Metropolitan Block. 



■ mai. 



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DULtJTH JjrEND^G HBBALDi JAITCTAIIY 28, 1890. 



Ji:V^EXiNU llEliALD. 

ELIOT LORD, PublUher. 

PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subscription Rate*: 

Daily, by mall, per year •7.00 

Daily, by mall. p«r tbre« months 2.0O 

Daily, by mail, per one month 76 

IN THE CITY. 

Daily, by carrier, per week ■& 

BntervU at the poetuffice at Duluth, Minn., as 
•econd-class mall matter. 

3'~The Waahlofrton office of The Herald Is 
at 14S4 New York avenue. N. W., where the 
paper is kept on tile and where The Herald 
oorrespoadent will welcome visitors from the 
Northwest. 



Call tor K«pul>Ucan Cauciu. 

All legally qualittnl voters who intend to 
vote for the republican candidates for the 
yarious offices to l>f tllle«l in llio city of Duluth 
on February 4. ISM.1, at the rejfular city elec- 
tion, are hercliy uotiUed that caucuses wiL be 
held between the hours of 5 and ^ p.m.. on 
January U. i.^W. for tlie puriwac of electlutf 
delegates to the city reuubllcati cH^uvention. 

The placeH for holding caucuses and the 
numt«ei- ot deUxates to wlileh each precinct is 
entilli-d have (neu tsLiil>lu»he<l as follow; 

first wurd— A?a Uaileys lumber office, -tSJ 
Ijake uveuue south. 

c^econd ward— James McBeth's store, Kast 
Sui)erior street. 

Third ward, Urst Precluct— Ready building, 
ISti Kast First street. 
Second vireeinoi — 331 East Superior street. 
Third precinct— East bud livery barn. 
Fourth ward. First precinct— 113 West First 
Street. 
Second precinct — 319 West Superior street. 
Third precinct— 701 West Superior street. 
Fmh ward, First precinct- Iduo West Su- 
perior street. 
Secoud precinct— «!36 Garfield avenue. 
Third preciuct- IrtiJ West .Michigan street. 
Siith ward— "iSl West Michigan street. 
The basis of representation lias been lljtetl at 
one delegate to each loj votes or maj r frac- 
tion I hereof cast for the republican candidate 
at «he lajit presidential election, and one dele- 
gate at large for ea».-h precinct. 

Kacli waid iseutiiied to the following repre- 
sentation: First ward, 4 delegates; Second 
ward. 3 de.eg'ites: Third ward. Fii-st precinct 
4 delegates; second precinct, 3 delegates: Third 
precinct, 3 delegates: Fourth ward. First pre- 
cinct, 5 delegates: Secoud precinct, 4 delegates; 
Third precinct. 3 delegates: Fittfi ward. First 
precinct, 3 delegates: Second precinct, 4 dele- 
gates. Third precinct, 3 delegates; Sixth want. 
J delegates. 

J.OIES DiNOW.VLL. 

JoHX H. LaVaql'b, 
P. S. Anneke. 
Ch.\ki,es UL'NCAK, 

H. S. Lord, 
S. M. Lestkb, 
City liepubilcan Com. 



Call for City Republican ConTentiou. 

All duly elected delegates to the city repub- 
lican cxjn vent ion will meet in the council room 
at the city ha 1, uuiuth, Minnesota, on Jan. 'Jb, 
lt4*i, ai - p. m, for the purpoi*e of placing in 
nomination republican candidates for the var- 
ious offices as lollows: Mayor: two aldermen. 
First ward; one aideruiau, Second ward; one 
alderman. Third ward; one alderman. Fourth 
ward; one alderman, Fitth ward; one alder- 
man. Sixth ward. 

M. O. H.\i.L. Chairman Com. 



honestly intending to vote for the party 
nominees, but if he is indeed an hooeet 
man and true citizen, he will not swear 
to support blindly in advance anybody 
and everybody whom his party delegates 
may see tit to put up as nominees for 
office. We believe in the application of 
common sense to the question of party 
loyalty as we do to all other questions, and 
there is no common sense in submitting 
loyalty to such a rack. A republican 
has a right, or should have, to enter a 
caucus of his party and vote un- 
questioned without pledging himself to 
act inevitably like a section of an iron 
machine. If that is the force of the 
oath of qualification, no challenged man 
should take it. 

It will be a grave mistake for any 
party, as we believe, if it attempts to 
draw too tightly the bontls of its cau- 
cuses at the risk of e.xcluding men with 
independent heads who will never sur- 
render completely the right of inde- 
pendent judgment. There is a wide 
gulf fixed between the crank who is 
satisfied with nothing which a party 
does and the blind partisan who swallows 
everything. Between these extremes a 
mass of sober, thinking, loyal party men 
stands, and no party machine is well run 
which throws them out or disgusts 
them. We have confidence that the 
primaries will be run lit>erally and in- 
telligently, as they should be, and we 
(X)unt it the duty of all loyal party men, 
who are qualified voters, to attend them. 
For at the primaries the government of 
the city this year wih be rough hewn. 



THEIR INNERMOST THOUGHTS. 



C. E. Liovett: There's a big inquiry 
for Sixth division property, even from 
parties outside of the city. I think 
another month will see a great activity 
in West Duluth realty. 

Mayor Sutphin: A great many of my 
friends want me to run for mayor again, 
but, good Lord, I've had enough of it. 

Chief Clerk for J. J. Coatello: We sold 
in October to the city spikes at $2.G0 a 
keg. Street and other contractors paid 
$2.7u, and we retailed the same spikes at 
$3. I don't see why there should be any 
kick at this. 

E. C. Thurston: There can be more 
thrown away in the back end of a res- 
taurant with a teaspoon than can be 
saved by a bushel basket in the front 
end. There's no place where economy 
is so necessary as in a restaurant 
kitchen. 

IN JANUARY. 



[Boston Ulobe.l 
Now springs the timid snowdrop from her bed 

And peers about, all modestly bedight. 
Upon a world that ten to one's arrayed. 

Just like her own sweet self, in virgin white. 

Now prank themselves her pretty sisters, too. 
The crocuses— mayhap a bit more lH>ld 

Thau she, as they put forth their faces fair 
And forms tricked out In purple and in gold. 

Now gayly do the darling ilafTodils 
Go uoddiug each a dear and dainty head: 

Now do Annunciation lilies tall 
From swaying eeiuers precious incense shed 

Now valiantly the shrinking violet— 
At fifty cents a bunch — goes on parade; 

Now blooms the red rosi' in my lady's bower. 
But O the florist's bill Is still unpaid ! 



BITS OF STATE NEWS. 



con- 



Call for Citr Democratic Convention. 

The city democratic convention will be held 
in the council rooms at the City Hall. Duluth. 
Minn., on Jan. T., Ina). at - o'clock p. ni.. for 
the purpose of placing in nomination candi- 
dates for the following offices, viz: Mayor; 
two aldernie/i. First ward: »Mie alderman. 
Sei'OBd wani; one alderman. Third ward; one 
aideruiau. Fourth ward; one alderman. Fifth 
ward; one alderman. Sixth ward. 

AU qualified electors who intend to vote for 
the demoi-ratic nominees at the coming city 
election are hereby uolifled that caucuses will 
be held tietwc-en the hi>urs ol o and (• p. m . on 
Jan. 'Si. l-Wi. to elect delegates to the city 
democratic convention. 

The following places have been designated, 
and each ward is entitled to the following 
numLier uf delegates: 

First wanl — -iT-i Lake avenue south, five dele- 
gates. 

Second ward— Strute Bros.' store, two 
delegates. 

Third ward— 155 East Superior street, ten 
delegates. 

Fourth ward — Office of Lehigh Coal company. 
Merchants hotel, twelve delegates. 

Fifth ward— Dowlan's livery stable, seven 
delegates. 
Sixth ward— McKays store, three delegates. 
One delegate for each fifty votes and major 
fraction cast tor E. .M. Wilson for governor and 
one at large for each ward has been fixed as 
the basis o. representation, 

Chaulks d'Actremost, 
Chairman City Committee. 



How do these market quotations of 
Kilt strike this city? Per barrel, at Mil- 
waukee 72c: at Chicago, 7*2c, at St 
Paul, ;§1.10; in Minnesota west of St. Paul 
aad Duluth, ai.'2<); at Duluth, ^l.Jo. It 
is true that the same salt is sold here 
for export at 72c, but that only points 
the edge of Ihe discrimination against 
us more sharply. Will some silent mem- 
ber of the salt trust rise and explain how 
it works to the satisfaction of the head 
of the unsalted seas? 



We quote in another column an editor- 
ial in The Chicago Tribune on the drift 
of the corn traffic of the West, that takes 
for its text an article that appeared in 
The Herald a few days ago on the 
quantity of corn paasing East 
through the Sault on the Duluth 
South Shore & Atlantic and Soo roads. 
Chicago is troubled at the decrease in 
her percentage of the com traffic, and 
gives her reasons why the movement is 
unnatural and cannot last. The facts 
may not bear out these reasons. 



so TO THE PRIMARIES. 

Remember that next Tuesday is the 
only day remaining for registering to 
save your vote at the coming election. 
Don't forget that, if you have not yet 
ragistered! And for your own sake and 
the city's sake, go to the primaries. It 
is at the caucus that the delegates will 
be chosen who will determine the char- 
acter and make-up of our next city gov- 
ernment. True, there may be independ- 
ent citizen nominees, but the weight of 
influence and political organization is 
manifestly behind the regular party can- 
didates, and except under extraordinary 
conditions, the strongest party 
organization will efect its nomi- 
nees. We do not propose 
now to discuss the effect of the sharp 
drawing of party lines in city elections. 
There is no substantial public advantage 
in it, but it is practically idle to question 
the expediency of a prevailing practice 
at this hour. It is the more imperative 
therefore for every loyal citizen to see to 
it that fit delegates are chosen in everj- 
case which he can influence to represent 
honest and progressive public sentiment 
in the choice of city officers. 

Under the state law any person act- 
ing as inspector, teller or canvasser at a 
primary election shall be guilty of a mis- 
demeanor if he shall knowingly receive 
the vote of any individual who shall 
have been challenged or who is known to 
him not to be entitled by the regula- 
tions of the association holding 
the primary election to vote 
at such primary, unless the intending 
voter if duly qualified by law and will 
swear io the necessary qualifications of 
a voter asprexcribed by the regulations 
of the asaociatioH holding the primary. 
To this final clause we call special atten- 
tion. It is obvious that the inspector is 
bound to insist upon compliance with 
the regulations of the association hold- 
ing the primary in the event of a chal- 
lenge. We trust therefore that sound 
discretion will be applied in this matter 
of challenges. For by the regulations of 
theRepubhcan Party association, for 
example, as we are informed, a chal- 
lenged voter is required to swear that 
he proposes to vote for the party nomin- 
ees without distinction or the privilege 
of scratching the name of anyone whom 
he believes to be unfit for office. 

This is a hide-bound requirement to 
which no free republican should be sub- 
jected. The test of loyalty to party and 
of qualification for voting at party cau- 
cuses should be what a man has done in 
the past, not what he might under a 
possible contingency do in the future. 
An honest man will enter such a caucus 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



Said a friend somewhat of an antiquarian, 
too, who has Just returned from a visit to sev- 
eral cities where a historical society is a lead- 
ing feature of educational growth: "Very 
few people realize the importance of the work 
of these societies. To one who has had occa- 
sion to use tliem their benefits can hardly be 
estimated. Tlie work of the officers Is, you 
might say thankless, and it seems a wonder 
that the officers should take the pains they do 
to secure the information and papers needed. 
If the citizens of Duluth have any appreci- 
ation of their best interests and of the vast 
mass of information gradually sUpplng from 
their grasp, they will Investigate the methods 
and resources of these historical societies and 
start one. Money is not the only thing needed 
in fact, it is but a small part of what is wanted. 
Enthusiasm and knowledge are the prime 
requisites, and these Duluthians have. 



» * » 
A young man who has patronized Chinese 
laundries for over five years has suddenly 
desisted. Last week when he opened the 
bundle supposed to contain his freshly-laun- 
dried shirts, c ilfs and collars, he discovered 
that two of the latter were of a style he had 
never seen before, and that two of hla favorite 
c-ollars were missing. Taking the strange 
neck-adorners back to the laundry, he tried to 
convinc-e the almond-eyed Celestial that a mis- 
take had Ijeen made, that he had been given 
two of someone's else collars. With a bland 
smile on his sallow face the representative of 
the Orient explained that "me no makee mis- 
take; me couldn't, have too manly paplers 
wlitee on; collas muchee lagged on tip and me 
cutteetipofTee; see?" Yes. the young man 
saw. It was plain enough for anyone to see. 
But he now patronizes American Industry. 
* * * 

I read a pretty good thing a few days ago 
which will be of Interest to attorneys n w at- 
tending court. It is some peculiarities of an 
English court of Juatic-e. as seen by an Ameri- 
can newspaper corresjiondent. One thing he 
noted was the unobstructed employment of 
leading .luestions. This, if the prosecution 
wished to elicit c-ertaln facts. It would ask: 
"Were you at such a place on a certain day'/" 
"Did you meet there at that time, so and so'/" 
"Did he say to you that the defendant admit- 
ted having picked Johnson's pocket? ' Now In 
our practice I believe the same thing would be 
about as foUows: "W^here were you at such a 
date?" "Whom, If anj lx>dy, did you meet 
there:" "Give the conversation, if any, that 
occurred." This, I fancy, would be 
the American style. Interspersed with three 
wordy contests between the counsel, a couple 
of legal arguments, a like number of rulings 
by the judge and "exceptions noted' all 
around. The stupendous mountain of sheep- 
skin literature whlcli one sees in an American 
c-ourtroom Is here nowhere to be seen. There 
is not even a single law book la sight. Either 
the counsel have the law all committed to 
memory, or else there Is no use for any such 
article. Evidently the latter phase prevails to 
some e|tent. There was no thundering "I 
object:' followed t>y long arguments and the 
citation of Innumerable authorities. Nor 
were there any exceptions over taken to any 
of the decisions of the judge -which fact of 
course arises from there being no court of 
appeal in criminal cases. 



The Minnesota National guards 
vention is in session at the Capitol. 

Tracey Murray, a young domestic, 
froze her feet yesterday and did not 
discover it until she stopped where she 
had f Jrmerly worked. Everything pos- 
sible t<j save the girl's feet was done. 
She was taken to the city hospital and 
may lose both of them. 

The Clinton Bridge company will be 
awarded the contract for building the 
new steel drawbridge at La Crossa 
Their bid was g80,(.XX). 

The stockholders of the Duluth, St. 
Cloud, Mankato & Southern railway held 
a meeting at St. Cloud yesterday and 
elected officers. 

J. G. Evans, formerly of Minnesota, 
who was injured in an elevator at the 
pension building Washington, died from 
the effects of his injuries. His funeral 
wai* attended by many Minnesota men 
who chanced to be in the city. 

The Minneapolis Clearing House asso- 
ciation yesterday elected officers. The 
Swedish-American bank was admitted 
to the association, making the total 
number of banks in the clearing house 
seventeen. 

J. H. Chapman, superintendent of 
Olmsted county schools, reports that 
one-quarter of the schools in the county 
have been closed temporarily on account 
of the grip. 

During the last eighteen months the 
astronomers at Carelton college obsena- 
torj', Xorthfield, have been making a 
catalogue of GOO stars, designated by 
Professor Stone of Virginia, who needed 
their accurate places to use them as 
reference stars in determining the posi- 
tion of hundreds of new nebula? which, 
by the aid of his 20-inth refracting tele- 
scope, he has recently discevered. 

The Musical union held a poverty 
sociable at their rooms at Anoka, and 
prizes were awarded for the most out- 
landish costumes in the gathering. 
Some of the suits were ludicrous in the 
extreme, and provoked no end of mirth. 

A Bad Uaad. 

The widow had just said no. 

"Life is a game," said Upson Downes, 
reflectively. "I thought it was draw, 
and I drew for a queen, but it seems to 
be euchre for me." 

"In that case," said the lady consol- 
ingly, "you will have to go it alone." 

"Yes, and what's worse," said Mr. 
Downes, "I can't take my partner's best 
card." 

"I always knew you were a horrid mer- 
cenary thing," remarked the widow as 
she cut out of the room, and left Mr. 
Downes to shuffle oa his lonesome way. 

WITH STATE EDITORS. 



A Pointed Quention. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

The Daily Herald of recent date states 
that five pounds of quinine is daily dis- 
pensed by the drug stores and saloons in 
Duluth. What right have saloons to 
sell quinine? It is in direct violation of 
law for any person to sell, give or dis- 
pense drugs or medicines of any kind, 
unless such person be a licenciate of 
pharmacy of Minnesota. This law was 
made in 1884, for the protection of 
humanity in general, not for the benefit 
of druggists, but inasmuch as we are 
compelled to meet the requirements of 
this law by tedious hours of study 
and long, weary hours of labor and 
practice, we should in justice derive 
some benefit from it, and we propose to 
do it. If the sale of quinine and other 
drugs continues in saloons some steps 
will be taken to enforce the law, and the 
penalty for such violation is severe and 
expensive. 

The law can be found in the General 
Ljiws of the state of Minnesota, 1884, 
entitled "an act to regulate the practice 
of pharmacy in the state of Minnesota." 

Druggist. 

Wanted to Make .Sure of lliin. 

Judge: George— The ring doesn't 
seem to fit very well, Clara. Hadn't I 
better take it back and have it made 
smaller':* 

Clara— No, George; an engagement 
ring IS an engagement ring, even if I 
have to wear it around my nock. 

NOTED PEOPLE. 




T 



Senator Stanford has given $500 to 
Susan B. Anthony for the benefit of the 
woman suffrage cause. 

Old Marshal MacMahon, ex-President 
of France, has completed his memoirs, 
but they will not be given to the public. 

Gen. Fonseca has bieen elected to the 
grand mastership of all the Brazilian 
loilges of the order of Free Masons. 

Mr. Gladstone is engaged in selecting 
18,000 volumes from his library, which 
he is about to place in the public library 
at Hawarden. 

Senator Quay has been ordered to 
F'lorida by his physician and will leave 
Washiriiton on the 2Gth, to remain 
away until he has recovered his health 
or been materially l)enefited. 

Dr. Lyman Abbott has been installed 
as the pastor of Plymouth church, 
Brooklyn, the only installation of a 
pastor since that of Mr. Beecher in 1847. 

Jones Ordway, a millionaire lumber- 
man of (Jlens tails, X. Y., presented the 
Young Mens Christian association of 
that place with an order on the lumber 
company for ^),000 cash. A four-story 
building wiil be erected in the spring. 



The Importance of puilf ylng the blood can- 
not be overestimated, for without pure 
blood you cannot enjoy good health. 

At this season nearly every one needs a 
good medicine to purify, vitalize, and enrich 
tlie blood, and Hood's Sarsaparilla is worthy 
your confidence. It in peculiar In that It 
strengthens and builds t.-p the system, creates 
an appetite, and tunes the digestion, while 
it eradicates disease. Give it a trial. 

Hood's Sarsaparllla is sold by all druggists. 
Prepared by C. 1. Hood & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

100 Doses One Dollar 



REAL ESTATE. 



Indian river oranges at Victor Huot'a. 

UomeA for Mechanics. 

I have some fine lots for sale within 

ten minutes' walk of all the works at 

and near West Duluth at reasonable 

prices and terms. J. A. Booos, 

35 Farguson Building. 

Dancing and De^mrtment. 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. 113 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wetlneetlays, at 8 p. m. 



6PERCENTI 



Mankato Free Press: A St. Paul boy 
has been awarded a $1000 prize for tell- 
ing a story. Several thousand other 
boys of that city are wondering why 
their latest prevarications brought 
nothing more agreeable than the usual 
strap application. 

Fergus Falls Journal: Alexandria 
votes Tuesday on the question of buying 
and owning the electric plant recently 
put into that city. The man who put it 
in has not been able to carry it on, and 
the proposition is to take it off his hands 
at $8000. The village owns the water 
works and the two will be operated to- 
gether. It is proposed to turn one-half 
of the liquor license money into the 
fund for paying for the plant, and after 
it is paid for to put the money into the 
operation of it, that the people mav get 
water and light at the lowest figures. 

Moorhead News: As soon as it is 
demonstrated that the North Dakota 
coal is of useful quality, will not the 
railroads which haul the Eastern coal 
compel the only railroad which is access- 
ible to the North Dakota coal, to ad- 
vance the rates on its transportation so 
as to irake it just as dear as the former? 
We shall see. 

Mankato Free Press: Though Secre- 
tary Blaine is undoubtedly severely 
prostrated by the loss of his son, we sup- 
pose the report of his retirement from 
the cabinet is simply gossip. His con- 
duct of the state department has been 
such as to disarm hisenemiesand secure 
approval at home and abroad, and it 
would be a calamity to the administra- 
tion for him to retire at this time. 



We have at command unlimited 
amountsof money to lend promptly 
at 6 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Boi on ie Hill 



FOR SALE: 

50-11"ln Hcreaje, - 
49-15--ln toje, - 
Superior Street 
Dock Property, - 



1 



mm OF THE GflOSL 



An Old Lady, a Stranger and a 

Goose Constitute the 

Subject of a 



Little Story, Which, if you Have 

the Leisure, You Might 

Read. 



Whether True or False We Canno^Say; At any 

Rate, Some Useful Lessons May be 

Gathered Therefrom. 



warm ;, 



Lots for sale as 
as $25 each. 



low 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



LOANS 



MADE AT 



6, 7 AND 8 PER CENT. 



Loans Made on Unimproved Property. 



BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTY. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTGAGES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



Money on Hand. 



NO DELAY. 



JONES & BRACE, 

Real Estate and Loans, 
409 FIRST NATIONAL BANK. 



mm i fwim 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 

Duluth National Bank Building. 



FROM DESPAIR TO JOY. 



Sccnrcd Hap- 



THE POLITICAL ONLOOKER. 



C. O. Nelson, the well-known furniture man. 
ha« determined to agraln be a candidate for 
aldermanic lienors la the Fiftti ward. Mr. 
Nelson Is a popular man, well known here, 
and will undoubtedly poll as iar^e a vote aa 
any candidate that has yet been placed before 
the public. Alderman Armstrongr has about 
decided not to run for re-election. T. D. Cral» 
Is lH.iujf boomed by the youii» men of that 
ward for alderman. 

* * • 

There wa» a small gatheringr of poUtlclans 

who favor the candidacy of S. A. Slverts for 

aldermun In the Sixth ward. Nothinif much 

more was done than todiscus-s the political 

Mr. Slverts haa a strong following. 



situation. 



J. A. 



Boggs offers three very fine 
building lots in Lakeside very cheap 
and on easy terms. 



Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 
the market, W. A. Foots A, C!o. 



Yoa Bet He WnU 

Fargo Republican: Did it ever occur 
to you that a man that climbs to the top 
of a freight train, such mornings jis 
these, and twists brakes, isn't overpaid? 

Knows a Good Thins on Sight. 

Winona Republican : Duluth has 
passed the stage when its pretences to 
coming greatness can be ridiculed. It 
is now one of the really important com- 
mercial cities of the interior, and its 
course hereafter must be contiLually on- 
ward and upward. Minnesota as a state 
will be btmelited hy the progress of Du- 
luth and will rejoice in its success. 

Dlttgruiitled Democrat* rialnt. 

St Cloud Times: When grumbling 
over "hard times," the stringency of 
money, and no work for laboring men, 
people should recall the campaign of 
1888, ^^ when "protection to American 
labor" and the success of Harrison were 
offered as the consummations necessary 
to bring us an unexampled era of grf^t 
prosperity. We have got the "protec- 
tion," we've got Harrison, we've got the 
worst times the country has seen for 
years, and to top it all off, we've got the 
Russian "grip." Such, in part, are the 
results of republican success. 

Romance V'erHUH Reality, 

"George," she whispered softly, "mark 
yonder breadth of cloud, stretching to 
the utmost part of the heavens, a 
boundless, infinite sea of nothingness." 

"Nothingness!" he echoed, "Why, 
great Scott, Maria, there's a quart of 
rain in every square ^oot of that there 
cloud." 




rbe Palnfal Story of a 
and How She Finally 
pinasa. 

Mn. Morton D. Harlan, residing at No. 58 
West 25th Street, New York City, has pasw>d 
through a moat wonderful experience. Mrs. 
Harlan had a happy bomo 
and through her devotion to 
her home duties over-taxed 
her strength. She had de- 
pressed feelings, entire lack 
of energy in life, and finally 
a cough at night and morn- 
Ing which grew worse each 
day. Upon looking in tlie 

?'1aas8hesaw dark circlM under her eyes snd 
ound thntshe wtis Kruwing- thinner and losiritf 
all Interest in lifa. This painful stato <if thin«s 
continued for months until finally she becaraa 
80 weak she could not attend to her duties and 
was confined to hnr bed the greater part of the 
time. One day Mrs. Harlan^ very dear friend 
Mrs. Wiiluni called and was amazed to am; her 
Bo wan and failed. Two bright hectic spots 
stood upon each che«k, her lips were blue, 
her face pinched and drawn, and there was a 
piteous I'lok in her eyes. Mrs, Willard know 
this moant consumption and her henrt was 
tx^mciied for her friend. At her earnest rtsjuest, 
the use of an English Rem- ~ 

edy for consumption wets 
tried. At the start very 
little effect oou Id be seen, so 
great an inroad had the dis- 
ease mude, but by degrees 
Mrs. Hiirliin began to regain 
her liiRt appetite, then her 
strength, tnea her hope, 
then her health, and she is to- 
day in perfftct physical con- 
diti'>n, wholly as a resnlt of 
the use of Dr. Acker's Eng 
lish Hcmedy for Consump-^ 
ion. 

The lesson of this slmpla story should be plain 
ko all. No man i>r wnman vnn afford to neglect 
those llrst symptoms of consumption, which 
isem so slight but which becomes so terrible 
unless taken in time. This Great Remedy haa 
laved the lives of hundreds of well known mi-n 
and women who were on the verjrc of the grave 
From ouuHumptlon but wb(j arc well and uapp* 
XMlay. It is sold universally. 

For Sale in Duluth by Boyce & Totman 

CHRISTIAN SCTeNCeI 

FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature with 
which the table Is supplied and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



SPECIAL LIST 



—or— 



BARGAINS 



was a good one, 
on" so quick that 



OFFKIIED BY 



C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage on the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest in this forty 
acres can be had for $62,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 1 50 

I Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 



The best b»rgain offered now is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An Investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing In the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



C. E 



RICHARDSON, 

336 West Superior Street. 




COFFm & WAI1II[R, 

30 FAHGUSSON Bti<X!K. 

80 Acres, section 9-49- 1 5. 
I 20 Acres, section 28-49- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 33-49-16. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-50- 1 5. 
80 Acres, section 29-50-15. 

All below the market. 
COFFIN & WARNER. 



The Herald bindery has the Ijeet 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



DiE.G.WESfi 

NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Sppclflc for Hvsteria, nl2^ineP^Fils,Neu^alpla Wake 
fur.e« Mental Ivpn-ssion. WofteiilnW of the Itrttin re 

;lf ,*l; P^'-""";'"' .^"'' '*««'• » '"eii.i.-»s. 1.08S „r l-ow,.r 

inu»«l bv over^ijiertlo.i of ihi- brain sclf.nlm.pT, 

^»^er.l„dulgo„™^ Kach Ik., <*ntains„nemo,;,h':."^;V. 

/iiaranue to ,-..f,„..l a.on. y if the trea men" faiuT' 
cure, ouarautee-* iwueU au.l gcuuiue ^1,1 only by 

- S^^f Q* Totman. Phoenix Drug Store, and 
j^west Superior street, sole agents, Duluth, 



W. C. SHERWOOD & CO., 

REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVK OENDINK BABOAIM8 IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In dlffei parts of the city and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 



All we ask Is for pi rtles to examine our list and 

compare them rlth other prices before 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood & Co., 



J. D. & R. C. RAY. 

REAL ESTATE. 



ROOM "B," 



HUNTER BLOCK. 



B.CGHIDLKY. J. C. MISHLRB 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER. 
Real Estate Brokers 

Boom 36, Bzchan«re Building:. 
List your property witb us at what It Is worth 
and we will soil It. We Invite everybody to 
call In and see us, and solicit correspondence 



" I knew an old wife, lean and poor. 
Her ruKs scarce held t.oKuther; 
There strode a. (itranjrer to the door. 
And it was windy weather. 

He held a eroose upon his arm. 
He utter'd riiyiiie and reasou : 

"Here, take the jfotLsc and keep you 
It 18 u stormy season.' 

She caught the white goose by the leg; 

A goose— 'twas no great niwttcr; 
The jffKJse let full the Kolden egg 

With cackle and wiiii clatter. 

She dropt the goose and caught the pelf. 
And ran to tell iier neighbors; 

And bless'd herself, and cursotl herself. 
And rested from her labors." 

—Tennyson. 

Our readers may possibly 
think that ihe foregoing poem 
is rather far-fetched. But after 
all, when rightly considered, it 
contains some food for reflec- 
tion. There are a great many 
people -who have a hard strug- 
gle in life, and often when 
everything seems darkest and 
the surroundings are the most 
discouraging, they are nearest 
port. It is an old saying that 
"The darkest hour is just be 
fore day." This old lady in 
the rhyme saw an opportunity 
and she didn't wait to ask how 
old the goose was; whether it 
was fat or lean; or whether, on 
the whole, she had better ac- 
cent or decline. She took it 
"too quick," and in seizing the 
first good piece of fortune in- 
stanter, another and a greater 
one immediately followed. In 
acquiring a ctjmpetence, the 
first thousand dollars is gener- 
ally the most difficult to ac- 
quire. Many times people 
work long and hard and have 
to practice rigid economy to 
get a btart, and then get into 
the right current and drift on 
to fortune with apparent ease. 
But such people never refuse 
splendid opportunities, or turn 
their backs on small thinsrs. It 
IS the easiest thing in the world 
to make money if you only get 
into the right drift. The old 
lady had faith that the goose 
and she "caught 
the goose 
yielded up a golden egg and the 
poor woman's fortune was made. 
Now, Vcu may smile when wc 
apply the moral to something 
practical. It would have been 
no more unwise for the dear old 
lady to have refused to accept 
the goose till she had first Deen 
introduced to the stranger and 
ascertained that he was of a re- 
spectable family, than it is for 
you to stand hesitating as to 
whether you should buy lots in 
Crosley Park at the give away 
prices we are offering them at. 
In a year from now we will all 
see how ridiculous it was for 
Mr. Crosley to sell such tine 
property at such prices, to say 
nothing of the terms, and for 
you to stand by looking on when 
you should have known that val- 
ues must inevitably make such 
large advances in so shoit a 
time. When spring opens up 
(and there is but one more 
month of winter) there will be 
from fifty to one hundred new 
houses built in Crosley Park 
and Lester Park adjoining. 
Within six months suburban 
trains will run each wa}' every 
half hour from 6 a. m. till mid- 
night, and the fare will proba- 
bly be the same as street car 
fare. Then, too, within a year 
you can build a ^||k>}00o resi 
dence down there it you wish, 
and you can have water, sewers 
and electric lights the same as 
you have in Duluth. AH these 
things are now assured, and 
those who buy Crosley Park 
lots by the quantity at present 
prices will make big money. 
We propose to advance prices 
soon and we suggest that it 
would be a good idea to buy 
before that time; i e, if you 
care to iiiake money. There is 
always a time to buy and a'time 
to sell, and now is the time to 
buy lots at Crosley Park, and 
any time during the next five 
3 ears you will have opportuni- 
ties of selling so as to make 
large profits. Call at the office 
and get further information. 








i^e Girls aii7d Boys 

all I^Ave mr cfjoice. 

W7ICI7 IS 

F^i rbaNk's SAtlTA Clau§> Soar 

' FOR ALL " 

HOUSEHOLD AND 
LAUN DRY purpose s: 

MADE ONLY BY 

N.K.i^/-iR9ANK&C0; 




Chicago. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 15 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



DB. GEO. It. HAYCOCK, 



Manager 



Two Nights of Meiiiment 

MONDAY AID TUESDAY, 

JAN. 27 and 28. 

F ;r8t appearance hero of 

W. TILLOTSON'S 

[f Comedy Comp'f 

In the New York succesti of two seasons, 

ZIG ZAG. 



w 




Presented with the orijrinal cast, headed by 
the chariuinsrsoubrette, ANNA BOYD. 



Sale of seat i Thursday, Jan. 
in prices. 



23. 



advance 



PEOPLES THEATER. 



DULUTH, 



JOHN 8. BARNES. Mgr. 



Ttie Best Varietj Slicw in the Nortliwest 



This w©»k, commencing JAN. 
M 5RRISEY & RICH'S 



20. 



mm COIVIED! COMPi! 



ADMISSION: 

TO GALLERY, lOc; Pit, 25c; Orchestra chairs, 
36c; Boxes, 60c. 



OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned, 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER, 106 Second St. East. 



WMITS, FOB SALE. ETC 



ONE CENT A ^ORD IN ADVANCE. 



Advertisements under this head received at 
the loliowiu^ places, besides the business of- 
Oec ol i he Heraid : 

Kudiou Pharmacy, 127 Tenth avenue east. 

Boyce & Totiuan, corner Fourth avenue 
and Superior street west. 

J. W. NeUon, No. INOl, comer Bifhteenth 
avenue west ana Superior street. 

L». Johnson, chief clerk PhilUps hotel. West 
Uuiuth. 



Help Wanted. 

WANTED— A cools for a smaU family, 
quire, a*i Easi Secoud tlreet. 



In 



w 



ANTED— A boy at St. Lukes hospital. 



WANTED— Local agents to lepresent the 
uudcrijijfucd at all piiucipai cities in the 
Lulled states, beiuK uiaiiutaciurers' afeuts 
rcprvscutiUK over Utly dittereui lines of staple 
and specialties, KOuOs ana waies to be sold to 
tlie traae. liucrg:eiic workers who can irive 
salislaciory bonds ana advance sufficient 
money to cover costs ot a L-<jmplcte sample out- 
ni will Hud an fciLceileui opportunity to make 
money cud liavc a peniiuiicut position. Ad- 
dretjs Caldwell Commis&iou Company. a)6 Ran- 
dolph Street, Cliicaifo. ill. 



WANIED— Com|)ctent jfiri for housework; 
one tliat cau c<x>k. Two in family 
Apply lirowu liroiherfc, 19 West Superior 
street. 



iWlSH to employ a few ladies on salary to 
take chart^e of my business at their homes. 
i"tfhl, very tusciuatiuK aua heaithlui. Wa^es 
»lo per wccK. Kefcreuce triveu. Good pay lor 
pan time. Addivss with clamp, Mrs. Marion 
Walker, tAJuisvillc, Ky. 



WAN! ED— A girl lor (feuerai house work; 
tiimiiyol three. Call In forenoon. 411 
Ninth avenue east. 

^0(7 



SAXiAUi', tn) expenses In advance, 
allowed each mouth, steady em- 
ploy meiit ui home or travelinif. No sollcitiutr- 
Uuties ueliveriUK and maJuut; collecliuns. No 
postal curds. Address with stamp. Hater it 
Co., f iqua, Ohio. 



Doors open at 7:30; 
at 8:30. 



performance commences 



CHICHESTKR-S ENGLISH 

PENNYROYAL PILLS 

"^ pro CROSS DIANOND BHAND. 

Hare>iid alattja reliable. Ladles, 
a k Drugfdst for Diamond Brand, in 
r. d, metAlllc boxes, sealed with blaei 
ri ilxiD. T»ke so atber. AU pllU\ 
Id pasteboard boxes, piDk wrapper*. ar« 
di wceroBs countcrfelu. Send 4«. 
<s amps) for particulars, teslimoDials mod 
"I teller for Ladlea," in Uutr, hr retaiB 
■ all. Namt Paper. 
U Ickeator Ckcai-| Co., ■iiHsm gf., rUla„lk 




SPECIAL 



BAflGAINS 



AyANTED-Pastry c-ook. 



Inquire Phillips hotel. 



also other belp. 



w 

sc ^und 



ANTED — At the Womans Employment 



gills ana a Uozeu girls lor general 
house worK. Employ lueut obtained tree ol 
cost. Mrs. A. D. Ayers. 



for Sale. 

^ALE OF FCKNITUKE-Mr. E. T. RUey, 
O iH-lug aL)out to lua\ e the city, will ofler at 
pi ivulc suic, at his itsiaeni.e. No. tHi East 
cccoua street, upou Satuiduy, Jau. Ailh, truia 
10 a. m. to b p. m., ail his household f uruiture, 
carpels, kitchen uteusUs, etc., etc. 



160 Aces in 9-49- 1 6. 



80 



40 



320 



II 



9-49- 1 5. 



i-49-16. 



35-48- 1 5. 



ITTOU SALE— A heavy working team cheap 
JD at A. W. Eiiers an Lake avenue south. 

|j^UK SALE— Forty acres for sale, near the 
Xj ciiy, at *so per acres. Only Hum down; 
Liulauce on lime to suit purchaser. A gnsaX 
Liig sUiip lor somebody. Call ou Eriosou, birom 
ii Co., *il Paoloix'l-S.cusou building. 

i"^OK SALE— My resideuce with i*i or lOU feet 
ist ;>econU sii-ect. Terms to suit 
E. A. (jiltMjri, a lioard ot Trade. 

HEAVY UOUSES iXJK SALE— 16 head of 
heavy hoises, raised at Lake Parit, on 
iiie Northern PaciUc road, lorsaie by C. W. 
i^ai vey. Cuu oe t>eeu ai ilowaiM liaru, on the 
ittae shore, Minnesota poiul. ttcsiaeuce, JaSi 
West fourth street. 



Jb 

purchaaer 



LOST— Watch 
Finder will 



tuiuiug 
s.ieet. 



it to (i. X. 



Lost. 

charm. A. O. U. W. badg«. 
be iiiierally rewarded bi re- 
porter, 2 East Suiierior 



T JST— Part of a gold-link cuff button In 
jU shape of three rings. Lost in Superior 
Ol Duluth Finder win i-eceive lewaj-d by 
Icaviu^- the same at my office. Kobert it . Mc- 
Dowell, Si', V, est sup*, rior street. 



F 



t'ur KeuU 

OK RENT— Two warm, comfortable rooma 
terms. Apply £:i«i West 



i'.iehlguu -li-eet. 



^^Jli. KEN 1— DcBlmble room; 
steam, etc.; urivate family. 



tierata oUice. 



bath, gas. 
Address S., 



48 



80 

■15. 



Water Front, 



2 Grs nd Avenue lots. 

2 Lots on Central Avenue. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $1750. 



U anted— To Kent. 

WANTED-A furnished house for the win- 
ter. L. J. Taussig. No. W Phoenix block. 



Board amd JKooius. 



ri^^WO ROOMS, heated and lighted, with 
X. board, in a private family, l4.oo per week. 
li r'ourth avenue east. 



we! 



I Cottage House, with 
West Duluth, $1 180. 

I Coitage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $2000. 



FiniinciaL 

DULUTH MOKTGAOli LOAN COMPANY 
loans money in any amount ou furni- 
ture, pianos, horses and wagons without re- 
moval from owners possessiou ; also on ware- 
house receipts, liauk stocks, aud any property 
ol value; uoiesdiscounte.i; partial paymenu 
received ana your own lime grauied tor pay- 
=>ent; no delay; money ou baud ana fumwhed 
immediately alter seouriiy U approved. Wm. 
Horkan, Manager, iloum ti, Faiguason blook. 
Duluth, Miun. ^^ 



Terms on Houses, M Cash, Balance 
U and ii years ate Per Cent 



1 1 MILLS, 



IF YOU WISH TO SELL OK BUY DULUTH 
or Superior bauk slock, corporaliou or in- 
>i-stment securities, call ou or address li. Mur- 
phiu, broker, y iianuing block. Duluth. Mlna. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



^^ H. WILSON. ATTOiiNEY AND CX)17N- 

-L^ • sellor at Lrfiw. Will practice In State 
ana united States Courts. AU business given 
prompt atleutlou, 44 Fargusson Hlock, Duluth. 
Minn. 



P>LASTEK1NG. 

H, T. DlNHAlf. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobblns 
promptly attended to. Uttioe, room D, Hun- 
ter block. 



C, L LOVEn 1 CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. |410 AIIO 411 FI8ST UTIOIilL BANK BUILDING. 



"VrKS. J. 8. DLNWOODIB, 

I'eacher of Piano F*te, Voice and Sight Sin*, 
ing. Chorus and Choir Conductor. 

Music rooms at J. J. Wlggina's, 16 Bast Rn 
perior street, and at residence, 121 Tenth ave. B 



^\J[^' H. PABKBK ROBINSON. 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION. 
8 MILBS BLOCK. 



]W-CMILLEN & 8TKBBLN8, AJtCHITBCTB 



T-*s^^?S»*i*^^^ AHCH1TBCT8 






I 



IT'lill.RfjB pgg; 



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i .aj e ».:g3Lie. ' X ' j i L".. ' - 



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\ 



■ 




UULUTH EVJLNLNG HWRAl.ll JA2HVARX 23 1890. 



THAT FLOUR MILL 0[AL 



AN EASTERN VIEW. 



English Mill Owners Trying 

to Lease the Washburn 

Mills. 



That is Why the Washburn 

Crosby Company is Still 

Looking Here. 



Reports From Fiourdom of 

Probable Leasing of 

the Mills. 



About a week ago The Herald quoted 
a remark of C. C. Martin, a large stock- 
holder in the Waahburn Crosby Milling 
company of Minneapolis, stating that 
the idea of moving to Duluth had not 
by any means been abandoned, but that 
the company etiU had the matter under 

consideration. 

Since that time The Northwestern 
Miller has made tlie signiticant predic- 
tion that inside of two years there would 
be but two great milling combinations 
doing business in Minneapolis — one 
would be the Pillsbury-Washburn-Eng- 
lish syndicate combination, and the 
other would be all the other mills in the 
city amalgamated under one manage- 
ment. 

If what The Herald hears from Min- 
neapolis today proves true, and the 
authority given is the best in that city, 
this movement is taking form sooner 
perhaps than even The Miller antici- 
pated. It is now stated on very good 
authority that C. A. PiUsbury, as mana- 
ger of the English syndicate's property, 
has made an otFer for the lease of the 
three C C. Washburn mills now operated 
by the Washburn Crosby company. The 
offer, it was stated, was on the basis of 
8 per cent annually on a valua- 
tion of ;fl,03J,GJJ for a lease to run 
a term of years. This proposition 
was made to the Fidelity Trust com- 
pany of Philadelphia, which controls a 
large block of stock in the three C. C. 
Washburn mills, operated under lease 
by the Washburn Crosby company. The 
Trust company is now said to have the 
offer under consideration. The recent 
trip of C. A. Pillsburj- to the East is said 
to have been for the purpose of making 
this tender. Mr. Pillsbury denies all 
knowledge of such a deal, though he has 
"heard it mentioned." 

Of course the Hour market is dull at 
present and no one would care to lease 
more mills on the outlook for the next 
few months, but no one realizes better 
than the Pillsbury-Washburn combina- 
tion that any dullness is but temporary 
and that Tery stion every barrel ground 
will bring in its steady little profit as of 
yore. The Waahburn Crosby company 
leases the C. C. Washburn mills at a low 
valuation, and the claimed offer of the 
Pillsbury outtit is considerably in excess 
of what the present lessees pay. Look- 
ing at this side of the question, there- 
fore, it would seem that the owners 
would lease to the new people. But the 
Washburn Crosby folks have lately 
trimmed up their mills and put in a got)d 
deal of expense, it is possible that they 
might wish to re-lease at the higher 
terms. The affair is, therefore, in rather 
a mixed condition. 

If such a deal should be consummated 
the Pillsburj -Washburn-English syndi- 
cate would ctmtrol more than half of the 
capacity of the Minneapolis mills. The 
syndicate now owns the following mills: 
Pillsbury A,T(.!00 barrels daily. Pillsbury 
B. 250); Palisade, -2000; Anchor, 160i): 
Lincoln. Anoka, lOOO. The three Wash- 
bum mills are: Washburn A, 4200; 
Washburn B, 1300; Washburn C, 3C00. 
This would make an aggregate daily 
capacity of 22,6lXJ barrels of flour. The 
total daily capacity of the Minneapolis 
mills is 38,0CC>. Should the Washburn 
Crosby people come here the total daily 
capacity at Duluth next fall would be 
about 9000 barrels. 



He 



LAST NIG HTS LECTURE. 

Mr. Bardick Cit«t« a Model Town: 
Asks Pointed 4Jue>itioii!l. 

At Mr. Burdick's lecture last evening 
in the First Methodist church. He 
opened the service by reading the 23d 
Psalm, which was followed by prayer by 
Dr. A. W. Ringland. The speaker then 
said that temperance workers were 
charged with being people of one idea, 
which he denied. The difficulty is that 
people do not realize the hold the liquor 
traffic has upon societv. This he illus- 
trated by relating an experience he had 
with a young man who charged him 
with always liarping on one string, in 
which he showed by object lessons that 
there is hardly a vice which is not cause*^! 
and fostered by the liquor traffic. But 
why did not that young man see it be- 
fore? Simply because he was so ab- 
sorbed in business that he had not taken 
the trouble to look. 

Nine-tenths of the wickedness in any 
community would be wiped out if you 
blot out the saloon, said he. He then 
cited the case of the town of Alfred, N. 
Y., his home, where there has not been 
a license granted, nor has there been a 
saloon for fifty years. .\nd there, said 
he, is a town where there is not a pauper 
nor a criminal; no swearing and no vile 
stories are heard. Many dispare of re- 
form, and say you cannot enforce law 
against the traffic. There is not a man 
in Alfred center who could be tempted 
with any amount of money to sell or 
lease a property, for the purposes of a 
saloon. One of the greatest recruting 
agencies for the army of drunkards, is 
the social drinking habits at the home. 
The only remedy for this is to change 
the conditions. Drunkards never come 
out of the ranks of total abstainers. To 
keep up a saloon, there must be boys, 
they can't be run without them. We 
should keep the boys at home nights, by 
making it attractive for them. Many 
make and keep their homes so nice that 
there is no place within them for the 
boys, who are thereby driven into the 
street and thence into the saloon. The 
speaker caricatured the exquisitely nice 
home. There are too many homes that 
are simply prisons for the boy, and can 
one wonder that they seek the street and 
the saloon? When our homes are made 
attractive, then we have a great power 
against the saloon. 

"Young man," said he, "every nickle 
you put over the bar is at the expense of 
manhood. Have you asked anyone to 
sign the pledge or warned him of the 
pitfalls and snares which surround him? 
Can one tell of any place having more 
opportunities or need of carrying the 
message of salvation than this city of 
Duluth?" 

The labors of Mr. Burdick will be con- 
tinued this week and next, possibly still 
longer, and all are invited and urged to 
attend. In order to appreciate the man 
and his work one needs to hear him. 
His personality cannot be put into a 
brief report^ 



If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root & Co.'s ad. 




"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 



I 



Statements K«>giirdlnK the Chari;eH in the 
Duluth Land OHIce. 

The Providence Telegram speaks as 
follows of the late Eastern dispatches as 
to ine Duluth land office: 

There is a large amount of incoherent 
matter sent out from Washington about 
the Duluth land office. The allegation 
is made that that office is being used in 
the interests of a certain real estate firm 
that deals largely in iron lands in north- 
ern Minnesota. 

The government land that is within 
the Duluth district has upon it deposits 
of iron ore the tineet and most valuable 
m the whole United States. The strife 
for it is very eager. The officials at 
Washington ruled once — many years 
ago, before iron had been discovered 
there — that there wore no mineral lands 
in Minnesota, and that ruling holds good 
now. It follows that this mineral land 
can only be made available by acquiring 
a title to it under the homestead or pre- 
emption laws. Although it is in fact 
mineral land, and good for nothing else, 
it must be considered to be agricultural 
land and patented to "actual settlers" 
only. 

To acquire title the "settler" must 
swear that he has lived upon the claim a 
certain length of time, has farme<l upon 
it, etc. The absurdity of all this is ap- 
parent. A title cannot be gotten from 
the government to an acre of this valu- 
able mineral land without committing 
fraud. It is needless to say that fraud 
is committed, and that land is constantly 
being patented to ostensible home- 
steaders who never have lived on their 
claims, and never will live on them. They 
swear to a series of falsehoods. The 
government officials are perfectly well 
aware that technical fraud is constantly 
committed, and they know that the gov- 
ernment is primarily responsible for the 
fraud. 

This condition of things opens wide 
the gate for that peculiarly contemptible 
variety of pirate known as the pro- 
fessional coniestor, and the Duluth land 
office has constantly to hear cases of 
contests of claims brought by men who 
only hope to delay the issuing of patents 
long enough to induce bona tide claim- 
ants to buy them off. The present 
trouble in the Duluth land office arises 
from statements made by these land 
hyenas, and which the peculiar condi- 
tion of things there with respect to the 
acquiring of titles gives constant oppor- 
tunity for. They are egged on by a big 
corporation. 

The officials of the land office at Du- 
luth have withstood successfully the ter- 
rible pressure that has always been 
brought to bear upon them, and prob- 
ably this attempt to wreck them upon 
the shoals of official stupidity at Wash- 
ington will fail. They are competent 
officers and honest men — the register 
being a veteran who was shot almost 
into pie meat at Gettysburg. 

WEST END. 



GOESeYONTHEOTHLRSl 



Chicago's Plaint at the Corn 

Shipments via the 

Northwestern. 



Great Traffic That it 

Losing and Duluth is 

Gaining. 



IS 



General News Notes of Kather a Dall Day 
in Second Division. 

Every one should attend the race at 
the Parlor rink this evening, as it 
promises to be very interesting. The 
race commences at 9 p. m. At Twentieth 
avenue rink tonight the attraction will 
be a masquerade. Three prizes will be 
awarded, one to the gentleman and lady 
each wearing the handsomest costume, 
and one for the most comical costume. 

The West End Social club held its 
sixth reception at Normanna hall last 
night. It was well attended. The next 
reception is to be held Feb. 5. 

There will be special services at the 
Presbyterian Garfield avenue Sunday 
school, beginning with this evening and 
lasting during the remaining evenings of 
this week. 

Mrs. P. Anderson, who has been visit- 
ing with her son. Rev. A. B. Anderson of 
the Swedish Baptist church, for the past 
two weeks, returned yesterday to her 
home in Minneai>oli8. 

A. Christopherson went to Hinckley 
yesterday to visit for a short time. 

J. W. Cummings, wife and child re- 
turned yesterday to Hinckley after 
having visited here for the past two 
weeks. 

Mrs. C. B. Neimno left yesterday for 
Detroit to visit with friends for a short 
time. 

SACRED HEART CADETS. 

A New Temperance .Society Organized by 
Bishop McGolrlck. 

A meeting was held last evening in St. 
Thomas school for the purpose of organ- 
izing a cadet society. Great enthusi- 
cism was expressed among the boys and 
forty members were enrolled, after which 
the election of ofiicers took place. The 
following officers were elected for the 
ensuing year: Presideht, Henry Flynn; 
vice-president, George Shanley; secre- 
tary, Henry Murphy; treasurer, George 
Miller, This society will be known as 
the Sacred Heart cadets. Meetings will 
be held twice a month, at which literary 
programs will be given. 

The .Mule Must Go. 

The bob-tail mule is going, slowly, but 
surely. The Street Railway company is 
reducing its outtit of mules as rapidly as 
they can be disposed of and horses are 
being put on. As soon as the snow goes 
the bob-tail cars will be displaced by the 
new and handsome 16-foot cars. These 
changes will take place within a few 
weel^ now, and will be heartily appre- 
ciated by Duluth pedestrians. 

The Weather Today. 

Minnedosa, St. Vincent and Winnipeg 
were the three coldest Northwestern 
points this morning, the mercury indi- 
cating 22 below zero, with a rapidly 
rising barometer, which means increased 
cold. This morning at Duluth the 
minimum was 5' abwve zero, with a pros- 
pect of a small blizzard and increased 
cold tomorrow morning. 

I.o^ People in "The Little Tycoon." 

The beautiful opera, "The Little Ty- 
coon," IS to be presented at Temple 
Opera in a few weeks, by local singers 
under the training and management of 
Mra C. B. Nimmo. About forty people 
will take part. Mrs. Nimmo is now 
absent at Detroit, Mich., but will return 
in a few days and commence rehearsal. 
The proceeds will be devoted to some 
public charitable institution, not yet 
designated. 



The Mozart Soiree Mnsicale. 

The fifth soiree Musicale of the Mo- 
zart association of Duluth will be held 
in the Temple Opera house on Friday 
evening, 24th inst., at 8 o'clock. 

Admittance on membership cards, 
which must be shown at the door. A 
limited number of tickets will be sold to 
persons not members at $1 each. Said 
tickets (which admit only one person) 
can be had at Dwyer's music store and 
at the door. 

The program for this musicale will be 
made up entirely of home talent and 
by our best musicians, including Miss 
French, Madame Beauleau, H. P. Robin- 
son, Professor Tonning and others. 

Clan Stewart announce that their 
Bums Anniversary Banquet in St. Louis 
hotel on Friday first, will commence at 9 
o'clock sharp, when supper will be served, 
to be followed by the program a-* 
printed. Schillings full orchestra will 
furnish the dance music. Tickets for 
the whole entertainment iQ each, admit- 
ting lady and gentleman, may be had 
from members of the Clan. 



The Chicago Tribune quotes an article 
that recently appeared in The Herald on 
the very great quantities of corn passing 
East from Nebraska over the Soo and 
Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic rail- 
ways and their connection, the Canadian 
Pacific railroad. It is a hard thing for 
Chicago to see the corn trade going 
where the wheat trade has gone, and The 
Tribune makes a brave attempt to show 
that the reason is a {>oor one and is not 
in the line of sound business sense. 
Perhaps the railroads and those who are 
shipping corn this way have other 
reasons. Certain it is, anyway, that 
Chicago has lo3t her grip on the corn 
trade. Following is The Tribune's 
editorial on the subject: 

Great quantities of Nebraska corn are 
being shipped North to the Soo road and 
to the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic 
and thence East through Canada to New 
England. The volume of such traffic 
exceeds the capacity of the Canadian 
roads and a recent glut of freight is de- 
scribed: 

"The passenger trains from the North 
have been unusually late for some time 
past. The cause is an accumulation of 
freght at the Sault. As much as 10,000 
carloads of corn from Nebraska have 
been lying at that place waiting to be 
trans-shipped to Boston and other East- 
ern points. Every man who can run an 
engine has been given a freight train, 
and even passenger train conductors, 
after tiuishing their regular trips, have 
Ijeen pressed into running local freight 
trains before their next trip comes 
around." 

Lower rates of course explain why 
traffic passes from Nebraska East by way 
of the route through Canada instead of 
over the American trunk lines. Two- 
thirds of the 1800 mile haul is in Ameri- 
can territory and the total distance is 
considerably greater than overthe routes 
wholly inside the United States. The 
Canadian roads have greater difficulty 
keeping their tracks clear of snow and 
run through a country destitute of coal. 
Yet they make lower rates than the 
American roads, which run through coal 
fields from the Missouri to the Allegha- 
nies, and have no such trouble and ex- 
pense as their Northwestern competitors 
in keeping their lines open in winter. 
For two-thirds of the distance via Can- 
ada — from Nebraska to the Sault and 
from Montreal to Boston the traffic is 
subject to the "short haul rule." Never- 
theless the rate via Canada is from three 
to ten c.^nts per 100 pounds lower on par- 
ticular classes of .traffic than over Ameri- 
can routes. Rather than lower their 
short-haul rates to keep within a re- 
duced long-haul charge, the American 
roads surrender certain kinds of business 
entirely. 

THE PLAYERS LEAGUE. 

The ^bedule of the L'lul)» to be Made 
Public at Once. 

Pii'TSBUKO, Pa., Jan. 23. — An import- 
ant meeting of the schedule committee 
of the Players league opened this morn- 
ing at the Hotel Anderson. Chicago, 
Brooklyn, Buffalo, Cleveland and Phila- 
delphia are represented. The meeting, 
it is expected, will make out and pub- 
lish the schedule of the Players clubs 
for 1890. 

Heretofore the League and Associa- 
tion schedules have not been made pub- 
lic at so early a date, but the leading 
lights of the Players league are under- 
stood to consider it advantageous to put 
their dates before the public without de- 
lay, although in so doing, they may be 
enabling the opposition to make con- 
flicting dates. 

Sportini; Notes. 

Alexander Cuthbert of Belleville, Ont., 
designers of the cup challengers Atlanta 
and Countess of Dufferin, died last 
week. 

Ed. Crane, the Giants' big pitcher, is 
taking life easy in South Boston. 

Designer Burgess is at work on the 
lines of a centerboard 40-footer. It is 
reported that this boat is intended for 
E. D. Morgan, the well-known New York 
yachtsman. 

Glasscock, Denny and Boyle have de- 
clarecL a boycott against Ed .\ndrews 
and wTil never again play with him. Ed 
has been writing harsh things of the 
sensitive creatures. 

A prominent writer for the English 
press discusses the relative merits of 
the English and American bred racer 
as regards speed and staying quality. 
The Duke of Beauford gives the subject 
careful consideration, and states that he 
believes that American races are run at 
a faster pace than those in England, 
owing to the difference in climate. 

Lawley has the Sears composite sixty 
in frame. The new boat presented a 
very fine appearance on the stocks. The 
turn of the midship section is very easy, 
as this boat has less beam and more dis- 
placement than any of Mr. Burgess' 
previous boats. Her resistance will be 
small, and, as she will have considerable 
power, it is hard to see why she should 
not be a fast sailer. 

Albany and Troy are talked of as 
members of the Atlantic association. 
Local games in those cities drew largely 
last season, and with good management 
clubs of the caliber of New Haven and 
Worcester ought to pay without any 
trouble. v 

Philadelphia and Brooklyn are two of 
the largest as well as two of the best 
paying baseball cities in the country. 
Next season both of them will have three 
clubs, all in the major leagues. There 
is a possibility that all three clubs can 
live in each city, if the schedules were 
so constructed as to conflict on as few 
dates as possible, but this api^iears to be 
impossible, and in each case it promises 
to be a survival of the fittest. 

Jackson is expected to arrive in New 
York today and the sporting resorts are 
crowded with members of the fraternity 
who intend to go down to the pier and 
give him a warm reception. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 



Indian river oranges at Victor Huot's. 

Notice the new bargains offered in J. 
M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 

Don't forget the grand masquerade on 
skates at the West End Parlor Skating 
rink Saturday night. Everybody should 
mask, as there are three good prizes to 
be given away. 

I am offering a few good bargains in 
residence lots near where the fiouring 
mills are to be built. J. \. Booos, 

35 Farguson Building. 

Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accurate and prompt attention at 
The Herald Job Rooms. 



.\nother Fast Freight Line. 

Another new fast freight line between 
New England points and the Northwest 
has been organized. It is made up of 
the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic and 
the Omaha, the Eiistern Minnesota and 
the St. Paul & Duluth. It will be known 
as the Canada-Atlantic Fast Freight line. 
The new line has issued a tariff which 
quotes rates to St. Paul and Minneapolis 
based upon $1.05 first-class down to 
thirty-six cents sixth-class. 

KEEP RIGHT ON GUESSING. 



Seventy-five Dollars Cash to 

Closest Guessers on 

Duluth. 



Two Prizes Offered for the 

Contest; from Now to 

May. 



[Notice that all city letters put in the 
Duluth postoffice must have two cents 
prepaid, otherwise The Herald will not 
receive the guesses, for it will not pay 
postage on "guess" letters.] 

Keep on guessing, friends, for The 
Herald's two prizes! Bear in mind that 
the way is open till the census enumer 
ators begin their work, and that you can 
guess early, late and as often as you 
please. It is only necessary to clip a 
coupon from the paper from day to day, 
write your guess and name upon it, 
varying your guess at will, and turn it 
in to The Herald as directed by mail or 
messenger or personally. Lots of 
guesses have already been put in, but 
we look for thousands more. It is a 
very simple and easy chance to try your 
skill as a calculator or your luck as a 
guesser, and the prizes are well worth 
trj'ing for. Fifty dollars in gold for the 
best guess, and twenty-five dollars 
in gold for the next best. First 
come, first served with the 

prizes. Guess once and guess again. 

There has always been great interest 
attached to the figures of population of 
Duluth. This will be especially the 
Laae this year, as the last government 
census gave us a total of 3740 people, 
and it is almost certain that no city in 
the United States has ever shown such 
a percentage of growth as will Duluth. 

How many inhabitants has Duluth ? 
That is a question for the readers of The 
Herald to answer. By "Duluth" is meant 
the city projjer. West Duluth, Lakeside 
and Lester Park, all to all intents and 
purposes parts of the city. 

The Herald proposes to make it an 
object for its readers to guess as to the 
number of people in the city and the 
three adjoining suburbs mentioned 
above. In brief, The Herald will offer 
prizes to the two persons guessing the 
number or nearest the number of 
inhabitants shown by the returns 
of the census enumerators. The Herald 
will give to such successful guessers two 
cash prizes. 

First Prize $50 in Gold, Second Prize $3.'S 
In Gold. 

Guesses will be received at this office 
until the day when the enumerators of 
the census begin their work. 



Population Contest Coupon. 

My guess as to the number of inhabltaiita • 
'■ In Duluth. West Duluth, Lakeside and ; 

■ Lester Park to be shown by returns of tlie ; 
• census enumerators in tlie summer of IHIH) \ 

■ is as follows: :' 
: Whole number of inhabitants — 



: Name of guesser — 

: Residence of gnesser — 

Date. Jan. 23, 1890. 

Cut out this coupon, make your gruess upon 
it and send it to The Dally Herald. All g-uesses 
must be made on this coupon. Only one Kuets 
allowed to a BiuKle coupon. In case there shall 
be two or more answers of the same number, 
which number is nearest or next lo nearejit 
that returned by the enumerators, then the 
winners shHll be, in either case, the ones whose 
coupons Itear the earliest dale. 

Address all answers to 

"QUBSS " care The Dally Herald, 
Duluth, Minn. 

Mqy Swerve as a Guide. 

In order to give data that is of interest and 
may be of value. The Herald reprints the tol- 
lowinR- from the directory report of lb»W, but 
it must be remembered that this paper does 
not voucli for tli«! accuracy of the opinions #et 
forth or the fljf ures (riven : 

This volume contains ;),:)tl9 more names than 
the last issue; a total of Ifi.'^i adult citizens of 
Duluth: this sum multiplied by 2%, the factor 
which has been found to truthfully represent 
the women and children not included in the 
list, indicates a population of 46,9a«J for Du- 
luth, a gain of IO,UUU inhabitants within a year, 
and the prediction is ventured that if a lull, 
complete and accurate count be made by ei- 
l>erlence<l and competent canvassers, nearly 
wi.oiiit souls will be found within the corpo- 
rate limits of Duluth in l^M. 

Population by Years. 

18S0, United States census 3.470 

IKS"), state census 18,0110 

1^86, directory estimate 22,000 

INH", directory estimate .y. 3ii,OU0 

18««, directory estimate .37.IHJU 

18W>, directory estimate 47,"AiCi 



B 



R 



O 



T 



H 



E 



R 



S 



R 



O 



W 



N 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restaufants, 



—AND— 



TAKE NOTICE! 

We are agents for the celebrated 

Creen Point Chioa 



The B«»t In the World. 



Get our prices and vou will be per- 
fectly satisfied. 



19 West Superior Street. 



I 



. - ..t.iL.m . ' <■■ ^ 1 I 



-»» J 



.JL 



' ^ l . i . ' *. i .J 'MII fl I 




R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 

Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
^ kinds of furs a specialty. fi^Good workmdi- 
■^ ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



■mSQIp^ 209 East Superior Street, 



Duluth, Minn. 



MEMBERS OF THE 



DULUTH GLEARIM HOUSE ASSOCIATION. 



Annerican Exchange Bank 
Bell & Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bank 
State Bank of 
National Bank 
Marine Bank 



of Duluth 

Duluth 

of Comnnerce 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
. 100,000 
1.000,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
260,000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

10,000 

I 00,000 

26,000 



LA GRIPPE 



A Few Pointers. 



Persons who have a cold are much more 
likely to take the Influenza or so called la 
grippe. 

It is much more severe when accompanied by 
a cold. 

The most critical time Is when recovering 
from the disease, as slight exposure will often 
cause a relapse, and that is almost certain to 
end in lung fever or pneumonia. 

The feet should be kept dry and warm, the 
body well clothed and care used to avoid ex- 
posure. 

The bowels should be kept regular, and per- 
sons physically weak should take quinine to 
keep up the vitality. 

With these precautions and a free use of 
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy a prompt re- 
covery is reasonably certain. That remedy is 
unequalled for a severe cold, and this disease 
requires precisely the same treatment. For 
sale by Boyce & Totman. 



HUMPHREYS' 

I)B. Huai'iiREVii' Si-KiiKios art- BcU'Dtlflcally and 
carefully preiiarcd prcwrlptions ; u.sed for many 
years In private practice with success.and tor over 
thirty years used by the pi-ople. Every single Spe- 
clOcJs a Bpt-clal cure for the disease named. 

These Specifics cure without drugging, purg- 
ing or reducing the system, and are In fact and 
deed the Bovereiirn remedies of the World. 



UST 
1 



OF PRINCIPAI. NOS. Ct3RE.a. PRICES. 

Fc»er», Congestion, Inflammation... .3A 
WorniH, Worm Fever, Worm Colic . ,'iS 
t'ryiUK Collr, or Teething of Infanta ,'ii 
Oiarrnea, of Children or Adultx ... ,-ii 
DyBenterv, flrlplng, Bilious Colic. . .'25 

Cholera MorbaH, Vomiting 'ii 

CoBKfas, Cold, bronchitis 45 

Nenral|[ia< Toothache, Faceache 



Id 
11 
1'^ 

u 

15 

1§ 
19 

•Z4 

il 



HeadarheMi Sick Headache, Vertigo 

f>yapep8ia« Hlllous htomach 

HuppreBiied or Painful Periods. 

Whites, too I'rofuse I'erlods 

CroDp, Cough, DlfTlcult Dreathing 

Wait Kheum, F.rjRlpelan, Eruptloug. 
RheumnlJHm. Kheomatlc Pains — 
Fever anil Aenr. Chills, Halarlu — 

PIIph, ^n-rA or Weeding 

Cntnrrh, Influenza, ColdlntheHead 
WhoopinK ('ought Volent Coughs. 
(irneral nehilii>,; nyslcalWeakneas 

Kidney O imp a He ... 

Nervous Debility 1.1 

Irinary Wenknpss, 'Wetting Bed. ." 
l>i»ea»e» of the Heart, Palpitation 1. 



Sold by Druggists, or sent postpaid on receipt 
Of price. Dk. himi'HREVS' MAN'ti,, (144 pages) 
rlchlv bound In cloth and gold, mailed free. 
Humphrcyn' .>ledictneCo.U'& Fulton 8t. NY. 

SPECIFICS. 



<fc Q nn Best Set 
5) O . U W» "of Teeth. 

CULLUM, 

Painless Dentist. 

Itoom 1-7. 4'«i West Superior Street, 
F»r(ru88on Ul >ck. Duiuth 




A. FITGER & CD'S 

Lake Saperior Brewery 

Is the largest In the State of MId tesota ou side 
of the TwIi Cltlei 



NEW HOTEL. 

^THE 




St. Paul, Minn., 

C«r. 4tb and IVavhinf^ton S(«. 

On Cable Car Liuc. Best Table iu the Norto 
wesu llaies JS.OOand Ipwardf. 

W- U. Babnzs. Manager. 



Mortgages Negotiated. 

6 AND 7 HER CENT. ^ 



Lowest rates for ail sizes and grades of 
security. Before borrowlngr elsewhere In- 
quire of 

N. J. UPHAM, 

Under First Nat. Bank. 
NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



HARWOOD'S 

City Transportation Freight and Express. 

DRAYS. 

Office, 17 Firet Avenue West. 



WANTED ! 



Purchasers for 



Tlifee Valuable and Nice-Ljing Lots 



V 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



-:- WILL BE SOLO VEBy CHEAP -:- 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFfCE 

17 First Avenue West. 



SCHILLING'S ORCHESTRA 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 



ROOM 4U PASIOREMIENSOI BLOCK, 

DULUTH, - MINN, 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY. 



MINNESOTA. 



First class In every wav. Newly refitted. 
Fiucst sample room Id town. Livery in 
eonnectlon. WILI lAM QRANT, Prop. 

Open November I . 



A BAmi 



A LOT 



-IN 



BLOCK 12, 



-ALSO- 



Iliree Good Boilding Lots on Hinth Street, 



I 


















i 




k 




i 






1 


1 

1 

1 




! 

i 




' 



Near Third avenue east 



' 



All these are well located and very accessible, 
(aood schools and graded streets close by. 



\ 



Apply by letter or in^person to 



"ED," 



Ci^i^IBE SIEIS-^ILjID- 



CAUTION 




L 




MICHIGAN STREET, 



FOR SALE 



-AT- 



Below Mafket Mce 



FIBE INSURANCE. 



THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



Stfictlj FiEst-Class in all Ippointments. 



T^. Li. Dougiae' name and the prtoe 

are stamped on the bottom of all Shoef 

_ _ _ _ adverti-sed by him before leaving hL 

factory; this protects the wearers against high prices and inferior ^jo6s 
If VOL r dealer does not keep the style or kind vou want, or oflers you shoes withou 
W. ]li. Douglas' name and price stamped! on them, and says they are just a> 
good, do not be deceived thereby, but send diroct to the Factory for you can ge. 
what ^-ou want by return mail, postage paid. Dealers make more profit on un* 
know 1 shoes that are not warranted by anybody; therefore do not be induced to 
buy siioes that have no reputation. Buy only "those that have W. Li. DoUK'la^ 
name and the price stamped on the bottom, and you are sure to get full value for 
jour money. Thousands of dollars are saved annually in this country by the 
wearers of w . li. Douglas' Shoes. In ordering by mail state whether you 
want Congress, Button or Lace, London cap toe, plain French toe, or narrow cap 
toe, and be sure to give size and width you wear. I can fit any foot that is not de- 
formed, as my shoes are mad*; in a great variety of widths, sizes and half sizes, I 
guarantee a nt, prompt delivery and perfect satisfaction or money refunded upon 
return of the shoes in good condition. w. i>. DOUGLAS, Brt>ckton, Ma 




^•^^ 



\%.«^ 
-^f'^'^ 



W. L. DOUGLAS 
$3 SHOE cen^t^Smen. 

Is a fine seamless ralf shoe, with DonKoIa 
tops and Oak l^eather botfoinB. They are 
nia<le in ConKress, liiitton and Laee on Lon- 
don Cap Toe, Narrow Cap Toe, and Plain 
French Toe L,aetK, in sizt'H from 5 t4> 11, in- 
cludinj; linir siz<-a and in nil width". If you 
Iiavt> Ix-cn |>:t.vinK from SS to MM for «ho<^s 
ofthiH ijuHlity do notdo ito long-er. One pair 
will wear as lonK as two palr« of common 
Bho<>a sold by d«^al<-r» that are not warranted 
by the manufactnrer. 

Our <'Iaiinii for this shoe over ail otiier S3 
■hoes advcrtineil, are : 
lit. It contains b<-tt<>r materiaL 
Sd. It is more stylish, better flttln«r and 

durable. 
3d. It ffivfs better frenenU satisfactton. 
4th. It <'OKlsroore ni€>ney to make. 
5th. It savf'SinoremoneyfortheconsnmM'. 
6th. It Ih sold by more dealer* throughout 

the U. S. 
7th. It's i^reat success is diie to merit. 
8th. It cannot be duplicated by any other 

manufaotur»-r. 
9th. It iH tb<! bost in the world, and has a 
larger demand than any other 93 
shoe advertised. 






If taken at once. 



Lot sold next 
property for $335. 



this 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



WHITE BEAVER'S 

(glGH(REAM 



HEALS DISEASED LUNGS. 



DRUGGISTS SELL IT 



T, H. SPENCE, LA CROSSE, l¥/S. 

Great French remedy. Dr. LeDuc's per- 
iodical Pii,i.8, from Paris, France, act only on 
the ircncrative orfrans in females and posi- 
tively cures suppression of menses (from what- 
ever cause), and all perimiical troubles pecu- 
liar to women. A safe, reliable remedy, war- 
ranted to excite menstruation or money re- 
funded. Should not 1)0 used during pregnancy. 
The larRc prorMtrlion of the ills to which ladies 
are suiijcct is the direct result of a disordered 
and IrrcRular menstruation. Rfjbt. Stevenson 
4 0o.. Chicago, 111. H. Boswarth & Co., Mil- 
waukee. Wholesale Airts. Tlie trenuine only 
supplied by Boyce * Totman, Sole Agts., Du- 
luib. 



Address 



L.S., 



9B O >0 will be paid to any person who will prove the al>ove statements to be vntme. 
Tie Following Lines will !><> found to l>e of the Same Quality of BzoelleiMe. 

CKNIINE HAND-sEWKD, which takes tlie plaoe at cus- 
tom-ma le shoes tliat cost from $7 to f<). 

THK ORIGINAL AND ONLY HAKTMSKWKO WELT 

S4 .SHOK. Kquals custom-made sliocs costing from $btO$&. 

roK rOLICEMF.Jf. Railroad Men and Letter Carriers all 

wcartheri. Smooth inside as a Hand-Sewed Shoe. No Tacks 

.)r Wax Thread to hurt the feet. 

IS r>'KXrELLF.I> FOR HEAVY WEAR. Best Calf Shot 

for the price. 

WOKKI WOMAN'S. Is the best In the worid for rough wear : 

uric p.ur ought to wear a man a year. 

IS EQU.4L TO SHOES THAT COST FROM S3 TOSSUtO, 

One pair will wear longer than any shoe ever sold at the price. 

FOR BOYS is tlip best School Shoe In the world. 



85 .00 SHOE 
$4.00 SHOE 
S3. 50 SHOE 

82 .50 SHOE 
82.25 SHOE 
82.00SHOE 
82.00 SHOE 
.75 SHOE 



YOUTH'S SCHOOL, gives the small Boys a citance to 

the best shoes in the world. 



PostofTice Box A A. 



XI made in Congress, Button and l^ce. 

W. L. DOUGLAS $3 AND $2 SHOES J^m. 

Both 1 .adies' Shoes are made in sizes from i to 7, in:ludiiig half sizes, and B, C, D, E siid EE widths. 

STYLES OF LADIES' SHOES. 

•♦The French Opera," "The Siianish Ar«-h Opera," "The American Common- 
Sense," "The Medium Common-Sense." All made in Button In the Latest Styles. 
Also, French Opera in Front Lace, on 93 Shoe only. 

Ci nsumers should remember that W. L. DOUGLAS is the largest and only Shoe Manufacturer 
In tht world, supplying sboea direct from factory, thMgivingall the middle-men's profits to the 
^leuti ^"^ ^ l>OU<U«A8> Brockton, Maaa. 

FOR SALE BY SUFFEL&'CO. 

O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Rooms 510. 511 and 51?, Dulutli Union Kational Bank Building. 



r 



)M 



IT 



i 



r^ 



iT 



I 



I 



:i^ 



\ 



\ 



I 





mj JLUTH BVBNIIJ^G HERAIJ): JA^STTJABY 23, 1890. 



WOeiD OF COMMERCE. 



The Course of Prices in a Dull 

Market on Duluth's 

Board. 



Large Shipments 
Much Coarse 



of Corn; 
Grain 



Expected Soon. 



PERSONAL. 



The wheat market was rather quiet 
today, with no features of any import- 
ance to atTect prices. In other markets 
there was more attention paid to corn 
and oats, which bulj^ed up considerably, 
than to wheat. Cables were steady, ex- 
ports were light. 

May here opened the same as yester- 
terday's close, advanceil'a. dropped back 
%, recovered Kj, eased off and closed ^^ 
below the oi>ening. Cash No. 1 hard 
closed at TSi*, No. 1 northern 70. No. '1 
northern 73, January No. 1 hard 78^2. 
No. 1 northern 76, all nominal. May 
openet.1 at 83,^. sold up to 83^g, declmed 
to 83 "4, advanced to 83)2. teased ^^ •'^d 
uloeed at 83^s bid, May No. 1 northern 
dosed at 80^2 ^i^- 

The Dailr Movement. 

Carson track: Wheat 4. Inspection: 
No. I northern wheat .5; oats 10. Re- 
ceipts: Oats, "ii,;^?*) bu. MinneaiKjlis 
cars, 132, against 116 yesterday, and ±27 
a week ajfo. Receipts there, 88,160 bu. 
Shipments: Wheat, 44,660 bu; tlour. 
20,9yi,> bu. Exports from the seaboard 
were only 14.572 bu. Chicago received 
22,224 bu of wheat and shipped 16,523 bu, 
and Milwaukee received 17,843 and ship- 
ped 1100 bu. 



Mrs. R. Hall left today for several 
months' sojourn in San Francisco. 

Mr. O. C. Hartman left last night on a 
business trip to New York and Boston. 

Mr. S. A. Thompson of The News has 
gone to Battle Creek sanitarium for the 
benedt of his health. 

Alderman James Dingwall is ill, and 
may not be able to take part in the ap- 
proaching mayoralty contest. 

Miss Bird Pray returned last night 
from Black River Falls, where she had 
been to accompany home her sister, who 
has been ill for some time. 

Glenn Roebuck, a nephew of George 
McKee, was taken violently ill last night 
and died within three hours. He was 
the only son of a widowed mother. 

Mrs. George of St. Paul, president of 
Minnesota of the Womans Relief corps 
arriveil in the city yesterday to look 
after the Duluth corps of that order. 

Bridge Engineer A. P. Boiler of New 
York, who is to estimate the cost for the 
proposed bridge across the canal, is ex- 
l)ected iu the city the last part of this 
week. 

Hon. J. P. Milne, Crookston, a former 
resident of Duluth, ia in the city, the 
guest of Jacob Liaux. Mr. Milne was 
greatly surprised with the progress Du 
luth has made since bis departure.in 
1872. 



fBllM WEST DULUTH. 



Talk 



IS 



the 



Already 
Coming 
Election. 



Lively 
Village 



on 



Corn Sbipmentii. 

Twenty-nine cars of corn were in- 
specteil out of elevators yesterday for 
shipment East. Nearly all the corn now 
in store here will be shipped to the East 
via the Duluth, South Shore Jt Atlantic 
within a short time. Enough more will 
come to till before the opening of navi- 
gation. It is also probable that quite a 
quantity of oats will be received here 
and shipped East by rail in the next few 
weeks. The movement of coarse grains 
East over the Zenith City line shows 
that the roads running to this city with 
that line are becoming most aggressive 
competitors with the Chicago lines for 
the traffic of a large portion of the corn 
and oats regions to the southwest of 
Duluth. All the corn coming here is 
brought in by the Eastern. 



ItesUter Kesame. 

At The Spalding: Thomas Driscoll, 
Jamestown. N. D.; John Landberg, T. 
H Mix, Minneapolis; Perrj* Landis, T. 
R. Emenling, H. M. Dickey, Joe Crosling, 
Chicago; John S. Cu,ddity, Red Jacket; 
W. B. Crass, Marquette; J. G. Boes, 
Philadelphia; A. B. Cole, Grand Rapids; 
C. W. Miche,New York. 

At the St. Liouis: A. Thomas, R. h.. 
Dawson, C. A. Moulton. Vincent; O. 
Herbert, Cloquet; H. Joseph, New 
York. 

At the Merchant6: Jamee Hurley 
Pine Cily; C. J. Wall, Chicago; James 
A. McCoskey, St. Paul; H. Moody, Bar- 
num; Dan H inly. Tower. 

CITY BSIEFS. 



An 



Engine 
General 



Company 
Notes of 
Town. 



Meets; 
the 



Ne«r York .Mocks. 

The following are closing prices on the 

New York stock exchange as reported by 

W. W. Bill A Co.: 

Vester- 
day. 



Today. 

Chioa^i, BurllDirton & Quiacy. 107 

Ameru-un I'utton Oil S8 

Missouri P;M.-itic 75^ 

Nortberu P»citle preferred 741» 

ChieaiTO, Milwaukee Jc St. Paul.. t»<^ 

Sujrur I'rust oo'-t 

Gas Trust 47 

Louisville Jt XashvlUe 84»i 

CbicitKo JK Northwestern Ill 

Bock Uiand m^ 

Lake Shore Hip 

Beading 3l«i» 

Tenn. eual and iroa 865 

Richmond Terminal 2H, 

Atchis<}a ;?ii, 

Delaware * Lackawanna 13B' J 

New EntrUnd 44i 

LeadTrust 2114 

Western < niou 85 

UniuQ Pacltlc «;\i 

Wisconsin Central 34?i 

OU lOB^ 



V4^4 
74'. 

6.x -^ 
56>it 
47'ji 
St>"a 
111 
H6S 

m^ 

38 

21 

:J1S 
137 

■sus 

84 

^S 
107 14 



Tbe Minneapoliii Close. 

MlXNE.\POHs,.Ian. if-Closinir uuotatlons— 
No. 1 hanl. 79; February, 79: 

May, s-i'^; on t' ' < .. No. 1 northern, 

January. 77: 1, j, 77; Mav. 7!<\; on 

track, ..',2*77^*. .No. a northern, January. 73; 
February 73; May. 77S,:on truck. 7a(&76. 



Chif»so CloHe. 

Chicaoo, Jan. 2J —1:1.5 p. m. close-Wheat 
firm: January. 7tj j; February, 7«>j: May, St.!',. 
Corn. flrLuur; January. 'S\; February, JSt'j- 
May, $i. 



The LowtT Court. 

At the police court this afternoon P. 
J. Krupp, whose case has been pending 
acme little time, and was fined §1 and 
coeta for assault in the third degree, the 
total amount being 811.29. 

A civil case that ia attracting a good 
deal of attention today, is one in which 
Anton Schulte of the Minne- 
sota Home figures in. This time 
he is the defendant, The com- 
plainant being Richard McGuire. 
The latter it appears bought the furni- 
ture and good will of the hotel, three or 
four days before he took possession, and 
when he came to do so found a quantity 
of the furniture had been abstracted 
The whole business is a muddle, and 
there are about a score of witnesses- 
young and old— on both sides. J. B. 
Cotton is conducting the plaintiff's case 
and S. D. Allen is council for the de- 
fendant. 

ANOTHER GONE WRONG. 

A. School Uistrict Treiuurer who Clears out 
Tl'itta tbe Cash. 

Last night the officers of Pike Lake 
township about fifteen miles back of 
town were scouring Duluth and Supe- 
rior for School Treasurer Nolan, who had 
suddenly left town with |8iU of the di - 
triot's money. He was seen in Duluth 
by several but was traced 
across the bay and was there 
lost sight of. Nolan is a 
farmer, and has lived for some time at 
Pike lake. He has been building a new 
house, and this taken with other facts of 
the use of a good deal of cash led neigh- 
bors to think he was using more money 
than he ought to. About two weeks ago 
Wm. McCrimmon of the school board 
accused Nolan of appropriating funds, 
and the latter did not deny the charge, 
but wanted time to return the money. 
Ex-Chief of Police Jeff Daaiels and 
John McCormick are Nolan's bondsmen, 
and are fully able to stand the loss, al- 
though it will come hard U> pay it out. 
It is still quite possible that they may 
recover from Nolan himself. 

The funds of the district were for- 
merly kept in Bell Jc Eyster's bank, but 
there is nothing there now, and a few 
days ago Mr. Nolan applied to the bank 
for a oony of his old bank b(x>k and 
vouchers, claiming that he had lost tne 
documents. Banker Bell issued a du- 
plicate bank book, but the vouchers 
were not re issued. 



A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank 
Bowles yesterday. 

J. Pilkey has gone to Ashland on a 
trip in the interests of the music busi- 
ness. 

^ There is a case of scarletina at 321 
Seventh avenue east, the 1-year-old son 
of Mr. and Mra W. Murray. 

A concert is to be a feature of the 
public opening Duluth Music company's 
new wareroom. The affair will be purelv 
local. 

.\bout seventy-five couples were in 
attendance at the Fourth assembly ball 
last night at The Spalding. It was a 
highly enjoyable affair. 

The d^ocratic caucuses and conven- 
tion in the Second ward will be held in 
Strate Bros.' store instead of James 
McBeth's store as formerly announced. 
John Garvin, a vagrant, was committed 
for seven days this morning. Sam Swan- 
son and Archie McDonald both plead 
not guilty to the charge of drunkenness, 
were remanded to jail for trial this even- 
ing. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office, Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
11 below; 3 p. m.,3 below; 6 p. m., 3 
above; 10 p. m., a' above; 7 a. m.. 'j 
above; 9 a. m., 4' above; 12 m., 7 
above. Maximum, 7" above. Mini- 
mum, 11 below. Daily range, 18\ 

There were tiled yesterday with the 
secretary of state at St. Paul articles of 
incorporation of the Vermilion liange 
Lumber and Iron company, which, 
strange to say, has its headquarters in 
.Minneapolis. Capital stock is .i<kH.),i)(Xi. 
The incorporators are Levi Howlan, Fort 
Howard, Wis.; Charles Lampson, Sev- 
our. Wis.; Roscoe W. Gilkey, W. J. 
Mondhan. Green Bay, Wis., and Frank 
C. Laird of Minneapolis. 

The organization of the Fredonia, N. 
Y., Land company, including in its 
officers Messrs. Green and Mixer, who 
are both well known in Duluth, where 
they are owners of Duluth realtv, has 
been effected. The company has" pur- 
chased twelve and a half acres of land 
in Buffalo, which is di\1ded off into 
building lots. 

Frederick R. Green has been appointed 
one of the board of managers of Fredonia 
normal school. xMr. Green is the popular 
cashier of Fredonia National bank and a 
heavy owner of Duluth real estate. He 
was unanimously recommended by the 
surviving memuers of the board. 

It is said that a free fight occurred in 
one of the St. Croix bagnios last night, 
in which several of the inmates were 
more or less battered. One woman was 
bit in the neck and another was pounded 
severely in the face. 



The village election'occurs the second 
Tuesday in March, and the buzz of the 
political bee is beginning to be heard in 
the land. As usual, some of the candi- 
dates that are least desired, are first to 
present themselves. Several members of 
the vilhige council are sicJk, and it is 
thought that there will not be enough 
present this evening to form a quorum. 
The meeting will probably be adjourned 
until Saturday evening. 

Dr. Rockwell has been elected vice- 
president of the Wisconsin Land associa- 
tion, a company latelv organized with a 
capital of §100,a)0. 'the company will 
operate in timbered lands in Washing- 
ton and Oregon. 

Fr.ink Cowen who has 'wen tempo 
rarily employed at Bell A Eysters bank 
for several weeks, is again filling his old 
position of book keeper for R. C. Brophy. 
Janitor Smith finds business pretty 
quiet at the village hall. He has had no 
prisoners to care for since Jan. 1.1, and 
the empty cells Ijespeak good conduct 
on the part of the citizens of the town. 

George Yeager who cared for his 
brother during his short illness, and who 
faithfully follo've<l his remains to the old 
home in Ohio, returned from his sad 
journey last evening. With his mother 
lying ill at home, and another brother 
at St. .Marys hospital, he is 
worthy of the deepest sympathy of the 
entire community. 

J. E. Fairbairn, foreman of the soft 
foundry at the Car works resigned his 
position last evening, and will leave for 
the East in a few days. Mrs. Fairbairn 
leaves this evening for Kansas City Mo., 
to make a visit among friends. She has 
been active in church and society work 
during her short stay here, and will be 
greatly missed. 

George Davis, foreman of the Cf)n- 
struction shop at the Car works, has 
been quite sick for several days. 

Emil Zanft returned last evening from 
a month's visit to Baraboo, Mich. 

The chemical engine company met last 
evening pursuant to call, with president 
Williamson in the chair. Thecommittee 
on constitution made a report which 
was accepted, and the constitution wa.*; 
adopted. B. C. Dent offerea his resigna- 
tion as secretary, which was accepted 
and M. L. McMinn chosen to succeed 
him. E. McCormick was elected (Second 
engineer. .\ committee, consisting of H. 
P. Smith and M. L. .McMinn, was ap- 
pointed to recruit the membership of tl e 
organization. It is desired to bring the 
membership up to a total of twenty-five. 
Mrs. E. R. Thurber is very sick with 
congestion of the lungs. 

The firm of Downs A Manson has 
dissolved partnership. Mr. Downs will 
continue the business. Mr. Manson, 
whose health will not permit of active 
work for some time, will remain in West 
Duluth for the present. 

H. P. Smith, president of the chamber 
of commerce, has received a communica- 
tion from James Torry of St. Louis, 
president of the national convention of 
commercial bodies, asking co-operation 
in behalf of the Torry bankrupt bill now 
before congress. 




O 

o 

DC 
UJ 

Q 

oc 
O 

O 

h 

co 

I- 
z 
< 

Q. 



-until stock 




Will continue Fifteen Days — uniu siock is re- 
duced. Cost or worth cuts no figure. WE 

MUST REDUCE, even at a great loss. 

Our low prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business Existence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides, 
you would not stop to read them, but will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

$7.49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $1 5. 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ I 8. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishing Goods. No reserve We must reduce 
our stock at least $i 5,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mild weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us to take* the loss. Call and see 
our prices. 

M. S. BURRO WS3& CO. 



o 
o 

id 

of 

MX 
Q 
CC 
O 

O 

»- 

CO 

D 
CO 




k-mm 



i 



■/ 



GLASS BLOCK STORE. 




POLLING PLACES. 



See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. M.\uK.AKL.\:<E & Austin. 



BoundaritrH ol' Wards auid Frecinrt.H and 
Where to Rasister. 

Below are given the places of registra- 
tion for the municipal election that is to 
take place on Feb. 4 next. 

First ward— As!i Dallcy's lumber olBco. 

Second ward— MoBetL's jfrocery store. East 
SuiH-Tior street. 

Third wiinl, first precinct— All territory east of 
La c avenue to Third avenue east. PoU- 
\ag place. No. 13ti East First street. 
Secxxid priHiiiict— All territory l>«twecn Third 
avenue east and Sl.vth tiveuue east. PoU- 
Ini; place, J£i East ^uporior street. 
Third precinct— All territory lietween Sixth 
avenue oast and Tenth av"nue east. Poll- 
injr place, corner of Superlo* street 
and Washington avenue. 

Fourth wanl, first precinct— All territory be^ 
tween Lake avenue and Third avenue west 
uortli of the First ward limits. PolliuK 
place, Howard building. ll-J West First 
street. 
Second precinct— All territory between 
Third avenue west and Sixth avenue west. 
Polling place,41!t West SuiKTior street 
Third precinct— All territory between Sixth 
avenue west and Twelfth avenue west 
Polling place, "01 West Superior etreet. 

Fifth ward, first preclncl— All that part of 
Fifth ward north of Northern Pacific rail- 
road yards and east of (iarfleld avenue. 
Pollini • 'ace, IHOa West Superior street. 
Second •inct— All that oart of Rices 

Point sji "1 of Northern Pacific railroad 
yards. P ' ling place, tfW (JarHcId avenue. 
Third preciDot— All that part of the ward 
west of Garfield and Piedmont avenues 
and north "f the Northern Pacific railroad 
yards. Polling place, litti West MlchlKan 

Sixth ward— Polling place. No. 2SH West 
Michigan street. 



Mortgage Sale. 



PARK POINT NEWS. 



A Wedding Last Night; Much Sickness 
anti One I>eHth. 

Last evening Frank Thomas, son of 
Alderman Thomas of the Second ward, 
was married to Miss .\nnie (ireen of 
Park Point at the home of 
Rev. E. M. Xoyes performed 
mony. The happy young i>eopIe left at 



WHEREAS. DEFAULT HAS BEEN MADE 
In the cnndltlons of a certain mortgage, 
executed and delivered by Mary Sherwin and 
Elijah t). Sherwin, her husband, mortgagors, 
to AlonjMj J. Whltcman, mortgagee, dated the 
eleventh day of October A. D.. 18S7, 
and duly recorded in the office of 
the register ot deeds of the county of 
Saint Louis and state of Minnesota 
on the tweuty-eiglith day of November A. D., 
Ih87, at nine o'clock a. m.. In book 23 of 
mortgages, on page 13, such default consist- 
ing ol 1 lie non-payment of tlie principal and 
interest moneys secured by said mortgage, on 
which said mortgage there is claimed to be due 
at the date of this notice the amount of 
five thousand six hundred and thirty-five and 
iVi-ino (*.5,ti;i).."w) dollars, principal and interest, 
and no action or pnjcetiding has been insti- 
tuted at law or inequity to recover the debt 
secure<l by said mortgage, or any part thereof; 
and 

Whereas. said mortgage was duly 
assigned by the said Alonzo J Whitemau, 
mortgagee, to Augusta Lettau, by assignment 
dated the second day of Noveml>er A. D., IK^V, 
and recorded In the oflico of the register of 
deeds of tlie county of St. Louis in the state of 
Minnesota, on thetwentj-eighthday of Novem- 
ber A. D.. 1^87. at !• o'clock a. m.. iu lx)Ok P of 
mortgages, on pagt> 377. 

Now, notice Is hereby given, that 
by virtue of a i>ower of sale contained in said 
mortgage, and of the statute in such 
c...se iiuuie and provided, said mortgag<> 
will be foreclosed by sale of the mortg ged 
premises tlierein descrll)ed. at public auction, 
at the front lioor of the court house, in the city 
of Duluth, in the county of St. Louis and state 
ol Minnesota, on .Monday the twenty-seventh 
day of January A. D.. ISXi, at ten o'clock In 
the forenoon, to satisfy the amount 
which shall then be due on said mortgage, with 
the interest thereon, and costs and expenses 
of sale, and seventy-five dollars attorney's 
fees, as stipulated In said mortgagt; In case of 
lorecloeure. 
I The premises described in said morgage, and 
so to be sold, are the lots, pieces or parcels of 
■ land, situate in tlie county of St. Louis and 

^, , ., I state of Minnesota, and known and described 

the bride. ' as follows, to-wit: 

the cere- ' ^,^"* "umber thirteen (Hi) and fourteen (U) in 
block number nine (it), Portland division of Du- 
luth, according to the recorded plat thoi-eof on 



PM pya cfl„ 



WEATHER FORECAST. 

Jan. 23. —Forecast for Duluth 



and 



vicinity for 24 hours comnwncinQ 10 a.m. 
today: Colder; fair weather. 

Observer, Signal OflSce. 



COAL 



CROSS CB[[K LEHIEH, 

Fi)[E eUfllING, 

AUTifiilClIE I BlIUMmOUS, 




Dry Maple. 
Hard Mixed, 

Slabs. 
Edgings. 



CONNELLSVILLE 
y GAS HOUSE. 



COKE 



10 o'cl(x;k last evening for a brief visit | file in the offic-e of jhe register of deeds in and 

Louts 



CANT SEE^M TO SUIT. 

A Tow n that is .Most I'ulucky iu IU Choice 
of Names. 

For several years the little village of 
Grand Rapids, at the head of upper 
river navigation on the father of waters, 
carried on a quiet existence nine months 
of eveiy year. Its leading men, the 
saloon keepers, never got any letters, so 
there was no trouble about the mail. 
The town consisted of three saloons, 
two boarding houses, one l)lack8mith 
shop, one store and one bar», but earlv 
in the spring it became for a few weeks 
the headquarters of a few thousand 
hustling, swearing, drinking upper xMis- 
siflsippi woodsmen, who made the place 
as near Bedlam as it could well be 

When the Duluth & Winnipeg was 
begun last year (irand Rapids had to 
have a new name, so it got it. The auto- 
crats of the postoffice didn't like the se- 
lection, so of course it could not stick. 
It was changed and became Akeley, 
about as poor a name as could be chosen, 
but Cfjpied from the Akeley Lumber 
company which had big interests near 
there. But that would not do, those re- 
publican postoffice people showed their 
sense by refusing to name the postoffice 
-\keley. So Saginaw was taken as fourth 
choice. 

Now comes the news that Saginaw 
isn't any more pleasing than the rest, 
there is now a Saginaw, Mich, and West 
Saginaw, and Saginaw, Minn, and Sagi- 
naw, Mich are too much alike to be 
proper. So the denizens are casting 
about for a new name. They'll prob- 
ably clinch the matter by gettiog some 
unpronounceable Indian word. 



Assignee Sale. 

I will sell the stock of gent's furnish- 
ing goods, of the firm of Maegher &. Ken- 
nedy, at or below cost, for a few days. 
C. H. IIoYT, Assignee. 

Around the World. 

There was a time when a man who had 
circled the globe was a nine day's won- 
der, and if dime museum managers had 
existed then, the traveled individual 
would have been exhibited as a "freak.'" 
Now such a voyage is so common that 
we have ceased to regard the world's cir- 
cumference of 25,(M.I0 miles as anything 
large. But distance can be measured in 
another way— by the difficulty and ex- 
pense of overcoming it. The Burlington 
system of railroads has 7000 miles of 
track. Do you realize what a lot of rails 
it would take to string out 14,000 miles 
in a single line"/ How much money they 
would cost? How many great cities and 
thriving towns you would pass in travel 
ing that distance? Buy a ticket over 
the finest railrod in the West, and in- 
vestigaf^e. For information more in de- 
tail, call on any of the Burlington agents, 
or those of connecting lines, or write to 
W. J. C. Kenyon, Gen. Pass. Agent C, 
B. A N. R R, St. Paul, Minn. 

East End Skating Rink. 

David N. Morison, champion fast 
skater of Duluth. and W. W. Brown, 
champion fast skater of Wisconsin, will 
skate three races at above rink on the 
following dates for |50 a side and a gold 
medal to be given by the rink, Friday 
evening, Jan. 24th, distance, three miles; 
Tuesday evening, Jan. 28th, distance, 
three miles; and Thursday evening. Jan. 
30, distance, five miles, the one winning 
best two out of three races to be declared 
the winner. Judgee to be selected on 
the ice. Walkers military band will be 
in attendance. 



in St. Paul and elsewhere. 

Little tJertie Halverson died yesterday 
of lung fever, probably the result of the 
prevailing epidemic. She was sick but 
a short time. The funeral will occur 
tomorrow afternoon at 2 o'clock. 

There is much illness on the Point, a 
great share of it colds and attendant 
fevers. 

The people are in a quandary as to 
how they shajl vote. It seems the ques- 
tion of Park Point being in the city is 
not yet settled and no one appears to 
know just what to do. 



for the county of St 
Dated December 3rd. 18-9. 

AUGL'STA Lettait. 
Assignee of Alonzo J. Whlteman, 
Mortgagee. 
W ALTEB Ayers, 
Attoruey of Augusta Lettau. 
Assignee. 
Dec. 13. 19, ::a, Jan. 2, 9. 16, 33 



mm PROMPiiy d[li»[R[o 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



DUJL.1JTH. 



jyCIISTN. 



•t 




OUR GREAI CLEmNCE SIILE 



Previous to stocktaking still going on. Extra- 
ordinary Bargains are being given in 
every department. 




8 



GIGANTIC BARGAINS 



FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY. 



8 



u 



2!icEacli Ctiildfen'sllotoeaf, 25c Each 

Your pick of 18 Dozen Children's Natural 
Wool, Sanitary Wool and Scarlet Wool Under- 
wear, worth 39c, 45c and 50c each. 

Take Them While They Last for 25c Each. 





83c [(ich. Ladies' kk\m\ Only 89c 

31 [)ozen Ladies' Sanitary and Fine Ber- 
lin Woo Underwear, Jersey Fitting, best fin- 
ished. Sold all over the city for $ 1 .25, $ 1 .35 
and $1 .39. 

OUR PRICE, 89 CENTS. 



Oict : Hotel SL Louis, 326 W. Superior St 



Tl 



YARD: 
or Street i 
hird ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Qarfield Avenuv, 
Rices Point. 




rtG, 




WANTFD-Compotent grlrl for general 
housework In small family. Apply 141)9 
Bench sirt-et 



The Weather Bulletin. 

Meteorolotrlcal renort received at 
Minn., 8 a. m. Jan. 33, 1890. 



AloL.Nd .M.^N willing: to work can find an 
evenmjr Job by apply ingr to the circula- 
tor. Herald otBce, between 3 and 4 p. m. 

UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Duluth 



PLACES. 



Bar 



Duluth |:w.OS 

Pt. Arthur. !3fl.»H 
Winnipeg- . 
St. Vini«nt 
Q'Appelle.. 
Asslnlb'ne 

Helena 

Huroa.Dak 
St. Paul .... 
La Crosse. . 
Bismarck. . 
Moorhead . . 



.■»).40 
30.31 
30.. M 
31) 36 
30.3)1 
:» 60 
;io.u 

:W.14 
30.62 
:W.13 



Ther. Wind Rain. 



4 

10 

-22 

-14 

— 8 
-18 

- 2 
-12 

12 

30 

-18 

-12 



8W 

W 

NW 

N 

NW 

8W 

8W 

NW 

W 

8W 

NW 

NW 



.30 
.08 
T 
.13 
.2» 



T 

22 
.10 



Weather 



Cloudy 

["loudv 

Cloudlc8.s 

Cloudles.s 

P't cloudy 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 

Snow 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 



T in rain column indicates trace One (1> 
inch of nUn or melted snow equals ten dO) in- 
ches of snowfall. Minus (—) in temperature 
column Indicates below zero. 

W. H. Fallow, 

Seroeant Slfmal Corps 

Duluth, Jan. 23.— LocaZ forecast for 
twenty -four hours, ending 10 a. m. Jan. 
Ji: Colder, fair weather. 



Northern PiMsiflc Short l.lne. 
OCLUTB TOSCrPKRIOK. 



Except Sunday. . 
Except Sunday.. 
Except Sunday . . 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday. . 

Dally .„ 

Daily 

Daily 

Dal!y 

Daily 

Except Sunday.. 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday.. 



Leave 
Duluth 



8 30 am 

7 3fi am 

8 55 am 
10 00 am 
1136 am 

110 pm 
215 pm 

8 36 pm 

3 30 pm 

4 00pDi 
4 35 pm 
6 40 pm 

6 46 pm 

7 15 pm 

9 2&pm 
11 10 pm 



Leave 
W. Sup'r 



6 45 am 

7 56 am 
» IU am 

10 16 am 

11 nO am 

1 28 pm 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 46 pm 

4 16 pm 

4 60 pm 

5 56 pm 
7(10 pm 
7 30 pm 
9 46 pm 

U27pm 



Arrive 
Superior 



652 am 
8112 am 
9 17 am 

10 22 am 

11 57 am 
135 pm 

2 37 pm 

3 47 pm 

4*25 pin 

4 57 pm 

6 02 pm 

7 07 pm 



327 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

GROUhO FLOOH, 

OPPOSITE ST. LOUIS HOTEL. 
Offers the following 

ACRES AND LOTS 



SIO Eli Seal Caps Onl) StO U. 



From now until Feb. I we offer our et. 
stock of Ladies' and Gents' REAL SEAL CAPS, 
wcrth from $12.50 to $16.50, all at the 
form price of $ 10. 

Quality and Style Guaranteed. 



ire 



uni- 



}\ 



! 



isami 



-IN— 



116.3 pm 




B. 



JES LAYIN' LOW. 



They had the Cream 
"Creiite" 
The Herald several 
that tliere was liable to 



Care to 



and I>on't 

weeks ago stated 
be wjir between 



repreaentativeB of cyclopaedias. The 
war seeni8 to have come. The Wiscon- 
ain ayents of the Britannica have been 
located in Superior, and before the Min- 
nesota aKents, located at St. Paul, 
realized the situation the Wisconsin fel- 
lows had sold thirty or forty sets of that 
eipenbive work here. 

When the Minnesota people sent their 
atrenis here they foufid the Held thor- 
oughly tilled and the demand dead. 
There are now critninations and recrimi- 
nations and threatened exposures, in the 
midst of all which the Wisoousin agents 
are following the advice of Brer Remus, ; 
jea lay in' low an' say in' nulHn, while 
they are counting the cash captured 
from under the noees of their somnolent 
St. Paul brethren. 



>, 



Indian river oranges at Victor Huot 

If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



Fe<xlor V. Luerzer, artist from Mun- 
ich, V lenna, has opened studio in In- 1 grand 
galls block, ro«juj IX His pictures are 
on e.xhibition at LaVaque's. where full 
information can be obtained. Terms for 
painting lessons in oil, water colors, etc., 
one lesson, three hours, seventy five 
cents; one lesson weekly, 82.i73 
month. 



Skating Race Postponed 

At West End Parlor Skating rink. 
Twenty-first avenue west and Superior 
street. The race between the Misses 
Bertha Stevens, Carrie Kennebrook, 
Annie McKee and Mattie Lester, which 
was postponed last evening owing to the 
extreme cold weather, will take place 
Thursday, Jan. "23. This will be an in- 
teresting race and all should make it a 
point to attend. The ladies will skate 
ten laps around the rink for a prize of 
io. Race called at 9 o'clock. Music by 
French band. Come one, come all, and 
see the four little ladies skate. Admis- 
sion: (Jents, 2o cents; ladies, 15 cents; 
children, 10 cents. Don't forget the 



per 



masquerade on skates Saturday 
night. Everybody should mask, as there 
are three good prizes to be given away. 

T. M. Ekickso.n, Prop. 
Capt. S. G. Johnson, Manager. 




LU 

H 
< 

CO 
LJJ 

< 

UJ 

q: 



o 

Ui 



o 

CO 

u 
o 

z 
u 
o 
z 
o 

Q. 
CO 
Ui 
OC 

cc 

o 

O 



SUPERIOR TO DULTTTB. 



Leave 
Superior 



Leave 
W. Sup'r 



Daily 

Except Sunday. .. 

Dally 

Except Sunday. . . 
Except Sunday... 

Dall>- 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday . . . 

Dally :;.... 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday. .. 

Dally 

Except Sunday.. 



00 am 



6 46 am 

7 07 am 
7 40 am 

8 10 am 817 am 

9 26 am I 9 32 am 
10 4'> am ! 10 65 am 
1105 am; 11 15 am 
13 36pmi 13 42 pm 

146pm| 162 pm 



2 50pml 
4 05pmi 
6(l6pm| 



610 pm 

7a0pm 

1146 pm 



3 00 pm 

4 16 pm 

5 12 pm 
610 pm 

6 17 pm 

7 30 pm 
1152 pm 



Arrive 
Duluth 

7 05 am 
7 23 am 

7 66 am 

8 35 am 

9 48 am 
II 10 am 
11 30 am 

100 pm 
2 07 pm 
316 pm 
4 30 pm 
6 30 pm 
6 26 pm 

6 36 pm 

7 46 pn. 
1210 am 



St. Paal * Duluth Kallroad. 



I eavo Duluth . . . 
Arrive St. Paul.. 
Ar MlnueapollB. 

Ar Stillwater 

Ar Milwaukee... 

Ar Chicatrf) 

ArSt. Louis 

Ar Kansas City . . 



go 5 gg •• 



8 00 am 
2 30 pm 

2 65 pro 

3 30pni 

4 15 am 
7 CO <tni 
6 06pD 
4 46pn 



I 

of 



210 pm 

t)i6& pm 
7 20 pm 
7 06 pm 
6 46 am 
9 30 am 
6 06 pm 
445pm 






SUPERIOR 



500 Acres at Haywood Sta- 
tion, on line of Omaha, with 
800,000 feet of pine, at $7 
per acre; one-half cash. 

280 Acres in sections 4 and 
5, tp. 47, at $ I 7 per acre. 
2 Lots on West Sixth street. 

10 " " Eighth " 

Block 7, West 15th street. 
■< I << (i (• 

Block on East 23d street; 
very cheap. 

I have a deal in acres that 
will take but S600, in which 
there is big money. Come and 
«ea me. I have the exclusive 
sale of the above. 



Ou[$2.5Dy. Glove-Fitting Coiset $1.25 

For this sale we offer our Glove-Fitting Cor- 
set, the G. B., in Cardinal, Blue, Black, Red, 
White and Pink. 

lyiS IS A GIGtmiC BARGIIIII AT lUi Regular Price, $2.50. 



25cPerPair. WOOL HOSE 25 Cents 

I 000 pairs Ladies' Wool Hose, worth 
35, 39 and 45 cents. 

YOUR PICK for 25 Cents 



lOOOpm 

6 66 am 
715 am 

7 00 am 
t7 06pm 

moopm 

am 

8 46 am 



tBxcept Sunday- to other points 4ally. 



Notice the new bargains offered 
M. Il(K)t & Co.'s ad. 



in J. 



Highest of all in Leavening Power.— U. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, iSS^ 




Baking 
PoMder 



STATE OP MINNESOTA. 
County of St. Louis. 



rsa- 



ABSQIJUTEi:^ PURE 



District Court. Eleventh Judicial District. 

Iu the matter of the eat^ite of Frank Diandrea, 
insolvent. Order for limiting time to file 
rt-loafes. 

Upon reading and flllnff (he petition of 
."^Iniou Clark, ri-ceivpr In the above entitled 
matter, and it u|ip<-arin(r to the court that 
creditors of Kiaiik Diandrea are reiiuired to 
Ule leleaws before participating in the bene- 
Hts or i^aid estate. 

Now therefore. It Is onlered that all creditors 
ofcaid Frank lliandrea dcHlrln^ to participate 
111 tliedlvMeiid;; of .said estate l>e, and are 
hereby n-quire<i. to lllo tbelr duly e.vocuted 
leUases wuh the Clerk of the District Court of 
the Elcvt nth .liidicial District on or liefore the 
auh iliiy ot February. A. IJ. I^Wt. 

That due notice of this order l>o given, bv 
IiuMi!sliiiig tliebamo three tlin«!s withlri live 
day.s fttjm the dale hereof. In The Duluth 
Kvinlnjr Herald, and by mailing a copy of 
tbi.s notice to each of the known crtMlltors of 
.=al'I Frank Oiundrea. 

Dated Duluth, Minn., .Tan. 2:lrd. A. D. 1890. 
By the Court. 

U. P. Stkahs, Judge. 



Duluth.ISoath Shore and Atlantic. 

LeavesDuluth dally 930pa 

Arrives Kepub'c, Mich 8 37 am 

Arrives Ishpeaiing, Mich 726am 

Arrives Negaunee, Mich 735am 

Arrives Marquette, Mich 806 am 

Arrives Sault Ste. Marie. Mich 1 36 pm 

Arrives Ottawa. Ont 1146 am 

Arrives Montreal. Que .330pm 

Arrives Boston, Mass ' 830aai 

Airlvcs New York, N.Y 7 00 am 

Arrives Detroit. Mich 11 10am 

Chicago, HU Paal. Minneapolis ft Omahs 
BaiIw<kT. 



GREAT ENGLISfl REMEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 



$1 COMFORTERS $1 

For three days we offer 500 Comforters 

WORTH $ 1 .50 Each for $ I 




-ftvJIr, Mnrk. 




A guarantee 
vous disease 
Memory, Loss 



cure for all ner 
euch as Weak 
Brain Power, 



;Kx Sunday 



Leave Duluth j 1045 am 

Leave West Superior...! 11 10 am 

lx>ave Superior I 11 30 am 

Arrive Stillwater j 6 32 pm 

ArrlveSt. Paul 800pm 

Arrive Mlnneatmlls | A 40 pm 



Daily. 

10 00 pm 
10 25 pm 
10 36 pm 
7 00 am 

6 66 am 

7 36 am 



•y, 
Hysteria, Headache, Pain In the 
Back, Nervous Prostration. 
Leucorrhoja, Universal Lassi- 
tude, Seminal Weakness, I m po- 
tency and general loss of power 
of the Generative Organs;— In 
- . either sei, caused by inrtiwre- 

VfcwTHdaft tlon oroverea^ertlon. and which 
ultimately lead to Premature Ti«4«Ba>S> 
Old Age. Insanity and Consump- 
tion. It.OO or a box or six boxes 
for 16.00. Sent by mall on re- 
ceipt of.'prloe. Full partlcalars 
In pampblet^ent free to every 
applicant. We Uaarautee 8ix 
Boxes to cui^ any case. For 
every 16.00 order received, we 
Bend Biz boxes, with a written 
guarantee to refund the money U.j-. 

If our Specific does not effect a cure. Address 
all communications to the sole manufacturers 
THE MUKKAY MRDiriNBCt) 
„ . Kansas CItj-, Mo 

«o1rt In linlnth br M«» WIrth 



50c DRESS 




50c 



Your pick of 32 pieces Dress Goods, 
all kinds, worth 75 to 90c. 

WHILE ra UST ONLY 5 CENTS Pfli « 







Leave Duluth 

lA-ave West Superior. . . 

Leave Superior 

^ rrl vc < 'hippewa Fails. 

A rri ve Eau Clalro 

Arrive Madison 

Arrive MllwaukiK! 

Ai rive Chicago 



Chi 
cal. 



lo- 
ally 



10 45 am 

11 10 am 
II 2ii am 
6 10 pm 

6 60 i>m 
1 39 am 

7 40 am 
T 00 am 



Trains arrive at Duluth. 
Fix)ni Kan Claiiv. and Chii 
FiomSt.Paul 



laliv. and Chii'ago 

jiand Miiineupulls TOOan 
Gboroe M. Smitb, Qen' 



Dally. 
6 2Spm 
am & 6 26 pm 
•1 Agt., 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 



REAL ESTATE, LOANS 



INSURANCE 



Room* 1 , 2, Exchange BIdg. 



$1,25 SHOES NOW $1,25 

Forthissale we offer 50 pair Misses' Dull 
Dongola Opera and Common Sense Lasts, 
slightly discolored, otherwise all right. 

REI3ULAR PRICE $2.25, now $ 1 .25 



? 




Come early and secure the bargains. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



D 



ANIOH WATSON 



4 — ■ ■■ 



^<«r 



J9€ 



*•- - r Til ■«» 



:r— i c 



3=ca 











? 




1 


F T 






1 












• 










A 


Lot on Central Avenue, 


in 


Block II, for $3300, 


foi 


• a few days 




E. C. HOLLIDAY. 




Hotel St. Louis BIdg. 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 



*;* •^k. 



A large list of Endion division 
lots cheap. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 W. Superior Street. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILOINO. 



VOL. 7; ]SO. 251. 



DULUTH. MINN.. I lllDAY, JANUARY 24. 1890. 



PBIC£ THB££ CENTS. 




PH'NION & WATSON 



GLASS BLOCK STORE. 



IDUJL.XJTH:, 



Miisrisr. 




OUR CHEAT CLEARANCE SALE 



Previous to Stocktaking still going on. Extra- 
ordinary Bargains are being given in 
every department. 



3 GIGANTIC BARGAINS 3 

FOR FRIDAY AND SATURDAY. 




IkM Childfen'sUndefweaf, 2&cEacti 

Your pick of 18 Dozen Children's Natural 
Wool, Sanitary Wool and Scarlet Wool Under- 
wear, worth 39c, 46c and 60c each. 

Tab Ttiem We Tliej Last fof 25c Eacli. 



u »- nr- 



89c Each Ladies' Undeiweaf Only 89c 

31 Dozen Ladies' Sanitary and Fine Ber- 
lin Wool Underwear, Jersey Fitting, best fin- 
ished. Sold all over the city for $ 1 .25, S 1 .36 
and $1.39. 

OUR PRICE, 89 CENTS. 



$10 Each, Seal Caps Only $18 Each. 

From now until Feb. I we offer our entire 
stock of Ladies' and Gents' REAL SEAL CAPS, 
worth from $12.50 to $16.50, all at the uni- 
form price of $ I 0. 

Quality and Style Guaranteed. 



Ouf $2.58 G,B.GIove-EittingCofset $1.25 

For this sale we offer our Glove-Fitting Cor- 
set, the G. B., in Cardinal, Blue, Black, Red, 
White and Pink. 

THIS IS J GIGAIIIC BARGim AT Jl ,25. Replar Price, $?.50. 





25cPEiPai[. WOOL HOSE 25 Cents 

1000 pairs Ladies' Wool Hose, worth 
35, 39 and 45 cents. 

YOUR PICK for 25 Cents 




$1 COMFORTERS $1 

For three days we offer 500 Comforters 

WORTH $ 1 .50 Each for $ I 



50c 




GOODS 50c 



Your pick of 32 pieces Dress Goods, 
all kinds, worth 75 to 90c. 

WHILE THTK LAST ONLY 50 CEHTS PEByARIi, 



S. 



$1.25 SHOES NOW $1.25 

Forthissale we offer 50 pair Misses' Dull 
Dongola Opera and Common Sense Lasts, 
slightly discolored, otherwise all right. 

REGULAR PRICE $2.25, now $ 1 .25 



Come early and secure the bargains. 



\ 



■ 



PmON&WAISON 



LAST EDITION. 



NK fROM VKSHIIIGIOII 



Sentiment in Regard to Annex- 
ation; Free Coal for 
Free Iron. 



In Congress; Dressed Meat In- 
quiry; Celebrating 
New Year. 



General News of Interest From 

the Government's 

Seat. 



Washington, Jan. 24.— S. J. Ritchie, 
Ohio, api)eared before the ways and 
means comiuitteo and argued in favor of 
the free importation of Canadian min- 
eral ores and in favor of unrestricted rec- 
iprocity with the Dominion. 

The chairman, (havinj; n3<'ertained 
that Mr. Kitchie was conversant with 
Canadian matters), inquired what the 
sentiment was regardini; the annexation 
of Canada. Mr. Ritchie replied that any 
sentiment could be found in (.'anada 
which anybody wishetl for. There was 
considerable sentiment in favoj of reci- 
procitj, and, by taking the proper course 
the Uniied Hlates could increr.se the 
sentiment. Mr. Carlisle asked wliether 
Canada would give the United Slates 
free coal if the United States gave her 
free iron. Mr. Ritchie rephetl emphati- 
cally in the affirmative. Hon. B>?njamiu 
Butterworth of Ohio addressed the com- 
mittee in support .of his bill for reci- 
procity with Canada. 

In the Uoii)t«. 

Washington, Jan. 24. — In the house, 
on motion of Mr. Grosvenor of Ohio, 
the house insisted on its amendment to 
the senate bill for the removal of ob- 
structions from the Missouri river, and 
a conference was ordered. Mr. Walker 
of Missouri, from the committee on 
commerce, rep<jrted (^and the house 
passed) the senate bill authorizing the 
construction of a bridge across the Mis- 
souri river within one mile north or one 
mill southeast of the mouth of the Kan- 
sas river. The liouser then went into 
committee of the whole (Mr. Burrows of 
Michigan in the chair) for (he further 
consiileration of the customs adminis- 
trative bill. 

The M<^at IiivestlBHtloii. 

Washington, Jan. '.M.— The meat pro- 
ducts investigating committee, of which 
Senator Vent is chairman, resumed its 
sessions this morning. The committee 
has ooncluded its inquiry into every- 
thing except the railroad branch of the 
investigation, and the meeting this 
morning was for the purpose of ques- 
tioning aa to rates and facilities govern- 
ing the transportation of cattle and 
dressed beef. Senator Vest will soon 
begin the preparation of the report of 

the committee. 

Oenerouii >iew York. 

Albany, N. V.. Jan. 24.~-The World's 
fair bill was introduced in both houses 
of the legislature today. It was hnally 
agreed upon by the executive commit- 
tee, which consists of Mr. Depew, Mr. 
Whitney, Mr. Root and other dis- 
tinguished gentlemen. The bill does not 
tax the people of the state §1. Not a 
cent is to be taken from the state treas- 
ury. All the money will be furnished 
by the city of New York. The measure 
wdl undoubtedly be passed early next 

week. 

New year's in WasliinRton. 

Washington, Jan. 24.— The Chinese 
New Year was celebrated at the legation 
in this city by a large dinner party, at 
which only gentlemen were present 
owing to the fact that the minister's 
wife does not yet take part in social or 
official entertainments. 

The festival was further celebrated at 
midnight by a peculiar ceremony incident 
to the occasion. At 12 o'clock the secre- 
taries and attaches of the legation, 
headed by the minister, as- ondod 
to the roof of the lega 
tion, where they remained for 
some time going through a mystic per- 
formance known as moon worship in the 
Celestial calendar. A marked difference 
in their manner of depicting the moon 
IB that instead of the proverbial man in 
the moon they invariably represent as 
the presiding genius a sagacious rabbit 
in the act of knocking fruit from a tree 
of many branches. 

Mr. Pung, secretary of the present le- 
gation, is quite an artist and has made a 
number of drawings descriptive of the 
prowess of this agile rabbit in the moon. 

Contested Klections. 
Wa-shington, Jan. 24.— The house 
elections committee was in session only 
tive minutes today and did not attempt 
to pass on the West Virginia contest of 
Atkinson vs. Pendleton, which had been 
set down for tinal disposition. The case 
of Smith vs. Jackson, which has already 
been reported to the house, will be called 
up for consideration by that botly next 
Wednesday. Next week will be devoted 
to hearing arguments in the contested 
elet!tion cases of Mudd vs. Compton 
(Fifth Maryland) and Threat vs. Clark 
(First Alabama). 



EPISCQP ALS P ROTEST. 

Hinhoii Hare Sa.V" tt i» Kl){»«t t" l'»e 
Kerinent«<l Wlue. 

New\okk, Jan. 24. -The protest of 
Bishoi) W. H. Hare of the Protestant 
Episcopal diocese of South Dakota; 
against that section of the prohibition 
bill now before tlie legislature of that 
state, which prohibits the use of wine 
for sacramental purposes in churches, 
promises to attract national intert^st 
among members of tiie Episcopal and 
other dcnnminatione. 

Prominent divines and members of 
the laity who have l^een interviewed in 
this city, denounced the clause in the 
bill in question in no measured terms, 
and express surprise that the Womens 
Christian Temperance union and the 
State I*rohibition league should array 
their forces against the church and in- 
sist upon the clause being retained. 

The bishop's protest is based upon the 
argument that, according to Biblical 
writ, the use of fermented wine at the 
altar for sacramental purposes, is right 
and proper; and it is probable that, 
should the promoters of the bill decide 
to persist with the clause iu question, a 
movfmt'iit will bo set on foot to hold 
meetings throughout the couiitry to up- 
bold Bishop Hare in his pi)sition. 

ROW I N SQC tETY. 

Tin- Foster Fauulj \V ill Not be Proftcrlbed 
by Ottawa Society. 

OriAWA, 6nt., Jan. 24.— Fifty promi- 
nent leudert) of society, including several 
senators and member.s of p.irliaineni, 
accompanieil by their ladies, will attend 
the dinner party to be given tonight by 
lion. George ti. Foster, the minister of 
finance. In doing so they will be in- 
directly expressing their condemnation 
of the action of Lady Stanley in failing 
to invite Mrs. Foster to the state dinner 
on the night of the opening ot parlia- 
ment. 

This is another feature of the pro- 
scription of the Foster family, growing 
out of the marriiige in Chicago of Mr. 
Foster to his preseiU wife, who had 
shortly before been divorced, the laws of 
Canada not legalizing such a union. The 
outcome of tonigiifs banquet will prob- 
ably be the formation of a new society 
set in Ottawa, and which will proscribe 
not only Lndv Stanley, but also Mrs. 
McDonald, the re<il leader of S(x;iety. 
Foster's pluck in defending his wife is 
admired even by his opjxjnente. 

BOTH CHA RGE A DULTERY. 

Itaron aiitl Ijuly Torphiohen Aecuse Ka«-li 
OUier of Adaltrry. 

New York, Jan. 24.— The case of Baron 
Tori,hicheu,an English peer.who seeks a 
divorce from his wife on the ground of 
her adultery with a lieutenant in the 
First Battalion York and Lancashire 
regiment whose name is unkniuvu, came 
before Lord Traynor sitting in the court 
of sessions today. 

Lord Torphichen has broughta counter 
action against the noble l^aron, charging 
that in August and September last, he 
was guilty of adultery with a woman 
near Rugby, and that during the yeara 
188T-'8S, he kept a niistress at his castle 
at D unchurch lodge. 

Both parties have many friends in the 
United States having made several trips 
across the ys-ater. Evidence was sub- 
mitted today with the view of showing 
that her ladyship had entertained the 
i?ay lieutenimt both at her mansion and 
in a house on Mortimer street, London, 
where tliey lived for a week as man and 
wife. Lady Torp.'iichen is but 29 years 
of age, and very handsome. 

THE SMALLE ST PR AYER BOOK 

Ever I'riutfil in tlu- World Sent to America 
Froiu Oxford l^ulveritlty. 

Nkw Yokk, Jan. 24.— A copy of the 
smallest Episcopal prayer l>ook in the 
world was received here from London 
today. It comes from the Oxford Uni- 
versity press, which about a year ago 
t rned out the smallest Bible that the 
universe had ever seen. The present 
volume, in lim[» binding, weighs *4 of an 
ounce, is only 1 inch iu breadth, 3).^ 
inches in length and ^^ oi an inch in 
thickness. 

It consists, however, of 670 pages and 
comprises the whole of the of the Epis- 
copal prayer book, printed in small but 
clear type. Accompanying it is a still 
smaller edition with the calendar and 
occasional services omitted. A regis- 
tered holder enables ladies to affix the 
lxK)k to their chatelaines wlnle gentle- 
men can carry them in their vest pock- 
ets. ^ 

HAS HURT THE I NDUSTRY. 

The Seizures of Itritlsli .Sealers U»m Hurt 

That l'ir:Uliiir Trade. 

VicTOKiA, B. C, Jan. 24.— The legisla- 
ture has convened. The speech from 
the throne was read by Chief Justice M. 
B. Begbie, Lieut.-Gov. Nelson being ill 
with the grip. The revenue of last year 
exceeded the estimate by 20 per cent. 
The outlook for gold mining is promis- 
ing. Aid for the construction of rail- 
ways to open the mining aistricts will 
be considered. The speech states th.it 
the "protection of our people in the 
exercise of their rights in the Behring 
sea and iudemnitication for the past has 
l>eeri kept Ijefore the Dominion govern- 
ment, and although delay has been hurt- 
ful to the sealing industry, and trying to 
those who have been deprived of their 
property, there is reason to hope for a 
speedy settlement.'' 



FfiOM W[ST 




The Council Meets; The Cloth- 
ing Firm's Schedule 
of Debts. 



General Business and Personal 

News of the Lively 

Burg. 



Notwithstanding the sickness of some 
of the members of the village council, an 
adjourned meeting was held last even- 
ing. Tht* roll-call found President Boyd, 
Recorder Molea and Trustee McCuUum 
present. A resolution was introduced and 
adopted rescinding a former resolution 

which provided for the issuance of bonds 
for building a city hall, engine bouse 
and prison. This was followed by a reso- 
lution of the same purport as the one 
passed Nov. 2t3, with a single change. 
The new resolution provided for the 
issuance of bonds in denominations of 
8oU0 in place of f 1000, as named in the 
old. A communication was received 
froii. t'.t Iron Bay company asking that 
grades be established on Fourth street 
east in order that contemplated improve- 
ments might be made. In response to 
this a motion was adopted instructing 
the engineer to recommend grades on al) 
avenues east of Central to and including 
Fourth. 

Thomas Corbett ia now night foreman 
at the Car works. 

A young business man received a let- 
ter from a young lady the other day 
which contained an application for a 
clerkship. This was among other quali 
fications offered "medium height, dark 
eyes, dark hair and a go<jd figure." 

O. H. Nelson, the druggist, returned 
from St. Paul yesterday. 

A. M. Badey has been appointed chief 
engineer at the Car works. 

Mike Murdock, who has been sick 
with pneumonia for about a week, died 
yesterday morning. His funeral took 
place at the Methodist church this morn- 
ing at 10 o'clock. 

L. L. Marble hasabout recovered from 
an attack of the grii). 

The Gorseline-Timms assault case 
came up in the district court yesterday. 
The jury returned a verdict of guilty ae 
charged in the indictment, of assault in 
the second degree. This is the outcome 
of the assault on Frank Timms at the 
Car works last spring. 

The gas producers at the Car works 
are now working nicely, doing all the 
work that is rtquired of them. 

Marquette Journal: Among the old 
employes of the Iron Bay Manufactur- 
ing company who went to Duluth with 
the t^ncern, is James McRae, one of the 
oldest men in time employed and in age. 
Mr. McRae. is one of Marquette's pio- 
neers, a whole-souled, generous man and 
as good a citizen as the city had. 
Numerous are the regrets among hie 
many friends to see him go, and all hope 
that success may attend him. 

Lrindlord Edison, who probably will 
assume charge of the Phillips hotel in 
West Duluth, is the father of Mrs. 
Captain Durage of this city. 

A visible increase in the population of 
the town is shown by the demand for 
houses. Capt. Sharp's dwellings have 
been tilling up at the rate of three or 
four a day for the past week. 

The Ladies Aid society of the Congre- 
gational church, which has not met for 
several weeks on account of sickness 
among its members, will bold a meeting 
the first of the week. Mrs. Stowell has 
promised to give a concert for the bene- 
fit of the society sometime during the 
winter, and the ladies are looking for- 
ward to a musical treat. 

E. E. Burlej returned yesterday from 
his visit to Taylors Falls. 

AsMtM and LiabilitieH. 

The following schedule of assets and 
liabilities in the estate of Meagher & 
Kennedy of West Duluth, insolvents, 
was filed this morning: 

ASSETS. 

f4.iaT 48 

279 82 



A TEST 



QUESTION. 

The Oovern- 



Can a Grocery Sell Bitters? 
uient. SayH Not. 
Milwaukee, Jan. 24.— John Maus- 
baum, county judge of Forest county, is 
being tried before Commissioner Ryan, 
charged with violating the internal rev- 
enue laws by selling intoxicating liquors 
without having paid his special tax. It 
was shown by testimony that the de- 
fendant is proprietor of a country store 
in Crandon, and that he keeps for sale 
certain bitters and tonics, which 
is claimed to be aa evasion of law. The 
attorney for the defense moved for dis- 
missal of the prisoner, because the 
proof offered by the government had 
not shown any violation of the revenue 
laws, which motion was denied in order 
to have the court decide the questions 
involved. 



A STABLE 

A <Jay 



TO A BALLROOM. 



Pacitic. it 
ing the 
Seattle o 
railroad. 



Party at Commodore Weld's Coun- 
try Seat at Ilrookline. 

Boston, Jan. 24.- The large stable 
which ex-Commodore William F. Weld 
has just built on his estate in Brookline 
was "dedicated"' last night in grand 
style by a grand ball in which Mr. 
Weld's friends to the number of several 
hundred participated. 

The stable is a structure 160x90 feet 
Ie dimensions. It is of Scotch brick 
with dark red granite trimmings. The 
large open room on the ground 
floor, about 100x40 feet, was used as the 
ballroom. This large room, heated by 
steam and lighted by electricity, made 
one of tiie jolliest ballrooms possible. 
The guests came by carriage and the 
park adjacent was of nafaae^iy wrwmartafi I hrunrlinn 
into an extemporaneous stable for the 
hundreds of horses and carriages whose 
owners were inside enjoying the festivi- 
ties. It was a clear starlight night not 
cooler than many nights in the early 
summer. 

The Gold lirick Trirk. 

Lima, Ohio, Jan. 24.— Frank Clark 
.\dams, living near Covington, Ohio, 
bought a gold brick from a man who 
gave the name of David Watson, and 
who claimed to be a wealthy gold mine 
owner of Arizona, who had returned to 
Ohio in company with his partner, an 
Indian, for the purpose of finding Mr. 
Clark Adams, who had befriended him 
when he was pcwr. Adams did not re- 
member having helped Mr. Watson, but 
when the Indian partner became tired 
of looking for his partner's benefactor 
and demanded money for his share of 
the gold brick, they had brought with 
them. Mr. Adams, after submitting the 
brick to test by an United States assay- 
ist whose name was found on the hotel 
register, advanced $.").'J00 which was 
promptly paid to the Indian, and Wat- 
son, the Indian and the assayist all left. 
The gold brick did not stand the second 
test. 

Iiuniorality In a Penitentiary. 

St. Louis. Mo., Jan. 24.— Mrs. Clara 
Hoffman, state president of the Womens 
Christian Temperance union, has been 
investigating the state penitentiary at 
Jefferson City, and tells a somewhat 
startling story as to the result of her in- 
•luiries. She claims that the white and 
black women are huddled together like 
cattle, ana that the profanity of some o' 
the female prisoners is something awful 
to hear. She also alleges that women 
are whipped for violating rules, and ad- 
duces proofs of immorality at the insti 
tution. 



Morcbimdlse stock 

Ai-oouuts receivable and cash 



Total «6.m30 

LIABILITIES. 

.1. W. Ulaben & Co . St. Paul »1,081 18 

Tarl>ox. .Schliek & Co., St . Paul 485 15 

(;. Golziau i Co.. St. Paul 1,000 88 

MjKllibcr ACo.. St. Paul fiCS U4 

H.C. HuriiuuK & Co., St. Paul 5W0 26 

Krisk, I'uriier & Co., St. Paul 379 00 

0(Kjdyoar Uul>l>er Co., St. Paul 137 10 

S. G. Sihwab\ Co.. .^t. Paul 24 CO 

Si. Paul KiiiUiUK company 193 60 

I'littcr^-on & Di< kcuson, Minneapolis 3(i() 75 

.1. S. Todd, Minneapolis 2186 

Williamson Ai Meiidenhull, Duluth 3( 10 

M.S. Harrows i: Co , Duluth 31 25 

.lames K. Steele, Duluth 70 00 

SiimlicT Hocouuts, Duluth 10 60 

Hoyt ,!( McMinn, West Duluth 16 00 

.\. C. ttsbonie. West Duluih 4 00 



Itit New Name. 

CLKVKL.AND, Ohio, Jan. 24. — The ladies 
who are meeting here for the purpose of 
organizing a National Temperance so 
ciety. adopted another name this morn 
ing. First name agreed upon was Ameri- 
can Womans Christian Temperance 
league. Yesterday afternoon the title 
was changed to National Crusaders. 
This morning another change was made 
and the organization will be known as 
the Non Partisan Womans Christian 
Temperance union. 

Short and Will Settle. 
St. Joskph, Mo., Jan. 24. — The county 
court has finished its work on the ac- 
counts of ex-Collector Tandy H. Trice, 
for the last four years of his adminis- 
tration of his office, and have found him 
to be short $17,000. Mr. Trice has made 
the statement that if the court found 
him short he would settle, and it is now 
presumed that he will. 



THE PACIFIC'S ADVANCE. 



Northern Pacific Build From 
Seattle to the Cana- 
dian Line. 



The Road Shows the Vigor of 

Its New Policy in the 

Move. 



TACt)M;i, Wash., Jan. 24. — Information 
has been received from New York that a 
meeting of the executive committee of 
the boari of directors of the Northern 
was decided to construct dur- 
present year, a railroad from 
a jKjint on the Puget Sound 
recently acquired by the 
Northern Pacific, in a northerly direc 
tion to th e international boundary line, 
with branches to Bellingham bay and 
Ship Haibor. 

Orders were given to have this line 
located immediately, so as to allow the 
boginnini; of construction with the open- 
ing of sp ring. The distance from Seattle 
to the nternational boundary is 100 
miles; bat the proposed road, with the 
to Bellingham Bay and Ship 
Harbor, nill probably not be less than 
200 miles. It will put the Northern Paciric 
in rail connection with all the towns 
on the sliore of the sound, so that it will 
be in the field ahead of any otlier trans- 
continen'al line that may go to the 
sound at any point north of Tacoma and 
ready to xjmpote from the start. The 
new line will ako secure much business 
from a rapidly developing country that 
is now or ly accessible by water. 

H. S. Huron, principal assistant en- 
gineer of the Northern Pacific, went to 
Seattle today, accompanied by Super- 
intenden ; Horner, to take the first steps 
towards 1 he construction of the line. 
Mr. Ht ron received telegraphic in- 
structions from Chief En;jineer Ken- 
drick to work immediately. The road 
will prob ibly go northeast of Washing- 
ton lake eaving Seattle a branch. 

This is in direct line with the new 
policy of vigorous work that The Herald 
has several times asserted has lat«ly 
been dec ded on by the comjjany. Now 
we may lx)k for a good deal more vigor- 
ous fight at the eastern end of the line 
and in Minnesota and Dakota than the 
road has, even of late months, ijersued. 

Itoulanci)«t Tactics. 

Pakis, Jan. 24.- Gen. Boulanger has 
sent a telegram to M. Paul Deroulede 
and his colleagueK in the chamber of 
deputies, who led the recent revolt when 
M. JefiFrii attempted to speak, congratu I 
lating th )m upon showing themselves to i 
be real d jfenders of universal suffrage. 
M. Marti neau, a member of the chamber 
of Deputies, who reci-nlly seceded from 
iie BouUngists, on entering a meeting 
oi Boulaiigists held last light, was at 
tncked, kicked, cuffed and spit upon, 
and com|)elled to sign a resignation of 
his seat in tlie chamljer. 



AN ENGIN EER A RRESTED. 

A Railway ICngrlneer Pays $5800 Bail Be- 
cause of Four Death*. 

Chicago, IU., Jan. 24. — Engineer Ma- 
honey, of the train which ran into a 
funeral procession at Roeehdl last night, 
killing four persons, was jailed this 
morning. IVo charges were preferred 
agaio.st him, one that of criminal care 
Ie8s.)e8s, the other for violating city or- 
dinances. On the one he was held in 
.^oOOO, on the other $200. Superintend- 
ent Cuyler of the Northwestern road, 
furnished the security. The case against 
Mahoney was continued until Tuesday. 
The inquest will be held tomorrow morn- 
ing. 

A 

An Atlantic 



FEARFUL TRIP. 



SteauiKhip Kxperiences a 
Tuu^h Trip AcroH8. 

London, Jan. 24.— The British steamer 
Sardinian, Captain Richardson, from 
Portland Jan. 9, arrived at Liverpool 
last night. She reports very heavy 
weather. On Jan. IG an alarm of hre 
was given, caused by the bursting of a 
steam guage. In the meantime the 
smoke funnel was smashed and the tires 
were smothered by water pouring down 
on them. Two men were killed and a 
third was so badly injured that he sub 
sequently died. Three other men were 
badly injured. 

It was impossible to replace 'the fun- 
nel for twenty-four hours and in the 
meantime the steamer drifted, the storm 
at the same time increasing in severeity. 
The three who were killed were buried 
at sea when the storm abated. All the 
Sardinian lifeboats, except one, were 
smashed by the heavy seas. 



THE FEELING 
The Little 



IN PORTUGAL. 



to 



Nation ShowH an Intention 
Stick for Her Ki;;ht!.. 

Lisbon, Jan. 24. — A large meeting was 
held in the Trinity theater last night to 
start a fund for the national defense" 
The Duke of Pomares preside(i. A com 
mittee of 120, consisting of leading citi 
zens and naval and military oflBoers, 
was appointed to solicit subscriptions to 
the fund. 

A number of 6|)eecl es were miule in 
which England was bitterly assailed for 
the course she has followed in the dis 
pute with Portugal and the French and 
Spanish lauded for their sympathy with 
the Portuguese. A number of sub- 
scriptions were made to the fund by 
persons present at the meeting. 

The Portug^ene Muddle. 

Lisbon, Jan. 24.— Three thousand 
Portuguese citizens have left their cards 
at the French and Spanish legations in 
this city to show their appreciation of 
the sympathy with Portugal shown by 
the French and Spanish in the .\nglo- 
Portuguese dispute. 

Keduction WorkH Keduce<l. 

DF.ADwot)D, S. D., Jan. 24. -The hoist- 
ing works belonging to the Iron Hill 
Mining company, in Carbonate, were 
burned. The tire is Bujtixwed to have 
originated from the explosion of a lamp, 
as there was no one afa^mt at the time. 
Loss, §20,000; insurance, 875(X). 



To the Pultlic. 

Notice is hereby given that Frank A. 
Taylor is not in our employ, and we are 
not responsible for any representations 
made by him. 

Thk Duluth Music Co., 
Successors to W. J. Dver A- Bro. 



C. H. GRAVES & CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1869. 



REAL 



ESTATE. 

Acres, 



Business and Dock 



We have a large list of choice Residence Lots, 
Property, of which we have exclusive control. 

-:- LOANS. -:- 

We negotiate loans in any amount on innproved city property, and for par- 
ties wisl^ ing to build, at the lowest current rates of interest. 

INSURANCE. 

Our list of companies comprises some of the oldest and largest in exist- 
ance. V/e give special attention to the careful writing of policies and prompt 
and fair settlement of all losses. 



Total «5,003 34 

Charles W. Hoyt has filed his bond as 
assignee, with M. L. Minn and A. F. 
Swanstrom as sureties. 



MAKING ARRANGEMENTS 



See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. MACFAIIL.ANE & AnSTIN. 



For KnightB of Pythian at Milwaukee 
Next Mumuier. 
Milwaukee, Jan. 24. -Oen. Carnahan, 
grand commander of the Uniformed 
Chapter Knights of Pythias, with his 
staff, met last night with merchants and 
advancement associations to discuss ar- 
rangements for the Knights of Pythias 
grand conclave to be held in this city 
next July. It was shpwn that.TOOO tents 
would be required, also suitable grounds. 
When a member of the staff broached 
the subject of a rate of one cent a mile 
on the railroads, there was a i>eculiar 
expression noticeable on the face of 
every Milwaukee man present who had 
remembered the agitation of low rates 
for the Grand Army last summer, (ien. 
Carnahan, however, assured all ttiat 
there would be no (controversy with the 
railroads over the question of rates, 
although an effort would be made to 
secure as low a rate as possible to Mil 

waukee. 

.Senator Klddleherjjer Die*. 
Win(hF.stek, Va., Jan. 24.- Ex-Sena- 
tor Riddleberger died at 2:.S0 o'clock this 
morning. 



FRAUD F REDE RICKSEN. 

Reported That a Milwaultee Man Received 
a Letter l''roui Hlui. 

Chicago, Jan. 24.— The report that a 
Milwaukee man ftas received a letter 
postmarked Chicago from Fredericksen, 
the absconding land sharp has had the 
effect of sending several members of the 
detective department on a still hunt 
since Sunday last. 

No trace of the lum-h wanted individ- 
ual, however, can be found :ind it is be- 
lieved that the letter must have been 
enclosed to someone in thid city to be 
mailed. Fredericksen is under indict- 
ment in C<x)k county, but the authori 
ties have made little efTurt, despite the 
magnitude of his frauds, to locate him. 

A Billiard Match. 
Chicaoo, Jan. 24. -A billiard match 
lietween Frank Maggloli and William 
Hatley attracted a crowd last night. 
It was a ctmtest of 500 at the 14-inch 
balk lino for $200 a side, and Schaeffwr- 
Foley medal, which is subject to chal- 
lenge for all billiard players except SIok 
wm and Schaeffer. Maggioli, who ob- 
tained the medal through a forfeit, from 
Frank Ives, will retain it, as he defeated 
Hattiey by a score of 500 to 1127. 

South Daliota Editont t>r|;ani/.o. 

Mitchell, S. D., Jan. 24. -A largely- 
attended meeting of editors was held 
here tmlay for the purpose of forming a 
state association, and alen of organiiiing 
a mutual newspaper union for the pub- 
lication of auxilary sheets. 



ADVANCE IN STEEL RAILS. 



J. A. Boggs offers profitable invetjt- 
ments in Superior. This property will 
double in six months. 



Nellie Id Chicago. 

CuicAOo, Jan. 24.— Mi.'^s Nellie Biv, on 
her tour around the world, reaihed this 
city at 8 o'clock this u^orningon a special 
train from KaDs,as City and left at 10:30 
o'clock on the regular Pennsylvania 
train for New York. She should arrive 
' there about 4 p. m. tomorrow. 



Higher Price ot Crude Materlali*; The Ex- 
planation Given. 

New Yokk, Jan. 24.— The one new 
feature in the iron and steel trades the 
last few days is an advance of 81 per ton 
in the prices of steel rails. Agents of all 
the Eastern mills are now quoting .S3G 
free on board at works as bottom figures, 
and it is intimated that a further ad- 
vance of 81 will shortly be made. 

The higher price is justified by the 
cost of crude materials and the extent to 
which future production is already sold 
ahead. There has -been sold up to the 
1st itist. f<jr 1890 delivery a total of 746,- 
805 tons by the associated manufac- 
turers. No rails to speak of have been 
carried over from last year, and 
the general jjosition would tlius 
appear to be better at the present time 
than for many years. The cost of crude 
materials \>i high and considered likely 
to remain so indefinitely, whilst a large 
proy)ortion jf the contracts in hand for 
rails were taken at prices much lower 
than those now quoted. Few new orders 
have come upon the market the last 
week, but buyers who had options at 
SVi have manifested more disposition to 
close, and it is expected that about 30,- 
OCK) tuns will shortly be taken. 

Wlnti lit a Mocker, 

IBostoii Courier.] 

Win<> Is a imx'kor 

Ami stronjf drink l8 miflQg. 
Bui who cares for tliat 

W imn tils ttilrst he's a8su»gingV 
•Tin only uoxt diiy. 

When his temples arc acliing. 
He thinks what a fDol 

0| himself bo's been making, 



An Old Kuipluye Steals. 

Chicago, Jan. 24.— Oscar E. Park^ 
cashier at Marshall, Field & Co.'s retail 
Bt<:)re, this city, has been arrested, 
charged with embezzlement. The 
amount of his shortage so far discovered 
is over 81C(X), and is expected to reach a 
much larger figure. Park has been in 
the employ of the firm seventeen years. 

Chicago's Dally Death Kate. 

Chicago, Jan. 24.— Ninety-six death 
certificates were returned to the health 
office yesterday, making a total for the 
five days of the week of 591. Nine of 
the ninety-six were caused by pneumo- 
nia, five by bronchitis, six by diphtheria, 
five by phthisis pulmcnalis and nine by 
grii> itself. 

A French Duel. 

P.VBI.S, Jan. 24. — Edouard Rothschild, 
the son of Baron Alphonse liothschild, 
became involved in a dispute with 
Marquis DeGouy. A challenge was sent 
and accepted, and today a duel was 
fought. The marquis was wounded. 

Spurgeon Worse. 

London, Jan. 24. — Advices from Men- 
tone say there has been further develop- 
ment of gout in the case of Spurgeon, 
and that he is now unable to leave that 
place. 

DISTRICT court. 



ROOMS 2, 3 AND 4, BOARD OF TRADE BL"G, DULUTH. MINN. 

-^ CHEAP - ACRES -i- 



NEXT TO LAND THAT WILL BE 



Platted This Spring. 



The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptlv 



Before Judge Stearns the criminal 
case of The State vs. Louis Murray in- 
dicted for allowing gambling tables oc- 
cupied nearly all the morning. 

The civil case of the Lamson Consoli- 
dated Store Service company vs. Silber- 
stein & Bondy was ordered set for trial 
in vacation. The damage suit of Thomas 
Timlin vs. Duluth then came up, a large 
num'oer of witnesses on both sides be 
ing in attendance, 

Before Judge Ensign. Windsor 
Foundry Company vs. Herman Berg, 
oceui)ied all the morning, and it was 
ordered that briefs should be submitted. 
Gridley & Mishler vs. Wallace Warner is 
on calf for this aftern<x)n. 

The jury in the Louis Murray case 
came into court at a little past 3 o'clock 
this aftermxm with a verdict of guilty. 

A Mutual Kccognition, 
A whisky iirisoner named William 
Riittle, who was arrested by Deputy 
Marshal Beaulieu, was lodged in the 
county jail last night and was taken to 
St. Paul this morning. After the 
prisoner had been received he said to 
the turnkey; "I know that man (Sheriff 
Shari'v). I saw him many vears ago." 
An investigation showed that the 
prisoner's father had been incarcerated 
iu 1877 on the charge of murder, and 
Paul Sbarvy was deputy at the time. 
The Imw was' a witness and remember«d 
Paul for the intervening period of 
thirteen years. 

* Indian river oranges at Victor Huot's. 



WILLIAMI C. SIIRG[IIT. 

REAL ESTATE. 

Special Bargains I Snaps. 

: 0(D Acres in 4-50-14, 25 per cent below the 
market. 
200 Acres in 47- 1 6 at $5 per acre. 

Lands in 28-50- 1 5 at a great bargain. 
Several pieces of acreage on the hill below 
th(5 market. ____________ 

2 Lots on Superior Street, Endion. 

63 Lots adjoining Lonaon, cheap. 

A few of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale en easy terms. 

/» few desirable lots in Endion for sale without cash pay- 
ment, if improved. 

J. M. ROOT & CO., 

Room 9, Metropolitan Blo«k. 



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DiriilTTH I.V'ENING HEILAXD: JAITCTABY 24, 1890. 



EVEXINa HERALD. 



ELIOT LORD, Publl*her. 



PRICE. THREE CENTS— Subscription Rates: 

0aily, by maU, per year $7.00 

Daily, by mall, per three moaths 2.0O 

Dally, by mail, per uue month 76 

IS THB CITY. 

Dally, by carrier, per week 18 



Bntered at the poetoffiee at Duluth, Mlna., as 
MCoad-cluM mall matter. 



EV~The Washington office of The Herald Is 
at 1124 New York avenue, N. W., where the 
paper is kept on flle and where The Herald 
correspondent will welcome visitors from the 
Northwest. 



Call for Kepnlilican Cauciu. 

All legully nuaUfl -d voters who intend to 
vote for the repuhliian candidates tor the 
various othees to In.' Ulled in the city of Duluth 
ou February 4. 1»<0, at the regular city elec- 
tion, are hereby nutitied that caucuses wiL be 
held between the hours of 5 and * p. m., on 
January 'H, IMM-i. for the purpiHse of electing 
delejpiles lo the city repubttcaii convention. 

The places for holding caucuses and the 
numlier of delegates lo wuich each precinct is 
entitled have been estabUshe"! as follow : 

first ward— Asa Dailey's lumber office, 433 
Lake avenue south. 

Second want— James 3IcBeth's store. East 
SuiH-Tior street. 

Third wanJ. I'irst Precinct— Heady building, 
136 Kast First street. 
Sevond precinct— 331 East Superior street. 
Third precinct— East End livery barn. 
Fourth ward. First precinct— 113 West First 
street. 
Sec-oud precinct— 319 West Superior street. 
Third precinct— 701 West Superior street. 
Filth ward. First precinct— ItiUi West Su- 
perior street. 
Second precinct— «i36 Garfield avenue. 
Third precinct- lici.' West Michigan street. 
Sixth ward— :i»l West Michigan street. 
The basis of n.'preseutatiou has been tl.Ted at 
one delegate to each luu votes or maj -r frac- 
tion ther\.<of cast ti'r the republican candidate 
at the l.-ist p! 1 - election, and one dele- 

gate at large 'Pecinct. 

Each ware ..- .1 to the following repre- 
sentation: First ward. 4 delegates; Second 
Third ward. First precinct. 
1 precinct. 3 delegates : Third 
• s; Fourth ward. First pre- 
Secoud preciiiL-t. 4 delegates ; 
delegates; F'ltth ward. First 



which operatea the Great Norrie, the 
East Norrie and Pabst mines. A cash 
dividend of 86.50 per share of 825 has 
just been made. The capital stock of 
the company is $2,000,000. divided into 
80,000 shares, consequently a dividend of 
86.50 per share means the distribution of 
$520,000 among the stockholders. Jan- 
uary stock lists give the market value of 
the stock at i6o per share, but it is 
now nearer $75. Some stockholders will 
receive a fortune from this one dividend. 
One man bought 7000 shares for $60,000, 
and now he will receive 845,500 in one 
lump 88 his share of a single year's 
profits. In his annual report President 
Curn?"l|B\8 that there were shipped from 
the unil?? of the company, in 1889, 771,- 
27'J tons, of which the Xorrie contributed 
550,846 tons. This mine alone, he says, 
is capable of producing fully 700,000 tons 
the coming season. The East Xorrie 
mine proiluced 117,443 tons during 1881), 
and can produce during the coming 
season fully 175,000 tons. 



LITTLE CHUNKa OF NEWS. 

An Eastern railway official: New 
orders, announcements, passes, etc. to be 
good on this road will be issued by the 
Great Northern railway. 

Poatoffice News Agent Henr\- Gruesen: 
I don't keep that filthy paper, the St. 
Paul Sun. But you'd be surprised to 
see who want it, the other day a woman 
who trie* to go in the way-up society 
came in and asked for it. I told her I 
didn't run that kind of a place and didn't 
keep that sort of nasty papers 'round. 
She went off mad. 

Indian .\gent M. W. Leahy in a note 
to the editor: There is no doubt as to 
the destitute condition of the Court 
Oreilles Indians. I have been there and 
know. The Indian office is takintr 
measures to afford them relief iit an 
early day. ^o logging is being done on 
any of the reservations of this agency. 
The Indian office concluded to allow no 
logging of Indian pine the present win- 
ter in the La Point agency. 

WITH STATE PAPERS. 



NOTED PEOPLE. 



A PRISONER'S REFLECTIONS. 



ward, 3 delegates 

4d. - 

pn 

ClUi . . ,^, . 

Third prevjuci 



precinct. 3 delegates ; Second precinct. 4 deie- 

rates. Thin" 
delegates. 



fates. Third precinct, 3 delegates; Sixth ward, 
d 



J.AJfKS DlSGWALL, 

John H. LAV.A.yLT:, 

P. S. A.NSKliJJ, 
CUAKi.ES UOCAS, 

H. S. LoKO. 

S. M. I^K^iTKK, 

City Hepublican Com. 



Call for City Republican Convention. 

All duly elected delegates to the city repub- 
lican couventiou will meet in the council room 
at the city ha I, Duluth. MinnestJta, on Jan, :5. 
'■■' ■' " ■ i.ixte of placing in 

lutes for the var- 
~; ..wir; two aldermen. 
First ward; one aidermau. Second ward ; one 
alderman. Third wanl; one alderman. Fourth 
ward: one alderman. Filth ward: one alder- 
man, SLzib ward. 

M. O. Hall. Chairtnan Com, 



A GRAVE MISTAKE. 

In advance of the action of the repub- 
lican party convention, and before it is 
possible to determine whether such 
actioa will be acceptable to all good 
citizens, whatever their individual pref- 
erences may be. Alderman Davis, as we 
are informed, has accepted an independ- 
ent nomination, and "will probably not 
go into the republican convention." Mr. 
Davis ia, of course, at liberty to do as he 
chooses, but we r^ard his deter- 
mination as a grave mistake 
at this juncture. The republicans 
of this city can scarcely be 
expected to put in nomination 
a man who does not count himself 
among them, who declines to take any 
part in their deliberations, who distrusts 
the wisdom of their decision before he 
hears it and puts his self-assertion in 
place of the concord of opinion of a rep 
resentative convention. The Herald has 
always been ready to support the asser- 
tion of just and timely and unselfish 
and honorable independence, but it has 
never seen cause for casting a slight on 
the judgment of a party before it is 
given, and that party must be uncom- 
monly low-spirited which accepts the 
slight and honors the giver. 

In -so viewing the case, we do not re- 
flect at all upon the independent candi 
date's integrity, or his entire personal 
freedom to do as he chooses in regard to 
acting with the republican party. He is 
not restrained by any considerations 
except discretion and regard for the 
probable advantage of the city from en- 
tering the field when and how he likes, 
and accepting any nominations which 
he can get. If he thinks the city as a 
whole is likely to benefit from the con- 
test of several candidates, and the con- 
Beqent distraction and division of votes, 
he is about to make his run for the 
benefit of the city in his own mind, 
whatever the actual issue and effect 
may be. We do not presume to read 
his conscience, nor to determine how far 
even a good man may be influenced by 
personal ambition, unreasonable preju- 
dices or unfounded fears that the repub- 
lican party has lost its head, and that 
the city will be well cared for in no other 
hands than his. 

We are aware that The Herald makes 
theee remarks at the risk of being 
branded as one of the "gang," and that 
the coming municipal campaign is 
gravely declared to be "a contest of the 
people against the gang." This careful 
separation of the sheep from the goats 
in Duluth would mark that all not 
ranged behind Alderman Davis in his 
preseut course must be content to be 
counted among the goats. The Herald 
is for one, and fully believes that the 
"gang" it belongs to is likely to be 
counted as the people when the returns 
are in. Vituperation is senseless. The 
people of this city see, hear, think and 
judge for themselves. We are willing 
to abide their verdict. 



"Well. It seems nice to be free agalB, after 
nearly eight mouths' confluement in that 
Jail," said John Simmons yesterday a short 
time after the Jury announced he was not 
guilty. "That's the only Jail I ever was con- 
fined in and I'm not much of an authority; I 
don't care to have a second dose, but I believe 
there never was a kinder-hearted man than 
Head Jailer Kiehard Long, or 'Uncle Dick,' as 
we call him. It's terribly monotonous In there: 
a distant S'Und of the outside world comes in 
to you through the barred windows, but all 
day long the priitcipal sound is Uie clangor 
which must come from a lot of prisoners coii- 
Qncxi in a steel cage. 

* « « 
"I used to take a mile walk before eavli meal 

Just for exercise, you know. That statement 
seems queer, does it? Well, 300 times the 
length of the cage corridor, forward and back 
Is liti feet over a mile, so I used to walk up 
anddown Just ;jOU times for an appetizer, 1 
lost exactly twelve |>ounds while I was locked 
up. Time hung very heavy on our hands, and 
a new prisoner was quite a welcome i«mer. 
We had what wo called a 'kang.iroo court" 
with Judge, sheriff, attorneys, witnesses, etc., 
and we tried every new comer, and gave vari- 
ous sentences or fines. 

♦ * * 

"Vou want to know about that Jall-brcaking 
attempt, do you'/ Well, that was a big Job. 
With the rude tools the prisoners made they 
bored considerably over 36U holes, oran equiva- 
lent of. one hole oB inches long through solid 
steel, and it took lots of patience and hard 
work. I'm going Into the woods as soon as I 
can get work, I've got to wire my mother 
right off that I'm free again; she's very sick 
and the news will bring hor up," 



SOMETIME. 



LKugeue Field.] 
Last night, my darling, as you slept, 

I thought I neard you sigh. 
And to > our little crib 1 crept 

Aud watched a ^pace thereby: 
Then, bending down, I kissed your brow— 

For, oh, I love you so— 
You are too young to know it now. 

But sometime >ou shall know. 

Sometime, when, in a darkened place 

Where others come to weep. 
Your eyes shall see a weary face 

Calm in eternal sleep. 
The >peechie6s lips, the wrinkled brow. 

The patient siuile may show— 
You are too young to know it now. 

But sometiuie you shall know. 

Look backward, then, into the years. 

And see me h«rf tonight- 
See, O. my darling! how my tears 

Are falling as 1 write: 
AntI feel once more unon your brow 

The kiss of long ago— 
You are too young to know It now. 

But sometime you shall know. 

What Will be Guarded Agalnnt. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

From The Herald I learn that the 
architects are busy preparing plans for 
the new high school building to be built 
on sanitary plans. This means many 
things. .\t a meeting of the Ramsey 
County Medical 60t;iety the following re- 
port was made: ".\t our iit. Paul high 
school, in the five studies of an ordinary 
scholar, we find there are about 300 
steps to be climbed daily. This gives an 
idea of the physical requirements." Now 
our new buildingought to be constructed 
so that no such physical exertions are 
required. There can be no doubt that 
the course of our high schools taxes the 
mental powers severely enough. Add 
to this repeated physical strain and the 
system breaks down. Climbing stairs 
is a physical strain. Let the new 
building in our city furnish not only 
light and air, but also do away with the 
necessity of too much stair climbing. 

Physician. 



Madelia Times: Farmers in the 
vicinity of St. James are talking strongly 
of putting up a farmers' warehouse no.vt 
season. They have seen the good effect 
of the one here in keeping up the price 
of grain. It has been conducted by 
honest and capable men so as to realize 
all that can be gotten out of those farm 
products. The warehouse here has 
taken in a large quantity. Seeing this, 
the St. James farmers are greatly en- 
couraged to try the plan. too. 

Hallock Enterprise: I'or many years 
the Farmers alliance movement has 
been gaining ground, and the past few 
months has seen a great many alliances 
organized throughout the Red River 
valley. The farmers of Kittson oouc^ty 
are getting their eyes opened and are 
pushing the organization of alliances. 
This is certainly their only means of pro 
tection against the w^heat rings, and the 
sooner the state alliance can say to the 
subordinates "We have fought and con- 
quered," just B^^ soon will the farmers re- 
ceive protection, and not until then. 
What do the millers, grain and ware- 
house commissioners care for the 
farmers? A concerted action on the 
part of the farmers of the Red River 
valley to organize as against this gang 
will prove beneficial, 

St. Paul Dispatch: It is given out 
that the Farmers alliance will not bring 
out a candidate for governor this year. 
On behalf of all aspiring and worthy 
members of the alliance the wisdom of 
this decision deserves to be highly com- 
mended. There are a few gentlemen 
who mix hayseed in their hair around 
convention times to whom the protec- 
tion which this assurance affords should 
not be extended. 

St. Cloud Times: It is possible that 
Senator Washburn, with the aid of Win- 
dom, may secure more offices for his 
friends than Senator Davis, This is the 
ambition of a politician. But there is 
one thing that Washburn cannot and 
never will do, and that is to deliver such 
a speech as the one recently made by 
Senator Davis, on the improvement of 
waterways. 



Prince Albert Victor met with a cor- 
dial reception at Lucknow. Upon his 
arrival he was presented with an ad- 
dress, and afterwards opened a n«w hos- 
pital. 

The Empress Augusta was extremely 
fond of hand-organ music, and not only 
frequently encouraged organ-grinders to 
play l^fore the palace, but also had sev- 
eral broken down street musicians on 
her pension list. 

Emin Pasha is suffering from an ab- 
scess of the exterior of the skull which 
has caused partial paralysis of the tongue. 
He sees no Eurojiean except a German 
diK'tor. 

Miss Mary Anderson is assuredly en- 
gaged to be married. Mr. and Mrs. De 
Navarro of New York cabled to Paris 
congratulations on their son's engage- 
ment to Miss Anderson, w.io is at San 
Re mo. 

Hon. C. B. Webster, M. D.. of Bos 
cawen, N. H., ex-United States consul to 
Sheffield, England, has gone to Wash- 
ington to pass the remainder of the 
season. 

Miss .\gnes Huntington was a second 
triumph in London on Saturday evening 
in the leading role of the new comic 
opera "Marjorie." 

Mr. Appleton Longfellow, son of the 
poet, is at Nice as the guest of James 
Grordon Bennett. 



We Have Cloud Caite. 

Marquette Journal: Sometime ago 
Duluth issued bonds to the amount of 
$100,000, and sold the lot to Hayes Jk 
Son. They have not yet put up for the 
bonds, which were issued to meet obli- 
gations about to mature. The city has 
been embarrassed by their want of faith 
and talks of bringing suit for damages 
against the brokers who have trifled 
with its credit. It ought to have a first 
rate case, for in addition to the annoy- 
ance and loss, the action of the brokers 
has reflected on the value of Duluth 
bonds. 



POLLING PLACES. 

BoundurieH of Wards anil I'reciactM and 
Where to Register. 

Below are given the places of registra- 
tion for the municipal election that is to 
take place on Feb. 4 next. 
First ward— .\sa Dailey's lumber office. 
Second ward— McBeth's grocery store. East 

Superior street. 
Third ward, first precinct— All territory east of 
La vc avenue to Third avenue east. Poll- 
ing place. No, VX East First si reeL 
Second precinct— All territory batween Third 
avenue east and Sixth avenue east. Poll- 
ing place. ya") East ^up«'^i()rstrv>et, 
Third pnH-iuct -All territory lietween Sixth 
avenue east and Tenth av>-nuu east. Poll- 
ing place, corner of SuiKirlor street 
and Washington avenue. 
Fourth ward, first precinct -AH icr-ltory be 
tween I.,ake avenue and Third avenue west 
north of the First ward limits. Polling 
place, Howard building, 113 West First 
street. 
Second pi-eclnct- All territory between 
Third avenue we<t aud Sixth avenue west. 
Polling pliice,419 West Superior street. 
Third precinct— All territory between Sixth 
avenue west and Twelfth avenue west 
Polling place. '.Ol West Superior street. 
Fifth ward, first precinct— All that part of 
Fifth ward north of Northern Pacific rail- 
road yards and east of Uarfleld avenue. 
Polling place, Ititti West Su|>erlor street. 
Second prei'in<'t— All that oart of Klces 
Point south of Northern Pacific railroa<l 
yards. Polling place. (SJ6 Garfield avenue. 
Third precinct— All that part of the ward 
west of Garfield and Piedmont avenues 
and north <>f the Northern Pacific railroad 
yards. Polling place, 1923 West Michigan 
stJeet. 
Sixth ward— Polling place. No. 2231 West 
Michigan street. 



Peculiar 

Peculiar In combination, proportion, mnd 
preparation of ingredients. Hood's 8arsap»- 
rllla possesses the curative valae of the beat 
known remc- U^^ JJ^ cilea of the 
vegetable nOOa Sktagdom. 
Peculiar In its strength and economy, Hood's 
SarsapariUa Is the only medicine of which can 
truly be said, " One Hundred Doses One Dot 
lar." Peculiar in its medicinal merits, Hood's 
SarsapariUa accomplishes cures hitherto un- 

woXSarsaparillat?Je'u 

the title of "The greatest blood piulfierever 
discovered." Peculiar In its "good name 
at home,"— there is more of Hood's Sarsa- 
Darilla sold in Lowell than of all other 
blood purifiers. Peculiar in Its phenomenal 
record «>* »^-»,,|J _ „8alesabroad 
no other r^eCU I lar preparation 
ever attained so rapidly nor held so 
steadfastly the confidence of all classes 
ol people. Peculiar In the brain-work which 
It represents. Hood's SarsapariUa com- 
bines all the knowledge which modem 
research— |**5^lf '" medical 
science h-as lO I ISCI I developed, 
with many years practical experience In 
preparing medicines. Be sure to get only 

Hood's SarsapariUa 

Sold by all druggists. )$1 ; six f or P3. Prepared only 
by C. I. HOOD & CO., Apothecaries, LoweU, Mass. 

lOO Doses One Dollar 



RHYME OF THE GOOSE. 



An Old Lady, a Stranger and a 

Goose Constitute the 

Subject of a 



REAL ESTATE. 



SPECIAL BAHGAINS. 



I 60 Acres, section 2-48- 



320 
80 " 
160 " 

70 " 
80 " 
80 " 

Lot 2, block 
$325. 
2 Lots, block 5, West End, SI 050. 

We have exclusive sale of this prop- 
erty. 



18-60- 
I 2-50. 
20-50- 
26-50- 
28-50- 
27-50- 



16. 
15. 
16. 
15. 
15. 
15. 
15. 



30, Dodge's addition, 



Little Story, Which, if you Have 

the Leisure, You Might 

Read. 









Whether True or False We Cannot Say; At any 

Rate, Some Useful Lessons May be 

Qathered Therefrom. 



' I knew an old wife, lean and poor. 

Her rags scarce held together; 
There strode a stranger to the door. 
Aud It was windy weather. 

He held a goose upon his arm. 
He ultor'd rhyme and reason: 

'Here, take the goose and keep you 
It is a stormy season.' 



warm; 



LAZIER BROS., 

26 Exchange BIdg. 



QUIPS ON DULUTH. 

LNew York World.l 
There was a young man of Duluth, 
Who tried to get drunk on rermoiith: 

His success was quite marked. 

For he savagely barketl. 
And he had lo be muzzled, forsooth. 

Judge: Miss DuLuth, on deck of 
steamer otf for Paris to study voice cul- 
ture — tiood-bye, mamma. 

Mrs. DuLuth— Good-bye, dear; don't 
neglect the high notes! 

Mr. DuLuth, who has worked hard 
tinancially to arrange for the trip I 
shan't be allowed to. 



Indian river oranges at Victor Huot's. 

Dancing and Deportment. 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. 11.3 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 

Around tlie World. 

There was a time when a man who had 
circled the globe was a nine day's won- 
der, and if dime museum managers had 
existed then, the traveled individual 
would have been exhibited as a "freak." 
Now .>^uch a voyage is so common that 
we liave ceased to regard the world's cir- 
cumference of 25,000 miles as anything 
large. But distance can be measured in 
another way— by the difficulty and ex- 
pense of overcoming it. The Burlington 
system of railroads has 7000 miles of 
track. Do you realize what a lot of rails 
it would take to string out 14,000 miles 
in a single line? How much money they 
would cost? How many great cities anil 
thriving towns you would pass in travel- 
ing that distance? Buy a ticket over 
the Hnest railrod in the West, and in- 
vestiga'«. For information more in de- 
tail, call on any of the Burlington agents, 
or those of connecting hues, or write to 
W. J. C. Kenyon, (Jen. Pass. Agent C., 
B. & N. R. R, St. Paul, Minn. 



B 





FOR SALE: 

50-H"ln Jcreage, - 
M-15--ln taie, - 
Superior Street 
Dock Propertf, - 



1. 
1. 



BITS OF STATE NEWS- 



Tbe Weather Uuiletin. 

Meteorological report received at 
Klnn., 8 a. m. .Ian 24. 1890. 

PIECES. Bar Iher. Wimi «•. 



Dulutb 



Duluth .30.40 

Pt Arthur.. 30.36 
Winnipeg ..,29.»t 
St. Vincent 29.98 
Q'Appelle. I... 
Aselnib'ne .29. 

Helena I29.T0 

Huron.Dak. .'>M« 
St. Paul .... :*j.42 
La Crosse... IH) 5e 
Bismarck.. 29. 9() 
Moorhead .. :Ju.08 



-10 
-10 
- 4 



^ 

36 

6 

-12 

-14 
•> 





8W 

S 

SB 

8' 

8W 

SW 

SB 

E 

S 

SB 



. 



VVdlli^ , 



Cloudv 
Cloudless 
Cloudy 
Cloudy 



Cloudless 

Cloudv 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

P't cloudy 

cloudless 

Cloudy 



1 K . ™" oilumn indicates trace. One (1) 
inch of rain or inelted snow efiuals ten (lOi in- 
ches of snowlall. Minus (-) In temperature 
column i ndlcates t)eIow zero f«. > ai u re 

w. H. Fallon, 

Serireant Signal Corps 



DcLCTH, Jan. ^.— Local forecast for 
twenty-four hours, ending 10 a. vu Jan. 
2>: Warmer weather otidsnoiv. 

WA.sHmGTOJt, Jan. '2i.~Foreca8t for 
twenty-four hours, ending 8 a. m. to- 
ntorrow: For South Dakota : Warmer 
fair, southwesterly tHntU For yort/l 
Dakota : Fair, followed by local snows, 
winds shifting to westerly, wanner. For 
Minnesota: Fair, except light local 
snows in northern portion, 
soutlwt'ly winds. 



warmer, 



The Milwaukee i: St. Paul company is 
testing a new invention, with a view of 
attaching it to all the through jiassenger 
trains between Minneapolis and Chicago. 
It is a boiler-car made of steel, and 
which is to be stationed next to the 
engine when the train is made up. The 
car IS intended for heating and lighting 
the train. 

Commissioner Helgesen has received a 
draft for $227 from the Minneapolis 
board of trade for the North Dakota 
destitute. 

Marshall is having its share of the 
influenza. The public schools have been 
closed. Out of an enrollment of over 
300 more than one-third of the scholars 
and two of the teachers were sick. 

The funeral of Judge Brown of Wil- 
mar was held today, under the auspices 
of the Masonic grand lodge. 

The report of Meat Inspector Davies 
of St. Paul shows that during the year 
57,752 pounds of meat have been con- 
demned. Most of this was parasitic 
pork. The inspector pronounces bologna 
sausages dangerous as a rule as they 
frequently contain scraps of refuse meat. 
A recommendation is made that all 
bread condemned because of lightweight 
should be turned over to the poor de- 
partment. The building of a public 
slaughter house is favored. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate tinishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

Kast End .Skating Rink. 

David N. Morison, champion fast 
skater of Duluth, and W. W. Brown, 
champion fast skater of Wisconsin, will 
skate three races at above rink on the 
following dates for i50 a side and a gold 
medal to be given by the rink, Friday 
evening, Jan. 24th, distance, three miles; 
Tuesday evening, Jan. 28th, distance, 
three miles; aud Thursday evening, Jan. 
30, distance, live miles, the one winning 
best two out of three racee to be declared 
the winner. Judges to be seWted on 
the ice. Walkers military band will be 
in attendance. 



Lots for Sale as 
as $25 each. 



lONA*' 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



SPECIAL LIST 



-OF— 



6 PER CENTI 



We have at command unlimited 
amounts of money to lend promptly 
at 6 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



BARGAINS 



OFFEKKD BY 



C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage on the hill, juct back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half Interest In this forty 
acres can be had for $62,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

040 Acres near Old Superior 150 

I Acres In the heart of the East End, 
on both sidasof Fourth street 30,000 



The best bargain offered now is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which Is safe and 
sure. An Investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing In the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



C. E 



Loans Made on Unimproved Property. 



Time: 
phwat is 
rade of? 
tail uv it. 

Pat Brady 



Important to Voters. 

Mike McManus— Say, Pat, 
this Austhralian system we 
I can't make nayther head nor 



What will Duluth boys do next? Not 
allowed to slide down hill, and now 
arrested for snowballing. Life is indeed 
a burden. 



Nature in Convulsion 

Is terrific. Volcanic eruptions, cyclones, 
earthquakes are awfully and tremend- 
ously picturesijue, but scarcely desirable 
to emulate in action and effect by the 
administration of remedies which pro- 
duce convulsion and agony in the ab- 
noriual portion of the human frame. 
Such IS the effect of the old fashioned 
violent purgatives happily falling more 
and more into disuse, and of which Hos- 
tetter's Stomach Bitters is the whole- 
some, pleasant and far more effe<tive 
Buccedaneum. They weakened the in- 
testines—the Bitters invigorates them. 
1 hey left the bowels inactive, because 
incapacitated by ensuing feebleness. 
1 he Bitters, on the contrary, and be- 
cause It enables, not forces, them to act 
—a vast and fortunate difference— tier 
petuates their activity and regularity 
Ihe liver is Ijenelicially stimulated, as 
the kidneys also are, by this medicine 
which easily conquers, also, malaria, ner- 
vousness and rheumatism. 



, , . Is that so? I thocht ye 

had more intelligence. The Australian 
system is solitary confinement for the 
voter, widout whusky. 



Sideboards. 

Life: Lady (in furniture store l<j new 
clerk) Where are those handsome side- 
boards that you had last week? 

Clerk (embarrassed)— Oh, I— er— I 
shaveil them off day afore yesterday, 
ma am. 



BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTY, 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTGAGES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



Perhaps iron mining doesn't pay, but 
a dividend of over 25 per cent on one 
year's business would seem to prove the 
contrary. One of the largest dividends 
ever paid by an iron mining company 
has been declared by the directors of the 
Metropolitan Iron & Land company. 



Fe<xior V. Luerzer, artist from Mun 
ich, \ lenna, has opened studio in In- 
Talls block, room 13. His pictures are 
on exhibition at LaVaque's, where full 
information can be obtained. Terms for 
painting lessons in oil, water colors, etc., 
one lesson, three hours, seven tv five 
cents; one lesson weekly, :J2 50 ' 
month. 



per 



Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 
the market. W. A. Footk A Co. 



New 



Explained. 

York Sun: "Do you know 

Chauncey Depew?" "Very well indeed." 

Why don't you have a pass on the N. Y 

C.&H.R. R. R?" "Because Chaunctn 

doesn't know me." 



KaMt End 8katinK Rink. 

David N. Morison, champion fast 
skater of Duluth, and W. W. Brown, 
champion fast skater of Wisconsin, will 
skate a race for $,50 a side at the rink to- 
night. Walkers Military band will l)e 
in attendance. 



MM & PIIIIIDLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 

Duluth National Bank Building. 



RICHARDSON, 

326 West Superior Street. 

COFFm & WtRNEIl, 

30 FARGD880N BI^X^K. 



40 Acres, section 30-48-14. 
I 20 Acres, section 34-48- 1 4. 

60 Acres, section 32-48- 1 3. 

40 Acres, section 18-60-14. 
I 20 Acres, section 6-49-16. 

40 Acres, section 2-50- 1 6. 

40 Acres, section 32-48-14. 

40 Acres, section 26-48- 1 6. 

20 Acres, section 28-48-13. 

40 Acres, section 24-50-16. 
1 20 Acres, section 30-50. 1 6. 

All below the market. 



COFFIN & WARNER. 




s 



The Herald bindery has the liest 
facilities in Duluth for making blank 
books. 



Clan Stewart announce that their 
Burns Anniversary Banquet in St. Louis 
hotel on I'riday first, will commenco ati) 
o clock sharj), when supin-rwijl be served 
to l>e foUowetl by the program a.- 
printed. Schillings full orchestra will 
furnish the dance music. Tickets for 
the whole entertainment «2 each, admit- 
ting lady and gentleman, may be had 
from members of the Clan 




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w.c. 




HO., 



REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVH OBNCINB BARaAIMS IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In dlflfei parts of the city and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 

All we ask Is for pi rtlestocxamtneourlist and 

compare tbem rtth other prices before 

buying. Call or write. 

W. O. Sherwood & Co., 

J. D. &r:^"ray; 

REAL ESTATE. 



ROOM "B." 



HUNTER BLOCK. 



i 



B. C. OKIDLBY. J. C. MISHLRR 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 
Real Estate Brokers 

Room SB, Bzohan«ro DuUdlng. 
List your property with, us at what It is worth 
and w« will sell It. We Invite everytwdy to 
call In and see us, and Mllolt oorrcflpondenoe 



Sho eaujfht the white jri)ose by the leg: 
A K0080— 'twas no ii:icnt iiiattor: 

The troose let fall a golden ogg 
With cackle and with clatter. 

She dropt the jir<x)se and caug:ht the pelf. 
And run to tell lier iieijfhbors; 

And bless'd herself, and cursed herself. 
And rested from her labors." 

—Tennyson. 

Our readers may possibly 
think that the foregoing poem 
is rather far-fetched. But after 
all, when rightly considered, it 
contains some food for reflec- 
tion. There are a great many 
people who have a hard strug- 
gle in life, and often when 
everything seems darkest and 
the surroundings are the most 
discouraging, they are nearest 
port. It is an old saying that 
"The darkest hour is just be- 
fore day." This old lady in 
the rhyme saw an opportunity 
and she didn't wait to ask how 
old the goose was; whether it 
was fat or lean; or whether, on 
the whole, she had better ac- 
cept or decline. She took it 
"too quick," and in seizing the 
first good piece of fortune in- 
stanter, another and a greater 
one immediately followed. In 
acquiring a competence, the 
first thousand dollars is gener- 
ally the most ditficult to ac- 
quire. Many times people 
work long and hard and have 
to practice rigid economy to 
get a start, and then get into 
the right current and drift on 
to fortune with apparent ease. 
But such people never refuse 
splendid opportunities, or turn 
their backs on small things. It 
IS the easiest thing in the world 
to make money if you only get 
into the right drift. The old 
lady had faith that the goose 
was a good one, and she "caughi; 
on" so quick that the goose 
yielded up a golden egg and the 
poor woman's fortune was made. 
Now, ycu may smile when we 
apply the moral to something 
practical. It would have been 
no more unwise for the dear old 
lady to have refused to accept 
the goose till she had first been 
introduced to the stranger and 
ascertained that he was of a re- 
spectable family, than it is for 
vou to stand hesitating as to 
whether you should buy lots in 
Crosley Park at the giveaway 
prices we are offering. In 
a year from now we will all 
see how ridiculous it was for 
Mr. Crosley to sell such fine 
property at such prices (to say 
nothing of the terms) and for 
you to stand by loo'cing on when 
you should have known that val- 
ues must inevitably make such 
large advances in so shoit a 
time. When spring opens up 
(and there is but one more 
month of winter) there will be 
from fifty to one hundred new 
houses built in Crosley Park 
and Lester Park adjoining. 
Within six months suburban 
trains will run each way every 
half hour from 6 a. m. till mid- 
night, and the fare will proba- 
bly be the same as street car 
fare. Then, too, within a year 
you can build a $50,000 lesi 
dence down there if you wish, 
and you can have water, sewers 
and electric lights the same as 
you have in Duluth. All these 
things are now assured, and 
those who buy Crosley Park 
lots by the quantity at present 
prices will make big money. 
We propose to advance prices 
soon and we suggest that it 
would be a good idea to buy 
before that time; i e, if you 
care to niake money. There is 
always a time to buy and a time 
to sell, and now is the time to 
buy lots at Crosley Park, and 
any time during the next five 
} ears you will have opportuni- 
ties of selling so as to make 
large profits. Call at the ofllice 
and get further information. 



C. L LOm & CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 




TEMF^LE OPERA. 



DK. GEO. B. HAYCOCK, 



Manager 



Two Nights of Meiiiment 

HOIDAT IKD TDESDil, 

JAN. 27 and 28. 

Fi rst appearance here of 

W. \V. TILLOTSON'S 

Meiif Comedy Comp'f 

In the Nev York success of two seasons. 

ZIG 



ON 



MONEY TO LOAN 
IMPROVED PROPERTY 
F. H. BARNARD, 
ROOM 16 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



Cleaned, 



QSTRICH FEATHERS 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER.noe Second St. East. 



WANTS, FOB SULE. ETC 



ONE CENT A WORD IN ADVANCE. 



Presented wl h the oritrinul cast, headed 
the charming- soubrette, ANNA BOYD. 



by 



Sale of seatJ Thursday, Jan. 23. 
in prices. 



advance 



PEOPLES THEATER. 



DULUTH, 



JOHN 8. BARNES, Mgr. 



Ttie Oest Viinety Show in the Norttiwest 



This we€k, commencing JAN. 

MOKRISKT & KICH'.S 



20. 



Ill-STilll COMED! COMPAN! 



iVDMISSION: 

TO GALLERY, lOc; Pit, 25c; Orchestra chairs, 
36c; Boxes, 50c. 



Advertisements under this head received at 
the loUowiuK places, besides the business of- 
llco ol 'llie Herald : 

Kndiou Pharmacy, 127 Tenth avenue east. 
Bojce & Totman, corner Fourth avenue 

and biipcrior street west. 

J. W. NelM>n, No. iSul, corner Eifhteouth 
avenue west unu lju|>eriur street. 

U. Jol>n»uu, chief clerk Phillips hotel. West 
Duluth. 



Help Wanted. 

WANTED-A cook for a small family, 
quire, oJU Eiu^i beixjud street. 



In 



Ay ANIED— A boy at St. Lukes hospital. 

WANTED— Competent jfirl for housework: 
ouc Uiat can cook. Tvo in lamily. 
Apply brown Brothers, 19 West Superior 



WANTED— Competent ^irl for general 
housoworii iu small family. Apply 14(0 
Bench street 



AlOCNO MAN williutf U) work can find an 
evtimig job by uppiyiDK to the circuia- 
lo.. Herald ottiue, between a ana 1 p. m 



IW isll to employ a few ladles on salary to 
take charge of my bubiuess at their homes. 
i^Ufhi, Very laociuai.UK aud bealthlui. W aires 
tlu per weeit. Ueleitjuce jfiven. liood pay lor 
pan time. Address with stamp, Mrs. Marion 
rt alKer, Ijouisviile, Ky. 



W AM ED— A miUdle-ajfed man to look 
alter liolel olhce aud wail on table at the 
Oliver bouse, Jb,iy, Miuu. liood waifes to the 
right mau. Apply to Ailrtd Galon, city hall. 



WANTliD— A ifirl for general house work; 
lamily ol I tii-ee. Call ui forenoon, 411 
N uiiL areuue easu 



>^{iO 



Doors open lit 7:30; performance commences 
at 8:30. 



feALAUV, HO expenses In advance, 
allowed eacli moiiib. &ieady em- 

Hvj.) lin^iii ill Uome or Iraveuug. No souciuug. 

Dutiea acUvenug and maJuug collections. No 

IKibtai cirus. AUOress With stamp. Hater ti 

Co., l'i(iuu, Ohio. 



WANTED-Pastry cook, 
luquiie Vbiuips hotel. 



also other help. 



WANTED — At the Womaus Employment 
Uuivau, ill superior street eaat, two 
stcoud giiiB aud a uu^eu girls lor general 
house wurK. Employ meat obtained tree of 
cost. Mis. A. D. Ayers. 



BA 



SJPECIAL 



1 
J 




l''ur Sale. 

SALE OF FUKNITUKE-Mr. K. T. FlUey. 
being about lo leave lUe city, will ofter at 
til ivaie bale, al his resiueiice. No. tOi Eai>t 
becoud btreet, upou Salurday, Jan. Sdih, from 
10 a. m. to 6 p. m., ail lub tiousehoiu luriiiture, 
cai-pets, aiietieu uteusUs, etc., etc. 



TL"^OK SALE— A heavy working team cheap 
X; at A. VV. Eiiers 'Mi Lake avenue south. 

ir^OB SALE— Forty acres for sale, near the 
JL2 cay, at Jwj per acres. Ouly ilouu down; 
Lia.iauce ou time lo buil purchaser. A great 
big buup tor somebody. Call ou tricsou, Mrum 
Ac Co., aii PasloJ-et-Sieusou building. 



I 60 Acres in 9-49- 1 6. 



80 



40 



320 



9-49-15. 



48 



80 
-15. 



I -49- 1 5. 
35-48- 1 5. 
Water Front, 



J.^OH SALE— Mj rebldeuce with 60 or 100 feet 
J ai 31u Last Bocoua btreet. Terms to suit 
parchaaer. E. A. liiibert, iSl Board ol I'rade. 

HEAVV UOKSES FOU SALE— 16 bead of 
btavy horses, raised al Lake Para, on 
im; Northern I'licitic road, lor sale by C. W. 
±iarvey. can l>e seen at Uowara baru. ou the 
laae shore, Miuuesoia i>oiut. Uebideuce, SSS 
Vi est Fourth street. 



Lost. 

charm, A. O. U. W. badge. 

liberally rewarded by i-e- 

It to li. T. Foiler, !i East Superior 



LOST— Watch 
l-'inder wiil be 



luruiug 
8 1 reel. 



J OSl— Part of a gold-link cuff button iu 
JLi bhape of three rings. Lost in Superior 
Ol Duluth. Fiuaer win receive rewai-d by 
ieaviug the same at my office. Uobert G . Mc-- 
Doweii, yK-<*est Suptrior street. 



2 Grs nd Avenue lots. 

2 Lots on Central Avenue. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $1750. 

I Cottage Hou^e, with 
well, West Duluth, $1 180. 

I Cottage House, with 
well. West Duluth, $2000. 



fur lieut. 

TTlOlt KENT— Two warm, comfortable rooms 
Xj al reabouable terms. Apply SJW West 
.Aiicliigaii rlieet. 

AUtt KEN 1— D».sirable room: bath, gaa, 
sieam, etc.; private family. Address 8., 



iierald oUiue, 



Wanted— To Reut. 

WANTED— A furnished house for the win- 
ter. L. J. Taussig, No. tf Phoenix block. 



Itoard and ItoouiH. 



rpwo BOOMS, heated and lighted, with 
A. board, in a private family, W 60 per week, 
li t^ourth avenue east. 



FlnanciaL 

DULLTH MOKTGAGK LOAN COMPANY 
loans money in any amount on f urnt- 
lure. pianos, horses aud wagons without re- 
moval tiom owners possession; also on ware- 
house leceipts, bank slocks, aud any property 
ot value; notes discountea; partial paymenu 
received auu your own time granted lor pay- 
pent; uo delay; money on baud and furnished 
Immediauny after security is appro vea. Wm. 
Horkau. Manager, Koom Li. targusson block. 
Duluth, Minu. 



IF VOU WISH TO SELL OK BLV DVtVTH 
or Superior bank stock, corporation or In- 
^ estmeut securities, call ou or address B. Mur- 
phiu. broker. « Bauuing block. Duluth. Minn. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Terms on Hoises, U Cash, Balance 
l.hnd I years at B Percent. 



XT **• WILSON, ATTORNEY AND COITN- 
J3| • sellor at Law. Will practice in State 
aud cnitL<d States CV>urts. AU business given 
Mx>mpt attention, 44 Fargusson Block, Duluth, 

■pLASTEKlNG. 

H, T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobbing 
promptly attended to. Office, room D. Hun- 
ter block. " 



H, P, MILLS, 



U11 m 411 FlilSI IJITIOillL BANK BUILDING. 



A^KS. J. S. DINWOODIK, 

lieacher of Piano Forte, Voice and Sight Slnr- 
lug. Chorus and Choir CouducUir. 

Music rooms at J. J. WlggUWs, le Baat Sn 
perior street, and at residence. mTenthiare.It 



■VTB. H. PA&KBB fiOBINSON. 

VOCAL iNSTaucrnoN. 

8 MILES BLOCK. 



1VTCMILLEN& 8TEBBLN8, ABCHITECTB 



EattSn^ll^^^^ 



i 





r 

'! 



« 












'i > . I ■ 



nap^r— jTi 



•SBW^ii 



DUIiTJTH EVENING HEBAL.D JANTTABT 24 1890. 



BEFORE THE CONVENIION. 



Collection of Suggestive 
Pointers From Poli- 
ticians 



Is Not Very Much Doubt About 
the Aldermanic Con- 
test, 



But 



the Mayoralty Qu^l 
Seems to Bother a 
Good Deal. 



on 



The republican caucuses for the elec- 
tion of delegates to the convention, to be 
held tomorrow afternoon at the city hall, 
are in progress as the gentle reader scans 
The Herald. 

This morning has not changed the 
political situation to any great extent; at 
teust not on the surface, except that 
there is a good ileal of excitement as to 
who will be ma/or. A new candidate 
is announced this morning, endorsed 
by several labor organizations. 
Alderman M. J. Davis comes out with 
quite a strong backing and takes the 
place of Alva \V. Bradley, who declines 
to run. Mr. Davis is honest, and his 
candidacy is claimed to be endorsed 
by a large number of the Scan- 
dinavians of the city. If Mr. Davis runs 
as an independent candidate he will 
make a grave mistake both for himself 
and the party. Liist evening the demo- 
cratic primaries were held, and the fol- 
lowing were chosen delegatoir to the city 
convention: 

First warU ~F. L. Kj-aa, James Brown. Wni. 
Poirier, Cbas. A. Banks, Wnj. Meier. 

Seooud ward— Chas. d'Autreuiout, Jr., VF. P. 
Heimbath 

Thinl ward— Henry Truelsen. Simon Clark. 
T. M. Holiuski. A. M. Morison, Frank Plut- 
nitzki. ^am Lundberg. James Farrell. N. J. 
Miller. I. Gurlcz. E. FleblKtr. 

Kourth ward— C. M. Vaiii«, John Flood, Jas. 
McCahiU, K. L. Cutting. James A. Siaitb. Goo. 
De Coursey. F. T. Little, M. B. Harrison. M. 
Hoppa, T. T. Hudson. Andrew Marshall, 
Cleopbas Trembley. 

Fifth wa*^— J. J. Crowley. Joseph Kyan, 
John Dowling. B. G. Segojf, Ur. Pearson, 'Ihos. 
Sp llman, 1 uuiel O'Connell. 

Sixth ward— D. si. McKay, Thomas Perry, A. 
Wiley. 

J. K. Shaw is undoubtedly the choice 
of the delegates, and a hard struggle will 
be made for his election. He has strong 
support and will poll a good vote. A 
matter of ureat interest to the repub- 
licans IS the result of tomorrows conven- 
tion. As to whom the delegates will 
choose as the mayoralty nominee is a 
matter of much doubt, and cannot be 
settled by tonight's caucus. 

In the First ward. — Two aldermen are 
to be elected here. At least five men 
have avowed their candidacy. On the 
republican ticket James Dingwall and 
Charles .\. Beattie are the probable can- 
didates. Both have served in 
city legislation. Paul Sorensen 
has stated his intention to run 
on the democ-ratic labor ticket. J. F. 
Hector is also a candidate on a republi- 
can labor combination. Thos. Timlin is 
also mentioned. Tomorrow may see 
other candidates in the tield. 

The Second wara:— There are three 
candidates in this ward for a seat in the 
council. On the straight republican 
ticket D. J. Sinclair will run, while Jas. 
Seville will probably receive demo- 
cratic support. B. F. Howard is in the 
field as an independent, and is finding 
strong support. Giles Gilbert is also 
spoken of by many. 

The Third ward. — As yet but two can- 
didates have positively presented them- 
selves for the suffrages of Third ward- 
itee. treorge F. Ash will probably lead 
the republican ticket, while E. Kugler 
will stand as independent for re-elec- 
tion. It is uncertam whom the demo- 
crats will put in nomination. 

The quiet Fourth ward. — There is a 
bustle and a scramble in the Fourth 
ward, although on the surface but one 
candidate has appeared. Kobert Lou- 
den, the present incumbent, will stand 
for the aldermanship. It is 

not impossible that Zeke Kendall 
may oppose him. S. F. W'adhams, M. S. 
Burrows and others are talketl of for the 
place. Party managers are bustling 
about, and names of candidates will be 
announced before night. 

The Fifth ward. — The way things look 
now C. O. Nelson will be the republican 
candidate. On the democratic ticket H. 
C. Nelson will run, while William Butch- 
art is also up for the position. 

In the "only" Sixth, as usual, politics 
are at a white heat. Almost every man 
in the ward is up for alderman, con- 
sequently things are somewhat mixed. 
So far there are only five candidates up. 
but at least seven more are spoken of. 
S. A. Siverts is the probable candidate 
on the republican ticket, although S. M. 
Ijeeter and W. M. Hubbard are spoken 
of frequently for the position. On the 
democratic ticket D. S. McKee will run, 
while James Kooney is after the position 
through lalxir vote, if he is nominated. 



W EST EN D. 

A Peraliar Accident to » FasHenger Car; 
General News, 
A most peculiar accident occurred at 
Garfield avenue crossing yesterday after- 
noon about 4 o'clock. The Northern 
Pacitic-East train was just pulling out 
of Rices Point, and someone turned the 
last switch, but turned it back into posi- 
tion before the hind trucks of the 
vestibule car could pass over. As a 
result of this mistake the hind part of 
the car went crashing into the St. Paul 
I& Duluth Short line engine which had 
been stationed on the crossing. The 
headlight of the Short line locomotive 
was knocded off amd the car was badly 
damaged, a hole about foui feet square 
being made in the end. Who it was 
that turned the switch i« not positively 
known, but it is believed to be rtjme boy. 
M. Stein and wife went to Winnipeg 
yesterday. 

F. H. White went to Tower yesterday 
on a short business trip. 

I»uis Swanson is very ill with typhoid 
at the home of N. Mortenson. 

James Warnock, the feed man, is in 
St. Marys hospital sutferiug both from 
typhoid and the grip. 

W. H. Marks, a land explorer w^ho re- 
cently came here, is very ill at the Clar- 
endon. 

The "mum" social at the Estey Read- 
ing room commences at T :30 p. m. Every- 
one is invited to attend. If you keep 
"mum" it will not cost you anything, 
but if you talk you must pay ten cents. 
T. D. Craig is receiving a great boom 
from the young men. They all swear by 
him. 

The French people of the Sixth ward 
have put up Jas. Kooney for their can- 
didate. 

The race at Erickson's rink last night 
was very interesting to many spectators. 
The race was won by Miss Mattie Les- 
ter who came in fully a quarter of a 
length ahead of her competitors. Satur- 
day night there will be a masquerade at 
the rink. 

The masquerade at Twentieth avenue 
rink proved quite an attraction. The 
first prize, a gold pen and holder, was 
given to Mrs. A. Jurgensen. The second 
prize was given to Fred Steigler. The 
third prize was given to Charles Gustaf- 
son. Next Saturday evening the first of 
a series of races will be held at the rink 
to determine the championship of the 
West End. 



BoeBY 6UIINS' BiemoiiY 



Is to be Celebrated in Due Form 

by ,Scotias Sons 

Tonight, 



Those Who Will Take Leading 

Parts and What They 

Will Do. 



School TreaKurem and Clerks. 

In view of the fact that several 
changes in the ranks of district school 
treasurers and clerks have occurred in 
St. Louis county, and that scarcely any- 
one is familiar with those officials, The 
Herald gives a list of clerks and treas- 
urers in every shool district in the 
countv: 



Duluth. 
Pnrk Pt. 
Dis. No. 
Dis. No. 
Dis. No. 
Dis. No. 
Di*. No. 
Dis. No. 
Dis. No. 
Dis. No. 
Dis. No. 



Treasurer. 
P. W. Paine 
Walter Murry 
Freeman Keen 
John Smith 
W. C. Sarjfent 
Nich. Anderson 



One Hundred ami titty Si^andlnavlanii 
Talk. 

The Scandia publishes the following, 
which, it is asserted, is given more to 
free the Scandinavian business men of 
the city from the imputation of having 
been on the side of the rioters in the 
troubles of last July, than to push Mr. 
Hall for mayor, especially as he states he 
has declined to run: 

As M. O. Hall, one of the candidates most 
prominently mentioned for mayor, has been 
represented a» not imvinjf the support of the 
Scandinavians, we hereby promise him our 
full and hearty supfiort, in the event that he 
fets the uoruinatioii. 

Berut Johnson. Ulaf Stcoson. I. T. Bre<ie8on, 
C. S. .Strom. John Watfeustein. t'h. W. Ericson, 
C. A. Turning, p. A. Sjoselius, A. Borgen. A 
H. Thompson, A. Granegtcen, Th Hooe, Ncls 
CarlsoD. I. Hector, L. <J. Hultjerg, Tlios olaf- 
90n, S. GjfS<iahl. Ok- A. Ber^. J. H. Nordby. U. 
C. Reltan, O. K. 11. mjix. Ant. Grouseth. And. 
RlDgsrud, U. K lloljc, O. L. K«)en,T. A.Sather, 
A. a. Lan^ and l.ju others. 



Clerk. 
George Kupley 
A. C. Uobinson 
E. H. Hall 
E Koussain 
W. T. Hooker 
R. E. Carey 

Anton HomlMjrgr John Mylnarek 
John Scbuman James Lindlterg 
7..0.Gulbrandsen D. H. Petterson 
8. .Martin Lepak Joseph Labud 
9..E. P. Morcom Chas. C. Oppel 
Dis. No. 10. F. Block H. W. Nolan 

Dis. No. 11.. Ellen A. Knight James Croke 
Dis. No. 12. George Palmer A. C. Camp 
Dis. No. 13. J. D. Moon S. F. Denney 

The list is correct as far as reported to 
the county auditor, but the treasurer of 
District No. 5. went otT by the gun route 
a couple of weeks ago, and the treasurer 
of No. 10 is in a financial muddle and 
has taken a vacation. 

.Sold at Duluth Prices. 

A hearing was had yesterday before 
the railroad commissioners in the case 
of Norris & Son, against the Manitoba 
and Northern Pacific railroads. Norris 
& Son are wheat buyers at Ortonville, 
and their complaints are that they carry 
wheat from Morris to Minneapolis and 
Duluth free of charge and make a dis- 
crimination. The ground for their 
charges is that the wheat buyers at 
Morris pay Minneapolis and Duluth 
prices for grain. An attorney for the 
Northern Pacific appeared and asked for 
a continuance. The final hearing of the 
case was postponed until Tuesday. 
President Hulbert of the Interstate 
Grain company disclaims that the roads 
have agreed to take wheat free, or that 
they have discriminated. The high 
prices at Motris were due to a fight be- 
tween elevator companies. 

The <>r«at Northern Railway. 

The St. Paul, Minneapolis & Manitoba 
Railway company will cease to exist Feb. 
1, and its entire system, including the 
main line, Eastern Minnesota, Montana 
Central, Duluth, Watertown & Pacific, 
and Wiilmar &, Sioux Falls branches and 
some minor branches, like the Moorhead 
Northern and Moorhead & Southeastern, 
as well as the Northern Steamship com- 
pany, will be transferred to the Great 
Northern Railway company, and all will 
be managed by the officers of that com- 
pany. A meeting of the directors will 
be held in St. Paul previous to Feb. 1, 
when the officers will be elected. It is 
presumed, of course, that Mr. Hill will 
be the president and Mr. Clough vice- 
president, as of the old Manitoba com- 
pany. 

SPORTING NOTES. 



O Thou, my Muse, grutd auld Scotch Drink; 
Whether thro" wlmpling worms thou Jink, 
Or, richly brown, roam o'er the brink. 

In glorius faem; 
Inspire me. till I lisp and wink. 

To .«liig thy name: 

Clan Stewart will celebrate the 130th 
anniversary of the birth of Robert 
Burns, the great lyric poet of Scotland, 
tonight. 

The various committees having the 
banquet in charge are as follows: Amuse- 
ment committee. Dr. Harris, Robert 
Crombie, George Chalmers, Murdo Mc- 
Kenzie, Alex. Wilson, (Jeo. H. McKenzie, 
James McDowall; reception committee, 
all the above and H. L. McDonald, John 
Stewart, John Brown, Alexander McKae, 
Roljert Wilson, James McCJhie, Colin 
Thomson, Angus McFarlane; Hoor, Jas. 
Staples, C. D. Campbell, James D. Mc- 
Kenzie, Alex Steele, H. E. Mclntyre. 

The program, which is given below, is 
a carefully-preparetl one, and is, as will 
be seen, composed entirely of selections 
appropriate to the occasion. "Bobby" 
bFurns has always held a warm place in 
the hearts ol his countrymen of Auld 
Scotia, not only on account of his extra- 
ordinary talents as a poet and writer, 
but because he was one of the people 
and had to struggle all through his 
young life with poverty and misfortune. 
His first verses in the Scottish dialect 
which attracted attention were composed 
in his IGth year. Bi-rns' first financial 
adventure, which was farming in part- 
nership with his brother, resulted disas- 
trously. White preparing to embark for 
Jamaica he published a collection of 
poems to defray his expenses, which were 
so favorably received he was prevailed 
on to remain in his native land. 

His name is endeared to every true 
Scot, and his memory will be revived to- 
night at the banquet where 
he will be toasted in elo- 
quent speech and in exer- 
cises afterwards, in which Scotch 
songs and dialectic declamations will 
figure. The members of Clan Stewart 
will undoubtedly have a bran time to- 
night. It is to be supposed that none 
will be fou' after the banquet, but that 
they will a' have plenty, that the in- 
jnnction ye maun pit some butter in 
your brose, will be heeded. The pro- 
gram which follows will give an excel- 
lent idea of the nature of the evening 
which the canny Scots will enjoy at the 
St. Louis: 

March to the diningroom, led by Clan Piper 
McLean. 

Chairman Chief Simon Clark 

Croupier Tanist W. A. Cant 

Blessing Clansman. Kev. B. Mitchell 

Supper. 
Chairman's Address. 

Song QleeClub 

Waltz song— "Bird on the Wing" Auguste 

Mrs. Franklin Paine. 

Hecitation— "Kobert Burns" 

Master Thomas Chalmers 

Toast Kobert Burns 

Clansman Colin Thomson. 

Song 'Tarn Glenn," 

Mrs. R. O. McKeuzio. 

Dance Highland Fling 

Prof. J. S. Moon. 

Toast "Our Adopted Country" 

Clansman K. M. Hunter. 

Song "Selected" 

Glee Club. 
Selections on Bagpipes, "March of tlxe Mc- 
Kenzie HighlandtTS" and "Lord Paii- 

mure's March" 

.. .Clansmen J. S. Moon and Colin Thomson 

Toast "The Ladies" 

Clansman Robert Crombie. 

Recitation "The Great Hiclan' Bagpipes" 

Clansman Angus Gibson. 

"Aulil Lang Syne." 

By the Company. 



He Has Real^ned. 

W. T. Rorbach, deputy United States 
collector, under Collector Horace B. 
Moore, has resigned his position and ex- 
pects to leave the office soon. He has 
been a competent, trustworthy and 
thoroughly gentlemanly official for two 
years. He has already bought the gro- 
cery business of Strate Bros., on Tenth 
avenue east and Superior street, and will 
take charge as soon as his successor is 
named. His many friends wish him sue 
cess. 



KEEP RIGHT ON GUESSING. 



Seventy-five Dollars Cash to 
Closest Guessers 
Duluth. 



on 



Two Prizes Offered for the 

Contest; from Now to 

May. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 



FREE DISPENSARy AND READING ROOIVI, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table is supplied and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 




D8:E.G. Wests 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Specific for Hydtt'ria. DlMines« f'lts, Neuraliria, Wake 
fulnexH, MentuI IVprriuion. Soneriinirof the liraln re 
^_ultin^c in in»nnlty ami loiullntr to misery ik-rav ami 
jleath. Prtnwliire Olil .\|r<'. H.ii renm-ss. Lili, irl I'ower 
in either »ex. liivoliiniiiry Losses, ami Sperinnlorihcca 
lausert hy overexertion of llu- brain, helr-atm.-e oj 
over-indulgt-nce. Each box contains one month's treai- 

vtV.'i 'i ' ''""• "'' "'" '<"' •''• ""t ''V mail pr.'i):u.|. 
»llh ea.h f>r<ler for six lioxes. will M'ml puriliasor 
/-naranu-e to rcfuna money il' the treatuit ni laila to 
aire. Uuaraut«es IsaueU anil tjeiiuuie suia oiUy by 

Boyce & Totman. Phoenix Drug Store, and 
7 West Superior street, sole agrents, Duluth, 
Minn. 



The Water .Supply. 

Direct pressure is being used today in 
pumping the city water supply, and as a 
result the pressure is low and tluctuat- 
ing, the range being between sixty and 
eighty pounds. A resident on Fourth 
street says that he has been without 
water for the past ten days till yester- 
day. Consequently all that time the 
vicinity was deprived of the tire pro- 
tection guaranteed by the company. "It 
is not likely, however," said the gentle- 
man, "that the water bills will be cut 
down a cent. Is there any way to com- 
pel the water company to live up to its 
guarantee," asks the same authority. 
With eighty pounds pressure Fourth 
street people do not get any water, and 
this has been the state of things for 
some time. 



If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root & Co.'8 ad. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 

£ast Knd SkaUng Rink. 
David N. Morison, champion fast 
skater of Duluth, and W. W. Brown, 
champion fast skater of Wisconsin, will 
skate a race for ^jO a side at the rink to- 
night. Walkers Military band will be 
in attendance. 



The Denver team is to be taken to Hot 
Springs by the ball player, Manager 
Rrtwe, about March 1. 

Pete Sweeney, who covered third for 
the Browns a short while last season, 
has Ijeen signed by President Von der 
Ahe. He was formerly a member of the 
Washington League club. 

Official notice has been promulgated 
of the admission of .Jersey City, Trenton 
and Providence to the Atlantic associa • 
tion. 

D. O. Earle of Worcester, has been 
elected captain of Harvard's freshmen 
eight. The crew will be selected in a 
short time. The freshmen will not row 
the Columbia freshmen this year, but 
will meet Yale alone. 

The Chicago Players' club and the 
Cincinnati and Louisville clubs have 
agents in St. Louis to corral Lathan as 
soon as he reaches the town from San 
Francisco. 

The Indianapolis club is negotiating 
with Tom O'Connor of Boston. He 
played at Canandaigua in '89. He is 
considered a great batter, age 23, tall 
and weighs 18U pounds. He has played 
at Providence, Xashville, Rochester and 
with the Boston Reserves. 

It is rumored that there is some 
trouble over The Sporting Times prop- 
erty. John B. Day has sued Pete Dono- 
hue for $.30,000, and Pete has sued Mr. 
Day for ^10,000. If the former wins, it 
will cripple P. Jay tinancially for a few 
weeks. 

George Munson has resigned the secre- 
taryship of the St. Louis club. He and 
Von der Ahe had a row as soon as he 
reached St. Louis from San Francisco, 
and the upshot was the resignation. Mr. 
Von der Ahe thought that Munson ought 
to have been able to capture Comiskey 
on the trip, and also accused him of 
being a Brotherhood sympathizer. 

John Clarkson has been interviewed in 
Boston. He thinks that Xash, Richard- 
son and Bennett will yet be signed by 
the old League. He says that the two 
former had been wavering in their 
allegiance to the Brotherhood even in 
California, where they had heard noth- 
ing but the Brotherhood side. He 
thinks that when the men are alone a 
little missionary work will win some of 
them over. He expresses great doubt 
whether Kelly has signed a contract. 



Indian river oranges at Victor Huot's. 

Notice the new bargains offered in J. 
M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



"Bobby Barns" .\nniver8ary. 
Chicago, Jan. 24. — This is the anni- 
versary of the birth of "Bobby Burns" 
and the event will be commemorated at 
the Auditorium this afternoon and even- 
ing by one of the grandest festivals ever 
held in honor of the poet inthiscountrj-. 
Rev. George C. Lorimer will be the 
orator of the day, and a special ovent 
will be a trial of strength between picked 
men from the Highland association and 
Irishmen from Company C, First regi- 
ment. Over 5000 tickets for the festival 
have been sold. 



TONIGH T'S CO NCERT. 

The Home-Talent Convert of the Mozarts 
Thi? Evening. 

The Mozart concert will be given at 
Temple Opera tonight. A feature which 
should appeal to the patriotic instincts 
of Duluthians is that there is no im- 
ported talent,but that all the participants 
in the program are Duluth musicians. 
That this is the case will in no wise de- 
tract from the excellence of the program. 
The artists are Mr. Gerard Tonning and 
Madame Beaulieu, both well-known and 
highly-accomplished musicians; Miss, 
French, the Presbyterian church soprano, 
who at her debut a few days ago made 
such a favorable impression; Mr. 
H. P. Robinson, director of the 
Apollo club, who will appear both in 
solo and other parts; the Misses Cos- 
tello, Miss Bostwick and Mrs. Gunnis, 
all highly accomplished pianists. The 
program will not be tediously long, con- 
sisting only of seven numbers. It will 
consist entirely of classical music and is 
as follows: 

Rondo op 73 for two pianos Chopin 

Maaame Ueaulicu and Gerard Tonnlu(r. 

Lorely — Soprano solo jjiszt 

Miss French. 

Symphony -D Major Haydn 

(Arraugfied for two pianos and eight hands.) 
Adagio, Allegro, Andante, Mlnuetto, Alio, 
con brio. 

Madame Beaulieu, Misses Coatello and Bost- 
wick and Uerard Tonnlog. 

Duel— Vocal Ooldbeck 

Miss French and Mr. Bohinson. 

Komance— Two pianos Batter 

Madame Beaulieu and Mr. Tonning. 

Terisetto— From ridelio Beethoven 

Miss French. Mrs. Gunnis and Mr. Kohinson. 

Kural dance and pr<x;e8sion Satter 

Madame B eaulie u and Mr. To nning. 



[Notice that all city letters put in the 
Duluth postoftice must have two cents 
prepaid, otherwise The Herald will not 
receive the guesses, for it will not pay 
postage on "guess" letters.] 

Keep on guessing, friends, for The 
Herald's two prizes! Bear in mind that 
the way is open till the census enumer 
ators begin their work, and that you can 
guess early, late and as often as you 
please. It is only necessary to clip a 
coupon from the pa|)er from day to day, 
write your guess and name upon it, 
varying your guess at will, and turn it 
in to The Herald as directed by mail or 
messenger or personally. Lots of 
guesses have already been put in, but 
we look for thousands more. It is a 
very simple and easy chance to try your 
skill as a calculator or your l.uck as a 
gueeser, and the prizes aro well worth 
trying for. Fifty dollars in gold for the 
best guess, and twenty-five dollars 
in gold for the next best. First 
come, first served with the 

prizes. Guess once and guess again. 

There has always been great interest 
attached to the figures of population of 
Duluth. This will be es[)ecially the 
case this year, as the last government 
census gave us a total of :3740 people, 
anil it is almost certain that no city in 
the United States has ever shown such 
a jjercentage of growth as will Duluth. 
How many inhabitants has Duluth ? 
That is a question for the readers of The 
Herald to answer. By '"Duluth" is meant 
the city proper. West Duluth, Lakeside 
and Lester Park, all to all intents and 
purposes parts of the city. 

The Herald proposes to make it an 
object for its readers to guess as to the 
number of people in the city and the 
whree adjoining suburbs mentioned 
above. In brief. The Herald will offer 
prizes to the two i)er8on8 guessing the 
number or nearest the number of 
inhabitants shown by the returns 
of the census enumerators. The Herald 
will give to such successful guessers two 
cash prizes, 

First PrI/e $50 In Gold, Second Prize $2r> 
In Gold. 

Guesses will be received at this office 
until the day when the enumerators of 
the census begin their work. 



Population Contest Coupon. 

My guess as to the number of inhabitants 
in Duluth. West Duluth, Lakeside and 
Lester Park to be shown by returns of the 
census enumerators in the summer of lt<MO 
is as follows: 
Whole number of inhabitanto — 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, ( „ 
CiJUNTY (W St. Lol'is. s 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial District. 

In the matter of the estate of Frank Diandrea, 
insolvent. Order for limiting time to file 
reloaees. 

Tpon reading and flllnjf the petition of 
Simon Clark, receiver in the above entitUnl 
matter, and it appearing to the court that 
crtMiliors of Frank Diandrea are reouirtid to 
file releases before participating in tlie l)ene- 
fltsor fiaid estate. 

Now therefore, it is ordered that all creditors 
cifsaid Frank Diandrea desiring to participate 
In the dividends of salil estate be, and are 
liereby re<iuired, to file their duly executed 
lelcases with the Clerk of the District Court of 
the Eleventh Judicial District on or lK3fore the 
aith day of February, A. D. 1S90. 

That due notice of this order be jfiven, by 
publishing the same three times within five 
day.s from the date hereof, in The Duluth 
Evening Herald, and by mailing a copy of 
this notice to each of the known creditors of 
said Frank Diandrea. 

Dated Duluth, .Minn., Jan. aSrd, A. D. 189(). 
By the Court, 

(.». P. Steaks, Judge. 



HARWOOD'S 

City Transportation Freight and Express, 

DRAYS. 



OfBoe, 17 First Avenue West. 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFICE 



17 First Avenue West. 



SCHILLING'S ORCHESTRA 



Any Nunnber of Pieces Furnished. 



ROOM 41* PASIOR[I-SI[IISOII BLOCK, 

DULUTH, - - MINN. 



Humphreys' 

Ur. Hi MriiiU'.isMi;< IKK s .•»^^•^cit■ntinl allv.-jud 
carefully preijanil prt-siriptioiis ; um'iI formally 

?farslnprlvateurarilcewithMuicess,aiiilffirover 
blrtv years u.sfdliy till- pfoplc. Kvcry single Spe- 
clllcji) a special curt- for Hit) Ulsoast nanied. 

These Specifics cure without drugglni;, purg- 
ing or reducing the itystem, and are lu fact ami 
deed the aaverelsB remedies of theWorld. 



UBT or PUKCIPAI. HOd. CUBKS. 

1 FeTers, ConRestlon, inflammation. 
3 Wormn, Worm Kev<<r. Worm I'oiic . 

3 CrylnK Colic, orTttthliiK of Infants 

4 Diarrhea, of clilldren <ir Adults 

9 DvBentery, OrlplUK, Bilious CoUc. 
6 Choi ''- ■ 



'ko 



_ rbuM, Vomiting. 

J C'oagfafi, Cold, Hrouihltls 

n Neuralgia, Toolharhe, Kaceacbe 



PHICES. 

.US 



euraigla, 

eadarhen, Slcklieailache, Vertigo 



9 He 
10 DyNpei>8la,.B!ll 



lus stomach. 



1.3 Croop, < 
14 ^alt Kh 



HuppreaHed or Painful PeriodH. 

1-i Whit en, tooProfu.se ICrlfKls 

CoUK'li. IMfHcult lireathlng ... 

- .Iheum, Krysltjclas, Kruptlons. 

13 KfaeumatlNm, Kheumatlo Pains 

Hi Fever and Aicae, Chills, MaUrlu 

17 Plle«, VH'-'iorHleedtnif 

19 t'niarrh, lufliiciiza. Cola in the Head 
'.iO Whooping Conghk "<olpnt Coughs. 
'2i tii-nernl llehllil y, ^ hysloalWcakncss 

'^7 Kidney ItiHcntie 

•ZS Nervous l>eltility- 1 

30 I rinary Wenkiiesn, Wotting Bed. 
a'-i l>iiieaiieHortbelIeart,PalpiUUonl 



.'23 

.'is 

.23 

.as 

.i.-i 
.'23 
.tt3 



.30 
..50 

M 

,30 

,oo 

:a8 



A'anie of gaentmr — 



Residence of guesiter — 



Date, Jan. S4, 18»0. 



The Mozart Soiree Muslcale. 

The tifth soiree Musicale of the Mo- 
zart association of Duluth will be held 
in the Temple Opera house on Friday 
evening, 24th inst., at 8 o'clock. 

Admittance on membership cards, 
which must be shown at the door. A 
limited number of tickets will be sold to 
persons not members at 81 each. Said 
tickets (which admit only one person) 
can be had at Dwyer's music store and 
at the door. 

The program for this musicale will be 
made up entirely of home talent and 
by our best musicians, including Miss 
French, Madame Beauleau, H. P. Robin- 
son, Profes sor Tonning and ot hers. 

Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 

Don't forget the grand masquerade on 
skates at the West End Parlor Skating 
rink Saturday night. Everybody should 
mask, as tliere are three good prizes to 
be given away. 

I am otfering a few good bargains in 
residence lots near where the flouring 
mills are to be built J. A. Bofjcs, 

35 Farguson Building. 

C!ommercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accurate and prompt attention at 
The Herald Job Rooms. 



Cut out this coupon, make your guess upon 
it and send it to Tlie Dally Herald. All guesses 
must be made on this coupon. Only one gueis 
allowed to a single coupon. In case there shall 
be two or more answers of the same nuinlier, 
which number is nearest or next to nearest 
that returned by the enumerators, then the 
winners shall lie. In either case, the ones whose 
coupons liear the earliest date. 

Aildress all answers to 

"(iUESs " care The Dally Herald. 
Duluth. Minn. 

.Vi«y Serve as a Guide. 

In order to give data that Is of interest and 
may be of value. The Herald reprints the fol- 
lowing from the directory report ol ItW, but 
it must be remembered that this paper does 
not vouch for the accuracy of the opinions set 
forth or the tlguros given : 

This volume contains :V*W more names than 
the last issue; a total of l(i,;ta) adult citizens of 
Duluth; this sum multiplied by 2X, the factor 
which has been found to truthfully represent 
the women anu children not included in th« 
list, Indlciilos a uopulation of ii>,VM for Du- 
luth, a gain of lO.MIU inhabitants within a ye.ir, 
and the prediction is ventured that If a lull, 
complete and accurate count be made 
perienccd and competent canvassers, 

,£lt 1UM> n.-...!.. n.tit 1... e^,.r.^l 



Sold by Drngglsts. or sent postpaid on receipt 
•f price. Dr. lIisirHREvs' Mantil, (144 pages) 
rlcfily bound In cloth and gold, mailed free. 
Humphreyw'. M edici iieCo.Uft' Fulton St. N Y. 

SPECIFICS. 




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GULLUM, 

Painless Dentist. 

Room 1-7, 4i>; West Superior Street, 
FarrusRon Hiock. • Dulutb 



ittt#M5^ 



A. FITGER & GO'S 

Lake Superior Brewery 

Is the largest In the State of MIc tesota ou «lde 
of the Twii Cltlei 



NEW HOTEL. 



-THl 




St. 



iiy ex- 
nearly 
t^rpo- 



(Vi.lKJi; souls will be found within the 
rate limits of Duluth In 1890. 

Population by Years. 

18M), United States census.. b.470 

188,'i, state census 18.0(10 

1886, directory estimate '5 ,000 

1H8T, directory estimate d(l,000 

1888, directory estimate 37,000 

1889, directory estimate 47,900 



R 



O 



T 



H 



E 



R 



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BROWN 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restaufants, 



-AND- 



TAKE NOTICE I 

We are agents for the celebrated 

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Cor. 



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W U. Barnes. Manager 



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Great French remedy. Dr. LeDuc's per- 
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th(jse are well located and very accessible. 
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i 




f 

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a 



ED," 




C^f^ISE BIEZB^ T .T), 



MEMBERS OF THE 



DDLDTH CLEARING HGHSE ASSOCIATION. 



Americgn Exchange Bank 
Bell &. Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bank 
State Bank of 
National Bank 
Marine Bank 



of Duluth 

Duluth 

of Commerce 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
100,000 

1 .000,000 
I 00,000 
100,000 
100,000 
260.000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

1 0,000 

1 00,000 

26,000 



■^-v 



R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 




i 



• 



Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty. atf'Good workmat- 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



209 East Siiperior Street, 



Duluth, Minn, 



40 




40 



-AT- 



P. V. DWYER & BROS. 

Telephone 179. 
t 

207 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Booms ilO. mi and SI 2, Duluth Union lational Bank Building 




>• <» - ■■ Ml^ ^ l 



»1 




{ 



-k- 





■■ 



liUJLUTH BV15J*rNG HERALD: JAIsTJABT 24, 1890. 



WOHLO OF COMMERCE 



The Course of Prices in a Dull 

Market on Duluth's 

Board. 



Large Shipments 
Much Coarse 



of Corn; 
Grain 



Expected Soon. 



Today's wheat prices were weak and 
lower, showing a big break. There were 
sellers in all American markets and the 
weakness here was mainly a retle<-tion 
of that at other places. No points of 
strength came in duWng the day. Cables 
were weak and exports small. 

Cash No. 1 hard was nominally i^ 
lower, closing at 7S, and January 1 hard 
at the same price. Cash and January 
No. 1 northern closed at 76, sellers. Cash 
No. '2 northern closed at 73, nominal. 
May opened at 8.3 14, nominal, with the 
first Side abjut noun at 8.% broke to 82:^^ 
where it closed. May No. 1 northern 
closed at SJ bid. February corn closed 
at :i94. May at SIJ^, both 'nominal. 




Th« I)Hily MoveuienU 

Cars on track: Wheat 36, corn 6, oats 4. 
Receipts: Wheat, 140 bu; oats, li:J2 bu. 
Shipments: Wheat, 113i> bu. Inspection: 
Wheat, No. 1 hard, 6 cars; No. I north- 
ern, 13; No. 2 northern, 2. Corn, 2. Oats, 
19. Inspection out: Corn, -45. Minne- 
apolis reported 1:53 cars against 152 
yesterday. Koceipts there: Wheat, 77,- 
144 bu. Shipments: Wheat, 14,500 bu; 
corn, 12,51t; bu. Exports from the sea- 
board: Wheat, 31,108 bu; Hour, 67,140 
bbls. 

HatohinoonV Uoyn loo jtharp. 
Chicago, Jan. 24.— It is reported on 
the board of trade that the settling boys 
of Mr. Benjamin Peters Hutchinson, 
formerly Old Hutch, by a series of cross 
trades made to a certain broker, have 
swmdled him out of a very large sum of 
money. Mr. Hutchinson was not on the 
board this morning, but there apjiears 
to be no doubt that he has been made 
the victim of his boys. Nothing else 
was talked of this morning bv the 
"bulls." 



LAST NIG HT'S LECTURE. 

Bunllrk'* Teaip«<mnce L.ecture Ltut Nig^ht 
a Very Forcible EflTort. 

As usual the meeting was opened by 
singing by the choir. Rev. Mr. Noyes 
read portions of Scripture, which was 
followed by prayer by Kev. Mr. Hein of 
the German Methodist church. 

Mr. Burdick began by saying there 
are some very encouraging features in 
this movement, as we measure it by a 
score of years. To illustrate the per- 
manence of temperance movements he 
related his experience a few years since. 
All the better part of the community 
was engaged earnestly in the work. Of 
many drunkards who signed the pledge 
only five broke it. A Law 

and Order league was organized. 
The first man who violated 
the excise law was given thirty days' im- 
prisonment, he did the same thing and 
got six niuaths which resulted in his 
signing the pledge. You cannot save 
drunkards except through the church. 
Of several thousand who have reformed 
as the result of his work, and were not 
brought into the church, only five are 
sober. Where the church did not in- 
terest itself in the work the saloons are 
not closed. 

The way to get men to think is to get 
the truth before them. Dram shops are 
a continued drain on the young men of 
the country. Those who are selling 
liquor are doing it for the money they 
get from the yi>ung men. You, 
the (>eople, said he are 

to blame for the whole business. 
A mechanic at Wheeling, W. V'a., com- 
plained to the speaker that he could lay 
up nothing out of his liberal wages, but 
he was spending $412 yearly at and in 
connectit)n with the saloon. He stop 
ped that drain and now owns a house 
worth $10,000, and has money in the 
bank. The pathway of character never 
leads through the door of a saloon. 

He told of a boy in Rochester only 15 
years old, guilty of every vice on the 
decalogue l>ecause of liquor. He had no 
confidence in any temperance which is 
not based on Christianity. Had no con- 
tidence in any religion that did not »le- 
mand the utter destruction of the liquor 
traffic. 

Those who fail to hear Mr. Burdick 
miss an opportunity. 



RAIL NEWS. 



THE ROSE CROIX. 



.Sen. 



Chicitco Gossip. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of VV. VV. Bill, successor to 
Pressy, Wheeler i; Lewis: 

Caic^iio. Jan. 21. — Wheat, active, 
weak and lower. An etfort was made at 
the oi>ening to support the market, but 
the selling by several prominent houses 
soon tilled the demand from small 
traders, after which, bulling seemed im- 
possible. The news came of export pur- 
chases in New York amounting to thir- 
teen loads, and that sales of flour for 
South American and other points were 
unusually large, but even this failed to 
advance. Even on an oversold market 
the bulls lack the enthusiasm and 
courage necessary to force shorts to 
cover. Eighty cents for May wheat is 
low, and there are indications of good 
buying orders at that figure. From 8.Jc 
down there has been gtKxi buving at 
round figures, but if the market is forced 
into new ground, say below 80c, it may 
become verj- weak. 
Corn, inactive and lower. 
Provision, dull and lower. Packers 
were the principal sellers, the buying 
coming chiefly from houses having a 
countrj- trade. Indications favor some 
decline before any further advance. 



Om<ent Ia!trall«<l at L.A>t yighf» First 
»lon. 

Inspector General Adams of Minne- 
sota and Dr. F. Von Suessmilch of Dela- 
van. Wis., inspector general of the North- 
ern division conducted the ceremonies 
in the institution of Rose Croix council 
of Kadojh at Masonic hall last night. 
Officers were elected as follows: T. W^. 
Hugo, preceptt)r: Isaac E. West, first as- 
sistant: 8. L. Frazer, second assistant; 
J. R. Carey, chancellor; R. E. Denfeld, 
junior warden: C. H. Graves and N. A. 
Gearhart, orators; W. Van Brunt, al- 
moner; J. E. Cooley, recorder: S. Levy, 
treasurer; W. G. Tenbrook, master of 
ceremonies; J. W. Miller, tyler. 

Tlie branch of tae order as referred to 
in yesterday's Herald is a higher branch 
of Masonry than anything heretofore 
established in Duluth. The chapter 
here was founded by fifteen of the 
Thirty-second degree Masons here. The 
regular nights of meeting have not yet 
L»een arranged. Thursday, however, will 
probably be the evening chosen. The 
visitors, who comprised besides the in- 
spectors several from lodges outside, 
were tendered a banquet, which wan a 
highly enjoyable affair. 



PERSONAL. 



>'ew Tork .Stocks. 

The following are closing prices on the 
New York stock exchange as reported bv 
W. W. Bill jfc Co.: 

Today. 
Chlca^, Burlinjrton Jc Quincy. 107i» 



2S!4 
"of* 

5ti>4 

i- 

84'4 



Amenoau Cotton Oil. 

Missouri Pacific 

Northern Pacitlc preferred ... 
Chicaifo. -Milwaukee & St. Paul 

Sujrur Trust 

Gas Trust 

L t Nashville.". .'.".'. .'.'.'] 

*-" ■'•orthwestem lii^J 

f i s»; 

IjttKe auore — «^1U54 

Keadiuff 391^ 

Ten II. coal and iron 86^ 

Richmond Termioal 2i« 

Atch:~.in "" ggjjj 

y- : r.Acliawanna !!. ISTS 

^ "i *i;, 

iK-.*-. 1 . u.-l 2l\2 

Western ■ nlou ' fu? 

Union HiK-iflc ' " 67? 

Wisconsin Central aji 



Oil 



..lOBii 



Vester- 
day. 
107 

74i 

65'^, 

47 

>»h 
111 

961* 
lUo 

an'-., 

21 '8 

31"* 

ISH^i 

*iix 

85 
«7S 

106 



Mlnnejtpolis Close. 

MuTNiAPons. Jan . :it -CI. .ginar #iot*tlon.'. : 
«o. 1 hard, Jauuaiy, Ta; FeSusry. T«; 
May, K2: on track. T'j. No. f northern, 
January^ .bS: February. 76?*; May. TB'i; on 
iT^ ■ " ^^ S*°- - northern, January. 73- 
February, 73: May. 77: on trac -k, rmib 

Chicago Close. 

«£?'*^'^?*\ ■'?" ^' '='"^ P™- close.-Wheat 
flmi. Cash, .6 February. 76t.i; May, 80'. 
^'■o- e^y; January. 33!*; February, 29^; 



POLITICAL AFTERMATH. 



Mr. 



Bradley Declines to Run; Uemmrratic 
.41dertuaaicT Candidate. 

A new candidate for alderman has ap- 
peared in the Fourth ward, in the person 
of T. T. Hudson, of the law firm of 
Jacques & Hudson. Unless the repub- 
licans bestir themselves this republican 
city will present the novel sight of two 
democrats running against each other in 
the same ward, with no one to oppose 
them. Mr. Hudson will probably be 
the regular democratic nominee, while 
Robert Jjouden will run as independent 
democrat. 

Mr. A. W. Bradley requests The Her- 
ald to state that he formally declines to 
enter the contest and will not permit his 
name to be used in connection with the 
mayoralty. The contest, therefore, nar- 
rows down to a fight between M. J 
Davis and H. W. Pearson, should tbe 
former finally decide to enter the con- 
vention for its endorsement of his can- 
didacy. 

Informai Conventions. 

Politics absorb almost everything else 
today. Little knots of men are gathered 
on the street corners discussing the situ- 
ation. E.specially is this the case in the 
city hall. Several of the officers are for 
the time being transformed into informal 
political conventions. .\t the West End 
the excitement is greater than here. 



Col. and Mrs. Graves left last evening 
for a long visit to the East and South. 
They will be absent some time. 

Mr. Thomas Monahan, United States 
customs inspector, will leave in a few 
days for a trip to the British Itle. 

Rev. W. M. Barker of St. Pauls has 
just returned from a trip to the south- 
western part of the state, where he has 
been preaching a mission. 

United States Marshall W. M. Camp- 
bell was in Duluth last night to attend a 
whisky case before Commissioner Carey. 
Mr. W.W. Swett of Minneapolis, mana- 
ger of the Massachusetts Mutual Life 
Insurance company, was in the city yes- 
terday. 

Lawyer Frank B. Kellogg, of the St. 
Paul lirmof Davis, Kellogg & Severance, 
was in the city last evening. 

The new United States District At- 
torney Eugetfe Hay, came up last night 
and spent the evening in the city on 
business. 

Mr. Max Shapira and wife, Tower, are 
auests at the Merchants. 

Mr. H. Oldenburg and wife. Northern 
Pacific Junction, are guests at the St. 
Louis. 

Mr. M. Muller, president of the Citi- 
zens National bank of New Ulm, is at 
The Spalding. 

^ Col. E. L. Corning, brother of Erastus 
Corning, the New York financier and 
politician,is a guest at The Spalding. Mr. 
Corning has lived for several years in 
(xeneva, Switzerland, where he is edu 
eating his children and for which city 
he left Duluth today. He is heavily in- 
terested in the Iron Range road and the 
Vermilion range, and it is on business in 
connection with these that he visits Du- 
luth. He is also a friend of Vice-Presi- 
dent M. J. Carpenter and has been on 
the range this week. 

Mr. James A. Boggs left this morning 
for a business visit to Madison, Wis. 

Mr. E. T. Turner, manager of the 
Adams ELxpress office, is very low with 
pneumonia, and his recovery is considered 
doubtful. 



A Lower Lumber Rate; A MornluK Colli- 
sion ; Other Notes. 

In connection with the Wabash and 
the Kansas City roads the Omaha has 
issued a lumber tariff between Duluth 
and St. Louis of twenty-one cents per 
hundred, a cut of two cents under the 
tariff now in force. The new rate goes 
into effect the 27th. 

Another cut has been made on second 
class rates between St. Paul and Chi- 
cago by the Burlington & Northern, 
which claims to have proof that other 
roads are making a W rate. This re- 
duces the second-class fare from Duluth 
to Chicago via St. Paul to 88, this rate 
going into effect from here tomorrow. 

A collision occurred in the Union 
depot yards this morning that delayed 
traffic for several hours and necessitated 
trains to unload passengers several hun 
dred feet from the Union depot plat- 
forms. A switching train backing up 
from the West End collided with the 
Ashland mixed freight at the sidetrack 
junction. Two box cars of the switch 
train were thrown from the track and 
one side of a box car was smashed in. 
The track was blockaded from 8 until 
nearly noon. 

The New England roads have decided 
to recognize the cut rates between Chi- 
cago and Northwestern points. This 
has never been done before the Canadian 
Pacific become a competitor of the 
through lines. Heretofore the New 
England roails have never quoted rates 
further than Chicago. Now they will 
make rates on a basis of whatever rates 
the Chicago-St. Paul lines may adopt. 
The ^ew \ork trunk lines will probably 
follow the Uad of the New England 

The Burlington A- Northern has in- 
structed its agents to meet any rate 
from Chicago to Northwestern points 
quoted at scalpers" offices. Another re- 
duction will probably be made in St. 
Paul-Chicago rates, and the second-class 
fare between Duluth and Chicago via 
St. Paul may yet reach to. It is ex 
pected that the Wisconsin Central and 
Northern Pacific will make some changes 
in transcontinental rates before the 
month is out. 

The new Wagner buffet cars to be run 
in the service of the Zenith City Short 
line, will be ready for use the lUst of 
this month, and one of them will be sent 
to this city next Friday. 

IS A MI SDEM EANOR 

And the Police Department Has the Right 
to Clean »ildewalkii. 
.A. new way to deal with the snow ques 
tion has been found. If the council 
thinks it can make no legal direct legis- 
lation in this matter, there is another 
way this can be dealt with. The ac 
cumulation of snow upon the sidewalks 
clearly comes under the provisions of 
the ordinance regarding the ob- 
struction of streets, alleys and high- 
ways, and under this ordinance, 
with an amendment making the accumu- 
lation of snow an obstruction of the 
street, property owners can be prose- 
cuted. 

Several prominent lawyers have been 
seen on this subject, and they state as 
their positive opinion that the accumu- 
lation of snow upon a sidewalk makes a 
misdemeanor under the obstruction 
ordinance, and that property owners, 
under an amendment, could be made to 
clear their sidewalks or be liable to the 
city govern ment. . 

A Case of .Sun'ering. 
The Womans Relief corps unearthed a 



A Necktie, Alttiougti Kouf Bosom Companion, is Also a Tale 

Bearer of Kour Tastes. 

Please bear in mind that MONDAY, JAN. 27 
we will make prices sell one of the best assorted 
stocks of FINE NECKWEAR in the city 

Due notice will be given other lines 
to be sold proportionately low. 



les which are 



KILGORE & SIEWERT 

Fine Hats and Men's Furnishings. 

ST. LOUIS HOTEL BLOCK, DULUTH. 
Store closes at 6:30 P. M. 




LOANS MADE 



AT- 



6 AND 

MONEY ON 

JONES 



7 PER CENT. 

HA.Nr>— NO r)EL.A.Y. 



-:-&-:- B R A E 

Real Estate and Loans, 
409 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 



O 
O 

US 

a 
cc 
O 

O 

H 

co 

H 
Z 

< 
Q. 



CeWT SIICRIFICE SILE 



Will continue 
duced. Cost 



SIXTEENTH 



Semi-llniiual Red Figure Mark Down Sale ! 

You know that all our departments are affected by this Red 
Figure Mark Down Sale. Everything in winter wear is reduced 
all over the store. 

Especially are the prices cut to the lowest notch in our ever 
popular Boy's and Children's Clothing Department. Think 
of buying our best 

Boy's and Cliildfen's Oveicoats at Cost Pies. 




Fifteen Da} s— until stock is re- 
or worth cuts no figure. WE 

MUST REDUCE, even at a great loss 

Our low price; have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business ILxistence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides 
you would not slop to read them, but will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

$7.49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat 
worth at least $ 15. ' 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ I 8. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishing Good;. No reserve We must reduce 
our stock at least $^5,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mild weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us to take the loss. Call and 
our prices. 

M. S. B URROWSI& CO. 




see 



O 
O 

id 

QC 
UJ 

D 
CC 
O 

o 

(0 

D 
CO 





I 



PIONEffl FOEL CO., 



out what we have, 



It seems ridiculous, but we intend to close 
no matter how much we lose. 

FUR COATS, FUR-TRIMMED OVERCOATS FUR-LINED 
OVERCOATS and ULSTERS have been reduced to cost prkls 
all overcoats being closed out during this Red Figure Sale at 
much less than the actual value of the goods. 



WKATHER FORKCAST. 

Jan. 2 i. —Forecast for Duluth and 
vicinity for 24 hours cumviencina 10 a.m. 
today : War7ii€r ; light .^now. 

Observer, Signal Office. 



COAL 



CROSS CR[[K LEHIGH, 

FR[[ BORNINe, 

AIITHRIICIIE & BIIUMINOUS. 



REALTy SNAPS! 





'^/^i/mf 




Dry Maple, 
Hurd Mixed, 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



case of typhoid fever on Eighth avenue 
east, between Eighth and Ninth streets, 
today. The sufferer is a boy 17 years 
old. The boy lives with his father, a 
widower, who is somewhat eccentric and 
a radical woman hater. For this last 
reason he refuses to have any of the sex 
around his premises. As a consequence, 
the ladies claim, the boy does not have 
proper care, and no medical attendance 
had been procured. Poor Commissioner 
Paul made due investigation and found 
matters not so bad as represented, and 
Dr. Sherwin, the health officer, will see 
that proper care is taken of the sick boy. 



Arre»te«l fur .■Snowballlog. 
Four small boys. Week, Smith, Frank 
Bobol and Charley Williams, were up at 
p>olice court on the charge of assault in 
the third degree. Snowballing pedes- 
trians was the extent of their mis- 
demeanor, and after faithfully promising 
not to do so any more were let off. 
.■V.rchie McDonald, Frank Doran and 
John Stevenson were a trio of drunks 
committed for seven days each. .Judge 
Davis officiated on the bench. Judge 
Morris being indisposed. 

Considerable Wind Tomorrow. 

The outlook for tomorrow is not as 
tlattering as the present beautiful 
weather would indicate. At Swift Cur- 
rent and Winnipeg the wind is blowing 
at 3G miles, and at Huron and M<x)rhead 
IS miles an hour. The temperature has 
risen very rapidly, with a rapidly-falling 
barometer. Snow and wind may Ije 
looked for tomorrow morning, according 
to the weather observer. 

TELEGRAPH BRIEFS.. 



The Dulntli Millt & Produce Company. 

The consolidated wholesale milk Krms 
of R A. Peers <fe Co. and Bridgeman & 
Sinotte have purchased the popular busi- 
nees establishment of Gage, Holland, 
Hayden & Co., at Xo. 11 East Superior 
street, and hereafter will conduct that 
business in connection with their very 
extensive milk trade. The new ffrm are 
not strangers to this line of business and 
will conduct a strictly first class farm 
and dairy product .store, where the 
choicest butter, the freshest of eggs and 
cream can always be secured. The new 
firm starts out under favorable auspices '. 
and is bound to win success. The firm 
name will be the Duluth iJ ilk & Pro- 
duce company. 



Kesi^ter BeH.ime. 
At The Spalding: W. R. Sloane, 
Juluis Kessler. T. B. Kellogg. W. N. 
Campbell, C. H. Brooks, St. Paul; T 
Libby, P. E. Tarbel, Minneapolis; J. C 
Tootman Levi M. Mayer, A. J. Spring, 
)) ;-'-^^^brook, A. Sosenblatt, Chicago; 
L. D. HoUenbeck. Racine; C. S. Guild, 
Buffalo; Franklin E. Worcester, New 
York. 

At the St. Louis: A. R. Green, St. 
Paul; C. R. Rii-h, Buffalo; C. W. Crys- 
dale, W. A. Sherman, Chicago; W F 
Smith, C. Collins, C. C. Baker, Minne^ 
apolis. 

At the Merchants: C. L. Cass, Min- 
neapolis; J. H. Preston, H. J. Manhart, 
St.Pal;W. A. Doerr,Two Harbors 
A. Lrslander, Mahtowa; A. C. Wood- 
cock. Detroit; G. Grant, Ely. 

iMr. C. C. Jones of Minneapolis is a 
guest of Judge Ensign. Mr. Jonee was 
an old resident of Duluth. 

Mr. John Gordon, Jr., of Chicago, is 
staying for a few days with Judge En- 
sign. 

Mayor W. N. Shephard of Tower re- 
turned home this afternoon. 

If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. F^Jot & Co.'s ad. 



The occupants of a three-story brick 
building, Brooklyn, had a very narrow 
escape from death. Some workmen in 
digging a cellar so undermined it that 
It came down with a crash. Fortunately 
the occupants had warning enough to 
get out, with the exception of a 5-year- 
old boy named Harry Ford. 

(Jeorge M. Smith of Mille Lac county, 
is in jail at St. Paul on the charge of 
forging pension and back pay rolls. 
Smith got a letter containing the check, 
and forging Gould's name, drew the 
money from the bank of Princeton. 
Smith is over 70 years old. 

The Union Pacific is again blocked. 
Trains going west are blocked at Green 
River, and those coming east at Pendle- 
ton. 

There has been an explosion of pow- 
der near Charlotte, N. C , where blasting 
is going on for a railroad. A great quan- 
tity of rock was thrown up by a prema- 
ture blast and fell upon a number of 
workmen. Many were injured and Hve 
were killed. 

How .St, Fanl Does It. 

Pioneer Press: The city street force 
will commence this afternoon to clean 
snow and ice from the sidewalks in the 
principal streets where the work has not 
already l)een done by the property 
owners. Under an amendment to the 
city charter made by the legislature of 
1887, if owners do not clean their walks 
within twent-four hours after the fall of 
snow or formation of the ice, the city 
engineer is required to do so and return 
a sworn statement of the cost to the 
county auditor, who will collect from the 
property frontage in the same manner as 
other assessments are collected. 



CITY BRIEFS. 

Every street corner has been occupied 
today with groups of citizens discussing 
politics. 

It is said that several labor organiz- 
ations have urged M. S. Burrows to run 
in the Fourth ward for alderman. 
' S. Rohbins & Son, the Chicago firm 
that built Temple Opera stage, has bid 
on the construction of the Car works 
cottages. 

A lot on Superior street in block 12 
was sold recently to J. D. Howard A Co. 
A large three-story brick store will be 
erected on the land this spring, to be 
used for wholesale purposes. 

Tom McLaughlin, Jr., a 1.3-year-old 
«)n of Police Captain McLaughlin, is in 
St. Paul where he has been summoned 
as an important witness before the U. S. 
circuit court in the appealed case of 
Walsh v.s. Wolf & Truax. 

The Rev. J. S. David of Minneapolis 
will lecture at the Lakeside hotel. Les- 
ter Park, this evening at 7:30, on the 
question of "Probation and Progress 
After Death." It is free to all. Ques- 
tions will l)e invited from the audience. 
The Stenson building is to be lighted 
throughout with incandescent electric 
light. 

Mrs. J. H. Smith, president of the 
Womans Home society, called a special 
meeting of the directors of the society, 
which WHS held this afternoon. 

The committee appointed by the 
Chanaber of Commerce to investigate 
the charges of discrimination against 
the contractor on the Chamber of Com- 
merce building held a meeting yesterday 
afternoon. The committee of the Ameri- 
can Federation of Labor asked further 
time. Saturday afternoon a meeting 
will be held. ** 

J. B. Perkins and W. J. McMartin, 
late of Superior, will soon begin to pub- 
hsh in Duluth The Lake Superior 
Catholic, a denominational newspaper. 

A saloon keeper named Redull was 
before Court Commissioner Carey last 
night for selling whisky to Indians. He 
waived examination, and was held to the 
United States district court at Winona 
1 ^hisafternwn J. Pilkey, for the Du- 
luth Music company, placed two fine 
pianos in Temple Opera house for the 
use of the Mozarts tonight. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office, Hotel St. Louis: 12 m 
above; 3 p. m., 8' above; 6 p. m., e' 



REA L ESTA TE. 

.4 Record of the Real- Kstate Trangfent for 

34 Hours Kndlng: at ^oon. 
T E Bowen to M Mullen, blk I4o, Third 
* iMng to K Ke«-n. 1 3, blk 70. Oneota 
F \V t^mith to W 8 Moore, I 14, blk«5, 

ElKilOll 

W McKiiiley to E Leland, 

D, Mineral add.. . 
Sanio to M (.Olville, 1 11) and 

same. 
Same to E M Law, I 17 and 18. blk '6. 

same 

L Sinotte to H W Blai». 1 ' 

Harringtous add. 
I) Haijiiah to M 

I ondoii add 

C E Itiekerinaii to J D 

blk.'., Wost End add. 
John Kudd toC H 

T-uI-U. 
w 




CONNELLSVILLE 
And GAS HOUSE 



OBDERS PeOMPTLy 0[LI¥EB[0 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



NO SUCH 



BARGAINS 



I 



7 



. 1 21, blk «, W 

ijuiblkii' 

I 17 

rand 8, blk 10^ 

Fleischman, 1 islblksi, 

Keekie, 1 8 anil 9^ 

Clagrue, sw!* otaehi, 

^ Holgute toij' J "irpham.'TO!*" of 

Jj; T James t4) J H Jaine8.'l'8,"bl'k 19, JEly 
W T Jainos to J H James, I T. blk 19. 

li ly 

J J Mcnimer to E Sedarwick. 1 13. 14 23 

and H. blk -A). Bay A'lew add . . ' 

,^- V'W.'"'^ ^ " Shryer. 114, blk 

11., tr 1 iVi and 57, blk aw. Thl-Tl 
^ ?."/i"*"'' }P ^ O Hall. 1 15 and 16. blk 

Uf. London add 

E Batcliuui to M Maher. one acre in sH 

of ne'4 of svr^, 5-49-14 
'^ ■i'^ S,':"^} -^ >^ ^ Clayton,"! 66,«8, "to; 

brkmT.iin,.':'."."^"''''''^*^'^*- 
C E Fi-ay to M Maher, und H of i 'acre 

8!4of ne!4of swv^, ft.4!».14 

in-'u^is" '" ^ I^'iurivage. nwj* evi^, 

*';} is-rf-'i^''®^ *° "^ ^ ^"**'* " ^ *»^ °'^'*' 

J"u"<lato 6 ProvtwtynwJi'of'se^t.'l"*- 



I 9,000 
L9U0 

-MOO 
100 

a» 

300 

1,200 

750 

760 

3U0 

5,000 
1,600 

600 

830 

1,700 

1,600 



4,100 
35 

1.800 
10 

1,800 

1,000 



Office: Hotel St. Loois, 326 W. Superior St. 

YARD: 

Superior Street and I 
Third ave. east. | 



DOCK: 

Qarfield Avenur 
Rice* Point. 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Northern Pacific Short Line. 

DITLUTH TO BUPKRIOR. 



Leave 
Duluth 



Except Sunday. 
Exeept Sunday. .. 
Except Sunday. ., 

Daily 

Dally 

Except Sunday... 

Daily 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday. . . 

Dally 

Daily 

Dally 

Except Sunday. ■■ 



Leave 
W. Sup'r 



6 30 am 

7 35 aon' 

8 66 am 
10 00 am 
1135 am 

110 pm 
3 15 pm 
3 3opm 

3 30 pm 

4 00 pm 
4 35 pm 
6 40 pm 

6 46 pm 

7 15 pm 

9 25 pm 
11 10 pm 



Arrive 
Superior 



6 46 am 

7 65 am 
9 10 am 

10 15 am 

11 50 am 
138 pm 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 45 pm 

4 16 pm 

4 60 pm 

5 65 pm 
7 00 pm 
7 30 pm 
9 46 pm 

1127pm| 116.3 pm 



6 62 am 

8 02 am 

9 17 am 

10 22 am 

11 57 am 

1 M pm 

2 37 pm 

3 47 pm 

4 25 pm 
4 57 pm 

6 02 pm 

7 07 pm 




Are to be found among 

uth Real Estate Men 



i 



BUPKRIOR TO DtniUTH. 



3> trauslora; consideration *3(i,340 



THE 

MOZART SOIREE 



I Leave i Leave 
ISuperior W. Sup'r 



above; 10 p. m., ; t a. m.. 7 
be ow; 9 a. m., 7' below; 12 m., 2 
below. Maximum, 7 above. Mini- 
mum, 7 below. Daily range, 14^ 

The i>oetoffice issues a neat "etate- 
™«°t of business" at Duluth during 
1^9. It shows the business of the post- 
office and gives some other valuable in- 
fonnation relative to the local office. 
. The Herald must again announce that 
it will, under no circumstances, piint 
anonymous communication s. 

PERSONAL-PROPERTY 
Hu»t be Paid 



TAX 
now and March 1 



The fifth soiree musicale of 
the Mozart Association of Du- 
luth will be held in the Temple 
Opera house on Friday even- 
ing, 24th inst., at 8 o'clock. 

Admittance on membership 
cards, which must be shown 
at the door, A limited num- 
ber of tickets will be sold to 
persons not members at $ I 
each. Said tickets, which ad- 
mit only one person, can be 
had at Dyer's Music store and 
at the door. 

The program for this musi- 
cale will be made up entirely of 
home talent and by our best 
musicians, including Miss 
French, Madame Beauleau, 
H. P. Robinson, Prof. Ton- 
ning and others. 



Dally 

Except Sunday... 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 
Except Sunday... 

Dally 

Dally 

Dallv 

Except Sunday... 

DaUy 

Dally 

Dally 

Daily 

Except Sunday. .. 

Daily 

Except Sunday.. 



*00 am 

"s'id am 
9 25 am 
10 46 am 
1106 am 
13 36 pm 

1 46 pm 

2 50 pm 
4 06 pm 

6 05 pm 

'e'ldpm 

7 30pm| 
1146 pm 



6 46 am 

7 07 am 
7 40 am 
817 am 
9 32 am 

10 66 am 

11 16 am 

13 42 pm 

1 52 pm 

3 00 pm 

4 16 pm 
613 pm 
610 pm 

6 17 pm 

7 30 pm 
1162 pm 



Arrive 
Duluth 

7 05 am 
7 23 am 

7 66 am 

8 36 am 

9 48 am 
11 10 am 
11 3i) am 

100 pm 

2 07 pm 

3 16 pm 

4 30 pm 
6 30 pm 
6 26 pm 

6 35 pm 

7 45 pn. 
1210 am 



ACREUCE - IN - WEST - 




-AND THE- 



St. Paal « Duluth Railroad. 




Leave Duluth... 
Arrive St. Paul.. 
Ar Minneapolis.. 

Ar Stillwater 

Ar Milwaukee 

Ar Chicago 

ArSt. Louis 

Ar Kansas City... 



EAST -:- END. 



8 00 am 
3 30 pm 
3 66 pm 

3 30 pm 

4 16 am 
TCOam 
6 05 pm 
4 46 pm 



210 pm 
6|55pm 
7 20 pm 
7 06 pm 
6 46 am 
9 30 am 
6 05 pm 
446pm 



10 00 pm 

6 66 am 

7 15 am 
7 00 am 

t7 06pm 
^ 00 pm 
am 
i 45 am 



+Kxcept Sunday— to other points dally. 



Highest of aU in Leavening Power.— U. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 1889. 



Notice the new bargains offered 
M. Root & Co.'s a<J. 



in J. 



Indian river oranges at Victor Huofa. 

Umtarion literature furnished free 
upon application at Koom D, Hunter 
block. 




Baking 
Pomler 



Itetweeu 
Next 

County Treasurer Johnson has issued 
about .3tX)0 postal-card notices to personal 
property ta.xpayers, notifying them of 
the fact that their taxes are now due 
ihese cards differ from any heretofore 
issued in several points, chief of which is 
that they give the valuation as well as 
tax. The treasurer wants it understood 
that the notice is not required by law 
and that a failure to receive it will ex- 
empt no one from the penalty and costs ' 
of nonpayment. | 

On Marjh 1 a penalty of 10 per cent is 
added to the tax if remaining unpaid. I 
If unpaid a. month later. Aprir 1, the tax ' 
will be putintiie hands of the sheriff! 
for legal collection by due process of law I 
costs added. The total amount 



RICH'D F. 



MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

i N S U 



Duluth, daily, 
iws: 
nion depot for Tower 

SlOpm 



— AND— 



Rooms I 



RANGE 

2, Exchange Bldg. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



with 



j of tax is on a personal valu ition of 
of *),45!),1(54. 



1889 



ABSOLUTEiy PURE 



Charles A. (xolden, the barber of 348 
U-ike avenue, has sold today to Otto E 
Sengobueeh of L'Anse, Mich., for the 
consideration of ?!•>«). Mr. < Golden will 
leave on Sunday evening for Seattle, 
Washington state. May success follow 
him. Give the new barber a trial. 



St. Paul & Duluth Short Line. 

Duluth to West 

Superior •635+800 8 46 MO 30 •» 00 am 

Duluth to West 

Superior •2 40 445 •+5 30 •660*+10 00Dm 

West Superior 

to Duluth +»6 10 •7 56 9 .30^+10 16 "11 16 am 

West SuiHjrior 

to Duluth 'S 00 +240 3 50 'e 46 ne 10 "9 10 Dm 

'Daily. +\Vogt Duluth only 

lAMive Duluth dally for Spirit Lake-9:0U am 
.^jiOpm; returning at 10:U5 am and pm. 



Duluth tt Iron Range Railroad. 

Commencing Dec. 16, 1889, Duluth & ;iron 
Kauge railroad passenger trains will arrive 
and depart from Union depot - ■ 
Sundays excepted, as follows 
No. 1, leave -*■ - 

and Ely 

No. 2. arrive Union depot from Toirer 

22^ .Wv.- ; 1302am 

tTelght trains arrive and depart from En- 
dion station as follows: 

N0.3, leave Kndion 960am 

No.4.arrlve Endion 606 pm 

SUBURBAN TBAIN8— OOINQ NORTH 

Daily except Sundays. 

^?.7?.^.'*i9°„ Depot— 6:60, 7:45, 8:40, 9:36 a. 
m.; 12:16, 1:46, 2:45, 4:10, 6:05, 6:10. 8:06,10.00, 
11:20 p. m. 

,o^.H'^2*i'.*r*i?^ '«*^'«' Union depot 9:30, a. m.. 
12:36. 2:00,3:20,6:30, 6:30.8:16 p.m. 

aoiNG soura. 

Dally except Sundays. 

I*ave Lester Park— 6:30, 7:30, 8:16, 9:10 and 
*°=i•^^.S?•= 1=1". 2:15, 3:40, 4:35,5:36, 7:40. 8:36 
and 10:J0 p. m. 

„ ^„"'"'*?' trains leave Lester Park 10 a. m.. 1:06 
2:60. 5:00. 6:00 and 7:46 - 



Lots 



West 



That are unheard of bargains. 





Util 





Chicago, St. 



Paul, Minneapolis 
Railwar. 



Omaha 



iBx Sunday 



Duluth,|Honth Shore and Atlantic. 

LeavcsDuluth dailv 930pir 

Arilvw l(i»piil)''c. Mich '. 8 37 am 

Arrives l»hp«. ulug, Mich 725am 

Arrives Nogaunoc, .Mich 736am 

Arrives Miirtiuolte. Mich 806am 

Ai rlvos .Sault .Sic. Marie, Mich 1 36 1,111 

Arrives Ottawa. Out 1146am 

Arrives Montreal, Quo ..330pm 

.■Vrrives IJoston, Miuss 8aOam 

AirlvesNow York. N. V 7 00am 

Arrives Detroit. Miuh lllUam 



Leave Duluth ' 1046 am 

Leave West Superior. . . U 10 am 

Loave Sufwrior 

Arrive Stillwater 

Arrive St. Paul 

Arrive Minneapolis. . . 



1180 am 
6 33 pm 

eoopm 

6 40 pm 



Dally. 



10 00 pm 
I0 3&pm 
10 36 pm 
7 Oj am 

6 55 am 

7 35 am 



That cannot be excelled by any agent in 

the city. 



ADDRESS 



Leave Duluth , 

Leave West Superior. . . 

Leave Superior 

Arrive Chippewa I'alls. 

Arrive Eau Claire 

Arrive Madison 

Arrive Mi Iwaukee 

Arrive Chicago 



Chicago lo- 
iiraally 



10 46 am 

11 10 am 
11 30 am 

5 10 pm 
5 50 pm 
1 39 am 
7 40 am 
7 00 am 




^-:v 



Trains arrive at Duluth. Dally 

From Eau Claire, and Chloam) 636pm 

From St.Paul and MlnueapollB.7 00am & 626 pm 
Oborqk M. Smith, Oan'l Airt.. 




ai^i 






«••»— aii> » 



■I 




DULUTH EVENING HERALD? 



A large list of Endion division 
lots cheap. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 W. Superior 8tr«et. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILDING. 



DULUTH. MIXN.. 8ATUEDAY, JAXUABT as, 1890— SIX ^AGES. 




Ill THE RIGHI DIRECTIOII AND YOU WILL MAKE MONEY. 



LIST [OIT 





m HAVE THEM TO SELL! 



HERE IS A SAMPLE I 

Southwest quarter of northwest quarter Section 
18-50-14, $130 per acre. Land within 1-4 
mile sold about 6 months ago for $225 per 
acre and held now at $300 per acre. The 
building of the Incline Railroad by the High- 
land Improvement Co. will make this land 
worth $200 per acre. 



eEPOBLICANS NOMINATE 



Martin O. Hall Nominated 
the Republicans in Con- 
vention. 



by 



It 



is a Close, Short Struggle 
Between Him and H. 
W. Pearson. 



•^-^ 



Southeast 
acre. 
14-50- 



HERE'S ANOTHER. 

quarter Section 15-50-15 at $40 per 
Acres in Northeast quarter Section 
I 5 just sold for $65 per acre. 



Also the Candidates for Alder- 
men in the Various 
Wards. 



i4-4p< 



u 



SOME SPECIAL BARGAINS IN LOTS IN 
LUTH PROPER. CALL OR WRITE. 




MONEY TO LOAN! 

MORTGAGES BOUGHT! 

NO DELAY— MONEY ON HAND I 



Applications wanted at once, especially for 
$500, $800, $ I 000, $ I 500, $2000, $2400. 



Stryker, Manley & Buck. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



Apples! Apples! Apples 



■ 



The republican city convention was 
called to order in the council chamber 
at 2 o'clock by Chairman M. <). Hall and 
the forty-two delegates were seated in- 
side the railing, an excellent arrange- 
ment, which prevented interference 
from outside. There was a- large at- 
tendance, the room being packed. 
Conspicuous by their presence were 
aspirants for the mayoralty and all the 
aldermanic candidates were there. 

Harrj' Armstrong nominated H. C. 
Helm as temporary chairman, who was 
duly elected and took his seat. Mr. 
Helm said it was a surprise, but he 
D U - would do his best. I. P. Beck was elected 
temporarj- secretary. One mem- 
ber from each ward was appointed 
as cretlential committee oy the chair as 
follows: J. B. Cotton, chairman. Third 
ward; C. A. Duncan, Fourth ward; \\\ 
S. McKay. Fifth ward; O. T. Neil, 
Second ward; S. M. Lester. Sixth ward; 
Chas. Archer, First ward. 

While the jcommittee on credentials 
were deliberating, the audience resolved 
itself into an independent convention, 
and the relative merits of the respective 
candidates were freely discussed. The 
meeting was an extremely orderly one. 
however, and the best of feeling pre- 
vailed. It was emphatically a Pearson 
convention, though Hall and Davis' sup- 
porters were not wanting. The labor 
element was conspicuou.i by its absence, 
those present consisting principally of 
business men. The county and city 
ollioers were also pretty well represented. 
The temporary committee on organ- 
ization was made the permanent one. A 
committee of three was appointed by 
the chair as follows: J. B. Cotton, Dr. 
Magie and D. A. Fraser. The commit- 
tee on credentials reported the delegates 
as elected last night, which report was 
duly adopted. 

Delegates from the First ward named 
as candidates for aldermen, Jas. Ding- 
wall and Chas. Beattie. Second ward 
men namv 1 1). J. Sinclair. The Third 
ward named Geo. F. Ash. The Fourth 
ward. T. W. Hugo. The Fifth ward, C. 
O. Nelson. The Sixth ward, S. A. Si- 
verts and the nominations were ratified 
by the convention by acclamation. A 
committee of one from each ward will 
be appointed. 



IN CLAIRVOY ANT'S CLUTCHES. 

The Toledo For»rery l'u<%e of "Madame l)e- 
vere" and a CaHhIer. 

Toledo, Jan. 25.— The preliminary 
heariiig^of Madame Devere, the clair- 
voyant, <uid Joseph Lamb, charged with 
uttering forged notes, occupied the po- 
lice court all day. Popular interest cen- 
tered around the connection of Richard 
Brown, a wealthy iron master of Voungs- 
town, whose name, it is charged, is forged 
to the notes. Mr. Brown's evidence was 
sweeping and entirely convincing. He 
was shown the forged notes, the bodies 
of which were admitted by the defense 
to be in Lamb's handwriting, and swore 
positively that ho did not sign them; 
that he never had any financial transac- 
tions with either Lamb or Madame De- 
vere; that he never heard of them, to his 
knowledge, till the present caaecameup; 
and that he does not know any Florida 
(}. Blythe. 

It wdl be remembered that this is 

what Madame Devere declared to Lamb 

and the bank ofticers to be her true 

name. The trial developed this woman's 

true name, through the testimony of a 

man named Burt of Woodstock, Ont. 

He said her family resided for years near 

him in that city, and that her mother 

still lives there; that her mp.iden name 

was Rigley and that she married a man 

named Hoover, which is her true naii?e. 

Both Devere and Lamb were bound 

over to the grand jury's action, Lamb's 

bail being Hxed at *8U0 and Devere's at 

$1000. 



FBOM WEST DULUTH, 



What the Good People of West 

Ouluth are Doing 

These Days. 



PBICB THK:EE CilN xa 



General Business and Personal 

News of a Single 

Day. 



WAR IN LABOR RANKS. 

The /t mei ioan Federulion and KnifjhU of 
Labor at War with Kach Other. 

Nkw Yohk, Jan. 25.— The tight between 
the American Federation of Labor and 



James S. Henell has arrived from 
Iluntington, W. Va.,to work in the oHioe 
of the Minnesota Car works. John 
Reardon. foreman of the foundry at the 
Iron Bay works, received a severe cut 
yesterday while suj>erintending a force 
of men in the yard. He fell upon a 
sharp stake -vhich penetrated his face 
near the right eye, cutting a severe 
gash. 

-\. (i. Rand, late proprietor of the 
.' hil]i})8 house, will in the future give 
HIS full time and attention to his real 
estate business. 

Mra Coon, wife of the superintendent 
at the West Duluth Manufacturing 
company's works, is expected to return 
today from her visit to the northern 
part of the state. 

II. P. Smith, cashier of the Manufactu- 
rers bank, recei»ed a letter yesterday 
from a New York gentleman signifying 
his desire to take stock to the amount 



AN IMPOR TANT MEETING. 
A Kiiilu-ay Meeting of Importance to Du- 
luth in New York. 
A railroad meeting, the result of which 
is very important to this city, is now 
being held in New York. Represent- 
atives of the Eastern and Western rail- 
ways and the Canadian and American 
lake lines are in conference over the 
adjustment of lake and rail rates for 
next summer. The American roads are 
anxious to avoid a repitition of the de- 
moralization that prevailed in rates last 
summer in consequence of lake and 
Canadian Pacific competition. The 
roads are trying to establish a basis of 
rates that will not shut out the via 
Chicago lines from participating in 
Northwestern business. 

It ia probable that Duluth will be 
given the same cdoap rates as last year, 
and that this conference will come to 
naught. President Hill of the Mani- 
toba has long maintained that all North- 
western freight should come via Du- 
luth, and to hold this position he will 
make the same rate via Duluth that ap- 
plies to Chicago as he did last year. And 
such a rate simply means that Chicago 
will lose aU that immense amount of 
freight that used to pass through her en 
route to the Northwest, while in winter 
the Northern route via the South Shore, 
Soo and Canadian Pacific lines has taken 
away the freight that once paid tribute 
to that city. 



iSATHOeilTOCOMSTOCK 



The Lind Office Muddle Keeps 

Mr. Comstock In Hot 

Water. 



NELLIE GETS 
Nellie BIy Arrives 



THERE. 
Vork 



at 4 



in New 
O'clock Today. 

New York, Jan. 25, 4 p. m.— The 
train with Nellie Bly has just arrived. 
Cannons were fired in Batterj- Park and 
at Fort Greene park in honor of the 
event. 



The Tariff Bill in Prepara- 
tion; That Silver Ques- 
tion. 



i;.j<^ -iiuoiitrtu X eueiatiuu ui uaoor anu r»f «10iw-i ;„ ti 1-1 : -iT , 

the Knights of Liibor, which has been T^IK fV„ f 1 .^h^Il H"^ "^^^^^^ 

slumbering for some time, threatens to new t^mnrtZ , r , p/!r ^t'''" ^ 

break out again in a few days. If it "^^l^'P^e^o'- "^ t>'«l'JnHips house, i 

does it. will l««hntfi<» t-^ fi,A...„K r„: r'^®^ last evening from their form 



does it will be a battle to the finish, for 
the question as to which of these two 
powerful organizations shall enjoy the 
supremacy will be definitely decided. 

Grounds for a renewal of the conflict 
have been found in the non-union condi- 
tion of the men employed in the lager 
brewing business. The Knights fought 
the Federation successfully in 1888, at 
the time when the big boycott was 
placed on the breweries, and now, as 
then, the Knights are taking the side of 
the big boss brewers, who were and are 
fiercely attacked by the Federation. 

So well known to the brewers is the 
conservative sympathy of Powderley's 
henchmen that every facility is given 
them in inducing the brewery employes 
to enter the ranks of that organization, 
while the Federation of Labor, which 
has as its alley the Central L;ib<jr union, 
is barred out. Several cases of this dis- 
crimination, one in a New York and 
another in Brooklyn breweries, have oc- 
curred of late, and hence the Federation 
has again taken to the war path. 

One result of this condition of affairs 
is that labor will not enter into the field 
on the eight-hour question with united 
ranks next May, and hence the agitation 
will be divested of much of the formi- 
dable power that had been anticipated. 
All over the countrj- the word has gone 
out from the Federation, "Anything to 
beat the Knights," and the battle will 
soon commence in earnest. 



the 

ar- 

former 



CHANGED TO RAIN. 



The 



FANCY SELECTED STOCK. 



1 II iL II I 



ea_ 



B[llEFlOW[fiS, SPITZ[|ieURGS, 




mi. 






LS 10 SELECT 



ALL IN FIRST-CLASS CONDITION. 




CALL AND ORDER A BARREL, AS PRICES WILL SHORTLY 

BE MUCH HIGHER. 




Present Prices, 13.25 to $3.?li Per earrel. 



SIMON CLARK, 

Metropolitan Grocery Store, 
I 13 WEST SUPERIOR STREET, DULUTH. 



The committee on resolutions present- 
ed the following; 

iVhereas, It has been the policy of 
the city government in the jjast to let 
contracts in such large jobs that it has 
been impossible for our resident con- 
tractors successfully to compete for such 
work, or, in case of their success, to give 
the large bond tnat is required, and 
thereby precluding them from doing city 
work and allowing outsiders to 
come in and do all our work to the detri- 
ment of our home laborers, therefore be 
it Resolved, that it is the sense of this 
convention that city work be let in small 
jobs, and be done by men of the city, 
thereby making it possible for home con- 
tractors to compete successfully f(3r such 
work, and secure to the laboring popula- 
tion of our city all benefits to be derived 
therefrom. 

Candidates for mayor were next nom- 
inated. H. C. Kendall in an eloquent 
speech nominated H. W. Pearson as one 
who represents no "gang," a representa- 
tive republican and who would represent 
the city of Duluth in a manner 
that would do credit to 

himself and the city. No 
further nominations being made at this 
time, an informal ballot for candidates for 
mayor was then taken. H. C. Kendall and 
Harry Armstrong were appointed tellers. 
The first ballot resulted as follows: H. 
W. Pearson, 18; M. J. Davis, 12; M. O. 
Hall, 9; C. H. Graves, 1; Geo. Rupley, 1; 
R. S. Munger, 1. Formal balloting was 
then pro<?eeded with. The first ballot 
resulted: H. W. Pearson, 18; M. O. 
Hall, IG; M. J. Davis, G; Geo. Rupley, 1. 
The Davis delegates at this point 
threw their strength in favor of Hall, 
which brought him into uncomfortable 
pro.ximity to Pearson and the second 
ballot was taken which resulted: H. W. 
Pearson, 21; M. O. Hall, 20; Geo. Rupley, 1. 
Twenty-two being necessarj- to a 
choice, another ballot was taken, wh ich 
resulted: H. W. Pearson, 19; M. O. 
Hall, 22; A. W. Bradley, 1. M. O. Hall 
was declared the nominee of the conven- 
tion. 

The nomination of Hall was a com- 
plete surprise, and created considerable 
excitement and confusion. .Vs was per- 
haps quite natural there was some dis- 
satisfaction expressed by outsideers as 
well as among delegates who had sup- 
ported the other men, at the result of 
the ballotting, though of course Hall's 
supporters were jubilant at the outcome 



Mountain Snou» now Threittpn n 
Deluife; KaiHing: the Hlorkafle. 

S.\N Fkajjclsco, Jan. 2.5.— Telegraphic 
advices to the Associated Press from 
thirty or more points in northern Cali- 
fornia states that heavy, warm rains 
have been falling since yesterday, that 
the snow is melting rapidly and that 
creeks and rivers are running almost to 
the top of their banks. A flood greater 
than that of a few weeks sinc« is threat- 
ened. The danger is greatest in the 
Sacramento, Napa and Sonoma valleys. 

Haloing: the Hloekude. 

Trickee, Cal , Jan. 2.3.^It is raining 
hard here now. This will melt the snow 
and make the work of raising the great 
snow blockade easier. 



Some Happy PaHxengent. 

SACRAME.NTO, Cal., Jan. 25.— The west- 
bound overland passenger train on the 
Central Pacific route, which has been 
blocaded in the Sierras between Emi- 
grant Gap and Sacramento since Jan. 17, 
has been released at last and passed 
through here from Colfax this morning 
en route to San Francisco. 



Is Prohabl.v True. 
Washingto.v, Jan. 25.— The impression 
18 gaining ground in the treasury de- 
partment that the report of the intention 
of the Bank of England to buy silver 
bullion and is ue circulating certificates 
is true. An official who has an intimate 
acquaintance with the financial affairs of 
the world said to a reporter this morning 
that in his estimation there was but 
little doubt of the fact If this should 
be done, he added, it would be a good 
thing for the American financial market, 
stimulating prices, and encouraging large 
movements of silver. There is a large 
tendency away from the established 
bullion producing fields towards Africa 
as a market for the world's supply, and 
he predicted that before many years the 
African mines would be the richest of 
all. 

John .MoHt iu Jail AKain. 
New York, Jan. 25.— Herr John Most, 
the anarchist whose conviction and sent- 
ence to one year in the penitentiary was 
affirmed yesterday by the general term 
of the supreme court, was arrested to- 
day. He was captured as he was leav- 
ing the house of Mrs. Ida Hoffman, who 
was on his bond, pending the decision of 
the general term. He expects his coun- 
sel to obtain a further stay of proceed- 
ings and another release on bail while 
his case is carried to the court of appeals. 
Most was convicted of using language 
tending to incite a not while making a 
speech at a meeting of anarchists held 
in November, 1887, to denounce the 
hanging of the Chicago anarchists. 

Motion for New Trial. 

Cmc.voo, Jan. 25. -The motion for a 
new trial in the case of James J. West, 
formerly publisher and editor of The 
Chicago Times, and who was convicted, 
shortly before Christmas, on the charge 
of illegally over-issuing the capital stock 
of that corporation and sentenced to five 
years in Joliet i>enitentiary, is on the 
docket for argument in Judge Grinnell's 
court totlay. A verj- general feeling 
prevails that the sentence was excessive, 
and it is thought that a new trial will 
be granted. 



last evening from 
home at Glencoe, Minn 

Prof. Stamm held the first of the 
series of socials for his dancing class last 
evening. A good number was present 
and all appeared to thoroughly enjov 
themselves. 

Robert Crombie, Dr. Jameson and Pat 
Haley attended the ball iu honor of the 
Burns anniversary last evening. 

The West Duluth banks will constili- 
date as a national bank as sotm as the 
necessary papers return from Washine- 
ton. 

N. H. Nyhus returned yesterday from 
a two weeks' trip to touthern Minnesota. 
A pleasant party was given by the 
Misses Sawyer to their many friends hist 
evening. A number of young peo])le 
from Duluth came down to attend the 
party. 

Professor Irwin of the Oneota schools, 
and family, are having a hard wrestle 
with the grip. He was the first taken 
down and obliged to be temporarily ab- 
sent from school duties. Now at the 
IJoint of his recovery the remainder of 
the family are attacked by the same 
disease. 

It is stated that the proprietor of the 
City restaurant, in company with a 
gentleman from West Superior, will 
Htart a bakery at the old stand in con- 
nection with the restaurant business. 

Mr. Smith of the firm of Smith & 
A nderson, returned yesterday and opened 
the business which has been closed for 
Ht-vera! weeks on account of the sickness 
of hot 1 1 members of the firm. 

West Duluth should be made an in- 
dependent school district. The rights 
and beoefits of a common school distri(;t 
is Ux> restricted for a villiige of its size 
and pojtulation. The legal requirements 
are simple and easily complied with. All 
that is necessary is a majority vote of 
the district and the election of a board 
of directors. Innumerable benefits 
would be conferred uptm us by the 
change, and the matter should receive 
the early attention of the people. 

West Duluth has been made a joint 
billing station by the Northern Pacific 
and St. Paul & Duluth. Freight from 
iHiluth will be switched to West Duluth. 
Freight between West Duluth and points 
on the Northern Paciffic will take Du- 
luth rates. This makes West Duluth an 
eastern terminal of the Northern Pa 
L-ific. 



EXPLOSIONS OF GAS. 
Four Weli l>i|;g:erti Horribly Burned; 
Many arc Hurt in Cincinnati. 
PiTFSBURG, Pa., Jan. 25. At Dehaven 
Station, Pa., on the Pittsburg «fc Western 
railroad, a natural gas well with a press- 
ure of 5(X) pounds ignited last evening 
while four drillers were plugging it. 
The four men were terribly burned, 
but all but one, (Jeorge Moore, will re- 
cover. The well is still burning and it is 
probable that it will be necessary to 
smother the fire with a great smokestack, 
as was successfully done at the great 
Murrysville gas-well fire a few years ago. 



CoLUMuus, Ohio, Jan. 2ij.— Last night 
an alarm of fire called the fire depart 
ment out. A large crowd rushed to the 
scene of the fire. An explosion had 
occurred in a one-story dwelling. The 
people crowded by hundreds into the 
narrow alley and pushed up close to the 
house. The fire was almost under con- 
trol when another terrific explosion rent 
the air. A sheet of flame burst fn 
building and a great mass of 
beams and stone, that thirty seconds 
before had constituted a two-story brick, 
were flying with terrific force through 
the air. The scene that followed was 
terrible. Pe<iple ran shrieking in all 
directions, while the alley was instantly 
covered with a mass of debris. Some 
twenty were badly injured and one was 
instantly killed. 



Washington, Jan. 25.— The %ht 

raging over the Duluth land oflice is 
causing Congressman Comstock any 
number of sleepless nights. There are 
upwards of six candidates and each can 
•lidate seams to be backed by a strong 
faction. The charges that have Ijeen 
preferred against Receiver Maginnis are 
being investigated, and u})on tlie result 
of this in k-estigation depends very largelv 
the success of one of tho six candi- 
dates. 

Commijsioner of the General Land 
Oflice (Jroff has intimated to Mr. Com- 
stock eoveral times that the ap- 
pointment of Sheldon N. Frazier would 
be very aisceptable to him, but Mr. Com 
stock 86*. ms to know it would not be 
very acceptable to Duluth generally. 
Thousantsof letters have come to Mr 
Comstock regarding the battle that is 
being foujfht out in the Zenith City. He 
hopes to lie able to render a decision re- 
garding a candidate pretty soon. There 
IS a rumor that should he not make up 
his mind -ery soon the appointment will 
be made v ithout his recommendation. 



PHILADEI.PH1A, Jan. 25.— Miss Nellie 
Bly arrived at Broad street station at 
1:48 this afternoon. She is due in New- 
York at about 4 p. m. There was a 
great crowd gathered at the station to 
see her. 



Only One Killed. 

.w^^".^' ^°' '^?°- '-^-Wm. Vaughan 
shot George Johnson dead l<>iday 
Vaughan was on his way home when he 
met Johnson, who followed him. When 
they arrived at the house, and after the 
men had thrown stones at one another. 
J ahnson hred at Vaughan with his pistol 
V aughan returned Johnson's fire three 
time*, and every ball entered the brain 
Vaughan surrendered himself, claiming 
he nad killed Johnson in self-defense 



The Tariff Coniuilttee 
Washinston, Jan. 25.— The ways and 
means committee bus finallv begun the 
preparation of a tariff bill, working upon 
the lines (if the senate bill of the last 
congress. L'he lumber and wood sections 
of that bil were adopted entire with the 
exception )f a clause relating to rattan 
and chair canes, which has been attacked 
before con mittee, and has consequently 
been held for future action. The sched- 
ule of the senate bill (covering books and 
roni a I paper was also adopted. This action is 
bricks, I prehminar,-, and all schedules adopted 
will be suLject to revision when the bill 
is complet* d. 

Democratic members of the committee 
manifested their opposition by offering 
substitutee for the sections adopted in 
the line of the provisions of the Mills 
bill of the last congress, but they were 
rejected by party votes. 



See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. Macfakl-ane & Austin. 



TALKS T O THE TAILORS. 

Cleveland t'rjft'H Tarlir Reform to the 
Cloth Isernj To Tax American Meat. 
Chic.\go, Jan. 25.— A letter from ex- 
President Cleveland was read at the con- 
cluding session of the Custom Cutters 
National convention. Mr. Cleveland 
says in part: 

"The question of tariff reform directly 
affects the people of this 'and in a sub- 
stantial way, and they ought to be inter- 
e.-^ted in its discussion. I am afraid a 
great many of our fellow-citizens are too 
apt to regard this as a political question, 
affecting them in some remote way. 
This induces a neglect of the subject 
and a willingness t<j blindly follow the 
party to which they happen to belong 
to your association, discussing these 
questions for themselves. If this bedone 
intelligently and with intent to secure 
the truth, tariff reformers have no need 
to fear the result of the discussion." 

This letter was written in reply U^ one 
from the president of the association 
asking for an opinion on the tariff ques- 
tion as It affected the merchant tailors. 
.\notlier letter was sent to President 
Harrison, but no reply was received. 



Afraid They'll .sink I'nder the MlHsixKippi 

Cairo, 111., Jan. 2.J.— Officers of the 
steamer City of Baton Rouge, passing 
up, report a heavy shock of earthquake 
at BoUfaot lake, Tenn., at 3 o'clock this 
morning. A veritable panic resulted 
among the inhabitants of the little city, 
who have not forgotten the results of an 
earthquake many years ago, when New 
Madrid and much of the adjacent terri- 
tory sunk beneath the Mississippi. 

A. GenerouH l.ondoner. 

London, Jan. 25.— .\t a meeting of the 
court of common council today the lord 
mayor received a letter from a resident 
of this city who desired that his name 
should not be given, donating the sum 
of 8.jOO,(X.)0 for the establishment of a 
hospital convalescent home. The lord 
mayor stated that the money had al- 
ready been dejKxjited in the Bank of 
Eugland. 



AcroSH the l,ine. 

Ottawa, Ont., Jan. 25. In the house 
of commons yesterday the member for 
Westmoreland drew the attention of the 
house to the enormous increase in the 
con8umi)tion of dressed American meat 
in the maritime provinces. Nine years 
ago this importation amounted to 300,000 
lbs. Chicago houses have since worked 
up a trade there representing nearly 4.000,- 
(XX) lbs annually. The Canadian farmer, 
unprovided with refrigerator cars, can- 
not compete with the American pro- 
ducer, and the member urged parliament 
to double the duty. His petition will be 
duly considered. 



Talmase Coming Home. 

New Yokk, Jan. 25.— Dr. Talmage 
sailed for New York today on the Aura- 
nia. He brings with him a stone from 
the River Jordan, another from Mount 
Calvary, a third from Mount Hill Ath- 
ens where Paul preached, and several 
other souvenirs of his trip, which will be 
used in the construction of his new tab- 
ernacle. 



J. A. Boggs offers profitable invest- 
ments in Superior. This property will 
double in six months. 



Notice. 

Owing to the uncomfortableness of 
the building formerly occupied by the 
African Metliodist Episcopal denomina- 
tion, they have moved to Ingalls Hall, 
Superior street, where they would be 
pleased to see all. The musical part of 
the service has been greatly improved 
by the addition of Professor 
Z. A. Coleman, of St Paul, a gifted 
gL^ntleman of therace, who is 
known for his musical abil- 
ity. Ab a vocalist he ranks second to 
none in the city, therefore if you desire 
a rare musical treat come out' and hear 
him. Servict>s Sunday evening at 8:15. 



Indian riv»r oranges at Victor Huot's. 



BISHO P VS. P RIEST. 

Judge Ney of Iowa Says a Hishop Can 
.Silence a Priest. 
B.\LTiMORE, Jan. 25. -The recent de- 
cision of Judge Ney of the district court 
of Iowa to the effect that a bishop of the 
Itoman Catholic church acts within his 
ecclesiastical authority in silencing a 
priest for good and sufficient reasons; 
and that no civil suit will lay against a 
bishop for such action, naturally attracts 
considerable interest here, as the home 
of the cardinal archbishop of the 
United States. 

Cardinal Gibbons never permits him- 
self to be interviewed on matters of this 
kind, but a priest attached to the car- 
dinalate expressed the opinion that the 
decision was eminently right and just, 
and that it afforded an evidence of the 
fact that the courts of this country were 
disposed to recognize that ecclesiastical 
authority was outside the pale of the 
law. The decision he added, would 
serve a good purpose in acting as a warn- 
ing to priests who were disposed to defy 
their ecclesiastical superiors in the be- 
lief that they would be ui)held by the 
courts. 

SEVERE JUD GMENTS. 

Two Notorious KaNlera Iturglurtt get Long 

Sentences. 

Pittsburg, Pa., Jan. 25.— The heaviest 
sentence passed in the courts in this 
city for many years were given William 
Smith, alias Baltimore Harry, and James 
Burns, alias Baltimore Jim, who pleaded 
guilty to seven charges of burglary. The 
first named received twenty-one years 
and six months and the latter seventeen 
years and six months in the penitentiary. 

These two men are well-known char- 
acters all over the country. Their 
principal crime was the robbery of the 
store of L. K. St. Claire, in Wilkinsburg, 
a suburb of this city. St. Claire waa 
shot by them and almost died from the 
effects of his injuries. The extreme 
penalty on all the charges was seventy- 
five years to each. 

Too Bad They Got So Little 

Chica(;o, Jan. 25.— B. P. Hutchinson, 
the board of trade man, in an interview 
this afternoon states that after investi- 
gation he is unable to ascertain that the 
embezzlement by Clerks Stoner and 
King mulcted him beyond 82000 or 
^3000. His investigations, however, 
have only been extended through the 
b'wks of tne past two or three months. 
Whatever he may have lost previous to 
that, is now difficult of ascertainment. 
Mr. Hutchinson maintains that both 
Stoner and King are still in the city and 
that he has today received proffers of 
compromis e from their friends. 

The Builders Special. 

Philadelphia, Jan. 25. —A train called 
the "Builders .Special" left this city on 
the Baltimore &. Ohio this morning, in 
charge of District Psissenger Agent C. P. 
Mackenzie, for St. Paul. On board the 
train there are 100 builders, fifty from 
Philadelphia, twenty-five from Balti- 
more and twenty-five f.-om Washington, 
who go to attend the fourth annual con- 
vention of the National Association of 
Builders, which will be held in St. Paul 
on the 27t h, 28th and 29th ins t. 
New York Victorious. 

Washington, Jan 25.— There was an- 
other protracted struggle in the house 
committee on the World's fair to-day out 
of which the New York party came off 
victorious. 



A Mine on Fire. 

Iron Mjuntain, Mich., Jan. 25.— 
[Special.]— No. 5 shaft of the big Lud- 
ington iron mine was burned this morn- 
ing before daylight. No miners were I 
injured, the ugh there were many nar- 1 
rowesca]>e8 The loss will be heavy,' 
is insu red. 



bu 



Iho Modus Vivendi. 

Otiaw.v, Ont, Jan. 25.— Official notice 
has been gi'ren that the modus vivendi 
will expire en Feb. 15. 



".\ MuKicians-Critiiism." 
To the Editor of The Herald. 

We read wi4,h interest the article in 
1 he News this morning under the above 
heading. We are neither musicians nor 
musical critics but have perhaps the 
ordinary appreciation of the fitness of 
things. The self-mstituted critic of the 
article referred to may possess rare 
merits as a musician and his musical 
tastes may be supecior to those of others 
of the audience who listened to the con- 
cert, but it is certain that he has no 
more good sense than he needs, and the 
faner instincts of a gentleman are not 
abnormally developed. The daily press 
IS usually capable of giving to the pub- 
lic such information and criticisms as 
are necessary without assistance but the 
case in hand furnishes one exception. If 
our ''musical critic" has done as much 
to advance the interests of music and 
cultivatecorrect tastes and methods as 
those whom he wantonly attacks 
well and good we are all 
open to suggestions, and Duluth is al- 
ways ready to welcome any who seek to 
mould Its social, moral or intellectual 
growth, but we suspect that the gratu- 
ilious criticism is the outcome of a tor- 
pid liver rather than of asthetic tastes. 
If he really desires to advance the in- 
terests of music and has the talent and 
ability to do so he will find more com- 
mendable methods than carping at those 
who are truly anxious to bring about 
this result. 

Several of the Acdienoe 

Don't forget the grand masquerade on 
skates at the West End Parlor Skating 
rink Saturday night. Everybody should 
mask, as there are three good prizes to 
be given away. 



Any kind or description of ledger, 
j(.urnal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 

If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root &, Co.'b ad. 



Hammond 
perior street. 



typewriter, 3-27 Weet Su- 



Indian river oranges at Victor Huot's. 



C. H. GRAVES & CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1869. 



REAL 



ESTATE. 



We hav.. a large list of choice Residence Lots, Acres. 
Property, ol which we have exclusive control. 



Business and Dock 



We negotiate loans 



LOANS. 



,• ^ „ ■.. - . . ., . " a"y amount on improved city property, and for nar- 
ties wishing to build, at the lowest current rates of interest. 

INSURANCE. 

Ourlist of companies comprises some of the oldest and largest in exist- 
We g ive special attention to the careful writing of policies and prompt 



ance. 

and fair settlement of all 



losses. 



ROOMS 2, 3 AND 4. BOARD OF TRADE BLOG, DULUTH, MINN. 



-I- m? - ACRES -I- 



NEXT TO LAND THAT WILL BE 



Platted This Spring. 




1i-LEQRA H BRIEF3. 

There is a marked decrease in the 
number of deaths reported at the Chi- 
cago health office, though the grip was 
shown to still have rather a strong hold. 
There were twelve cases in which infiu- 
enza was assigned as the direct cause of 
death. 

Immediately upon the opening of par- 
liament Mr. Parnell will bring up the 
question of the forged Piggott letters 
published by The Times. 

A large barn at Mapes, belonging lo 
Emery Mapes, burned last night. Over 
100 head of cattle perished. The loss is 
fully mW; insurance hu\t that. 

R. G. Duu & Co. say business has a 
decidedly more favorable appearance. 
The colder weather has brought a gen- 
eral increase of activity, and an improve 
ment in collections. 

The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just ae you want 
them, and do the work for you promptlv 



C, SARGENT. 



REAL ESTATE. 



Special Bargains I Snaps. 

50-14, 25 percent below 



the 



I 00 Acres in 4- 
market. 
200 Ac-es in 47-16 at $5 per acre. 

Lands in 28-50- 1 5 at a great bargain. 
SeN'eral pieces of acreage on the hill below 
ket. 



the 



ma 



2 Lot!; on Superior Street, Endion.^ 
63 Lots adjoining Lonaon, cheap. 

A few of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on easy terms. 

A few desirable lots in Endion for sale without 
ment, if improved. 



cash 



pay. 



J. M. ROOT & CO., 



Room 0, Metropolitan Block 



I 



-I 



ir 




m -rrn^ 



V^L, KinL.J W I I - ^ l" *' 



v- -* -" - 



«l>t*'*' " l -l i Hl- ^J-JB-M-M l 



m *tm 



I 




1 



f) 



2 



DtTLUTH irEitoTG HEBAXD: JAKTTARY 



26, 1890. 



ELIOT LORD, Publlshar. 

PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subscription Rates: 

Dallj', by mall, p*r year $7.00 

Dally, by mall, per three montha 2.00 

Dally, by miili, p^r one month ' o 

IN TH« CITY. 

DaUy, by carrier, per week '8 

Bntered at the poetofflce at Duluth, Minn., as 
Moond-class mall matter. 

laTThe Wiishlngrlon office of The Herald Is 
at llil New York avenue, N. W., where the 
paper is kept on Ule and where The Herald 
oorreapondent will welcome visitors from the 
Norttai^st. ^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ 

THE CHOICE OF CANDIDATES. 

Before The Herald goes to press for 
ita last edition the selection of the re- 
publican party in this city for mayor 
will have been made and the candidate 
put fairly before the city for judgment. 
We have confidence that the convention 
will make no mistake in this matter, but 
that after a harmonious discussion and 
proper presentation of the qualifications 
and availability of the men who have 
been suggested for the place, the dele- 
gates will unite upon a choice which 
will command the confidence and loyal 
support of the party in this city. The 
Herald has already expressed its belief 
thai there is no substantial public ad- 
vantage and no controlling reason for 
the drawing of party lines in city elec- 
tions, but it has also stated with equal 
plainness that it is practically idle to 
cavil at a prevailing practice at this 
hour, and it remains for sober-thinking 
men to accept the situation as it stands 
and govern their actions accordingly. 

If a party in acordance with common 
precedent puts in nomination a man 
against whom no word of well-grounded 
objection can be justly brought and who 
is rightly qualified by the training of 
public service and years of acquaintance 
with the needs of a city, as well as by 
force of character and business ability 
for the place which he is called to fill 
on what ground will loyal party men and 
public-spirited citizens decline to stand 
behind him? Will it be because of the 
dread of scurrilous abuse and patent 
misrepresentation? We think not. Such 
methotls of opposition will not weigh 
one jot in the minds of sober, thought- 
ful citizens. The party candidate will 
be tried in the balanance of his own 
private and public life and deserved rep- 
utation, and if he is not found wanting, 
he will command the cordial and active 
support of every loyal republican 
unless a manifestly better man 
for the place is named by a body of 
advocates who have substantial chances 
of electing the man of their choice. 

The question of support in practical 
city politics is not one of ideal prefer- 
ences. It is with an election in Duluth 
and not in the moon with which we 
have to deal. To rally and justify sin- 
cere and hopeful effort behind a candi- 
date for mayor, he must be a man who 
has a living chance of winning and all 
effort expended in the dandling of an 
obviously forlorn hope in a contest of 
this kind is apt to be worse than wasted. 
For the sole subatantial effect of divi 
sion and personal kite-flying is 
too often merely to distract atten- 
tion from the practical issues 
at stake and to bring about the unnatu- 
ral success of the weaker cause, the 
weaker party or the weaker candidate. 
Note clearly that we are not condemning 
all forlorn hopes or all vam struggles 
even m practical politics. The case may 
arise when it is necessary for a man with 
a conscience to stanS for his conviction 
of right even if he stands alone. But 
it surely behooves him in these worldly 
affairs ot ours to probe his own heart 
and assure himself beyond reasonable 
doubt that he is not actuated by rabid 
animosity, bitter pique, selfish ambition, 
inordinate self-esteem or invincible 
crankiness, rather than by a sober con- 
viction of duty. 

In the case actually before ns, in the 
question of our own city administration 
for the coming term, let every honest, 
level-headed man look over the situation 
with his own eyes and for himself. Let 
him weigh the candidates set up for his 
ratification, their character, their experi- 
ence, their abQity, their backing and 
their chances of success. Let him then 
jadge for himself for whom he will cast 
his vote, examining all the evidence that 
may be put in by their respective advo- 
atee, and taking into account all the 
reasons for and against the choice of 
any. Upon such a survey of the field 
and such a deliberation he will cast his 
vote intelligently and rightly. If the 
vote of this city is so cast, no loyal citi- 
zen will quarrel with the result. 



what is there to prevent the city from 
undertaking and executing the cleaning 
of its business portion at least, in use by 
the public generally, at the charge of the 
general city fund for such purposes? 
This can be done either with or without 
a special vote of the council. All that 
the public cares for is that it shall be 
done, and done without any more waste 
words. 

The Herald is getting a great many, a 
very great many, answers to ita guessing 
contest on the population of Duluth, 
and the contest is exciting a great deal 
of talk and interest. But so far, with 
but few exceptions, there have been not 
more than one guess from one person. 
Bear in mind that you can guess a hun- 
dred times a day if you choose to, and 
that every guess, recorded on a coupon, 
will be counted in the decision. Guess 
early and often. It might be well, too, 
to say that The Herald in no way en- 
dorses the directory figures published in 
the guess article. It gives them for just 
what they are worth and directory fig- 
ures are not ordinarily worth very much. 
It is a well known fact that these direc- 
tory figures are usually paddetl. often to 
an outrageous extent. The figures of 
the directory are published simply to 
serve as a pointer to those who may 
want them. So, if you have been gov- 
erned in any way by these figures make 
up for it by more guesses. 



NOTED PEOPLE. 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



"This is the time of year when the slanting: 
grades on Third and Fourth streets are to be 
seen at their best, or worst," said a resident of 
East Third street last niirht. "The sleighs 
slide off to one side, and a few days ago when 
the fire engine and hook and ladder trucks 
were being driven along Third street I ex. 
pflcted every minutejto see the whole caboodle 
capsize. Part of tlie time the truck was run- 
ning on one runner. It was a mystery to mo 
how they kept right side up. I believe 1 have 
heard more bad language in five minutes from 
teamsters who are compelled to drive on these 
streets than you will hear in a week on any 
other street, and all on account of the miser- 
able shape of the roadway. The streets should 
certainly be leveled next spring, and I 
don't believe the property-owners sliould be 
made to pay for it either. The grading was 
done in the face of protests from residents, 
and consequently they were not responsible 
for it. The city should do the work. Its bad 
enough for the property owners to put up 
with the inconvenience of having the road 
torn up and the sidewalks removed, without 
iMjing compelled, to pay for the privilege." 
' * * * 

"Young Americans little know what a priv- 
ilege they possess iu being natives of a free 
country," said T. M. Helinski today. "When- 
ever they Imagine themselves cramped for 
want of sufficient opportunities for study, 
they should contrast their condition with that 
of the young Poles, who through tlie tyran- 
nical law of foreign despots are not allowed to 
speak their own language. When the little 
ones are old enough to go to scb(X)l, the first 
lesson impressed upon them is that they must 
not utter a word in their mother tongue, under 
pain of the most frightful penalties. Even 
the prayers learned at their mother's knee 
must be said in German. The effect of this 
pernicious system is that when the child ar- 
rives at the age of 12 or 
13 at which time It is sup- 
posed to bepld enough for work, very little has 
been learned. Is it any wonder that a large 
proportion of the people of this oppressed na- 
tionality are degenerate and ignorant? And 
this condition of things is carried on even 
among the better classes of the Polish people. 
The PolUh students are dUcriminated against 
in the same outrageous way. The Prussians 
are allowed to complete their studies before 
terving in the regular army, in which all are 
compelled to serve a year; but no matter at 
what stage of his studies the Polish student 
may be, at the age of twenty year?, he must go 
into the ranks. Is it any wonder that the Po- 
lander calls himself tlie man without a father 
or country? 



On excellent authority, it is said, that 
the Prince and Princess of Wales and 
possibly their second son, Prince George, 
will visit America as soon as the present 
gples moderate. 

King Humbert of Italy has been 
obliged to have all his teeth pulled. 
This misfortune is the outcome of 
chronic dyspepsia. 

Amesbury, Mass., boasts another 
"grand old man" besides WhittSiker, in 
the person of Albert Gallatin Morton, 
who was born in 18(V1, began preaching 
in 182;j, and has occupied his pulpit reg- 
ularly ever since without in a single in- 
stance writing out a sermon. 

Margaret Deland's hands are so full 
of work for 1890 that she cannot be in- 
duced to contract for anything that 
must be deli vered before the middle of 
1891. This is what may be truly called 
literary success. 

Governor Scales of North Carolina 
weighs nearly 300 pounds, and Ls a pow- 
erful stump speaker — a sort of platform 
scales. 

LOVE'S SEASONS. 



lAmelle Rives in Harper's Miigazlne.] 
The wall-flowers to the frolic wind 

Do dunce their golden aigulets. 
And elf-maids steal tlie hawthorn beads 

To wear for fairy amulets. 
The spring is here, the spring is here— 
The love-time of the year, mv dear! 

All heavy hang the apple boughs. 
Weighed down by balls of yellow gold; 

The poppy cups, so flery bright, 
Meseems would burn the heart4S they hold. 

The summer's here, the summer's here — 

The kiss-time of the year mydearl 

The birds are winging for the south. 

The elf-maids haste them to their bowers. 
And dandelion balls do float 

Like silver ghosts of golden flowers. 
The autumn's here, the autumn's here— 
The wife-time of the year, my dear! 

Now are the heavens not more gray 
Than are the eyes of her I love; 

More dainty-white than her sweet breast 
The suow lies not the earth above. 

Tiie winter's here, the wint*;r'8 hero; 

But love-time lasts the year, my dear! 

COMPOSITE AFFLICTION. 



BETTER AND BETTER. 

A I.Hrge .iudienen Greets the Tamperance 
Lecturer; Dolug Much Good. 

P. A. Burdick again addressed the 
people of Duluth at the Methodist 
church last evening. In the first place 
he gave notice that there will be a meet- 
ing tonight, and gave his reason for hold- 
ing meetings Saturday evening. Be- 
cause, said he, the saloon keepers 
on that night make their places as 
attractive as possible that they 
draw those who have received their 
week's pay, and thus rob their hard 
earnings. We can all look back to some 
period, he said, an event which was a 
turning point in our lives. 

He then gave a history of that por- 
tion of his life in which he fell, 
and his restoration, which for 
pathos and power has hardly ever 
been surpassed before a Duluth audience. 
At one time there would scarcely be a 
dry eye in the house, and in a few 
moments the audience would be held 
spellbound by the power of his elo- 
queiice, and then again the bouse would 
be filled with the sound of applause. 
The whole talk was filled with the love 
of Christ and of his fellow-man. 

Tomorrow evening he will speak again 
in Temple Opera. All are invited. 



CITY BRIEFS. 



[Kehoboth ."iunday Herald.] 

Speak, O lovely Ann Eliza, with a terrible 
coryza, 
Abd a wheezy respiration full of sighs and 
husky moans. 
With a constant lachrymation, and a nasal in- 
tonation, 
From catarrhal inflammation o'er the turbi- 
nated bonus! 

Why, thou young and happy maiden, is thy 
conversation laden 
With a copious addition of abortive b's 
and d's':' 
And from whence did you derive a red and 
swollen conjunctiva. 
And a frequent iuclluatiou to incontinently 
sneeze'/ 



which you suffer 
whence the 



Is this malady outrageous 
with contagious'/ 
Epidemic, or endemic'/ Tell me 
thing arose. 

Where its place of incubation, what its future 
destination! 
Spake the lovely Ann Eliza, smUlng sweetly, 
"No one nose." 



POLL Y AT S EVEN. 

LHenry Russel Wray.] 
I ponder very oft 
On your eyes so dark and soft 
Little girl; 

And caanot now abuse. 
Though you me heartless refuse 
ualf a curl. 

pa 

I'll trow that by eleven 
You've a beau. 

^fo, not one now, my dear? 
His name is— I cannot hear. 
Whispers low. 

He's old and walks so slow. 
Well, but how should I Ulm know? 
Ua! Ha! Ha! 

The beau Is I? You pet 
And merciless cdjuette 
With grandpa. 



Duluth Poeten will be the name of a 
Swedish newspajier to be published 
here. A stock t»mpany has been formed 
and its officers are E. G. Swanstrom, 
president; Nils Hall, vice-president; 
Louis Rietz, secretary; Dr. J. Eklund, 
treasurer. The other incorporators -^are 
C. W. Renard, G. Bergquist and F,' I*. 
Engberg. 

A race at the East end rink was rather 
a tame affair last night on account of 
one of the contestants becoming dis- 
couraged when he had gone twenty-eight 
laps. The other races are declared off. 

.\ &10,000 four-story brick building 
90x100 feet is to be built on Twentieth 
avenue west early in the spring. The 
plans are now being prepared by the ar- 
chitect. 

Hanson Wall paid a fine of ^ for 
cruelty to a horse this morning. 

A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. 
Thomas Jefferson of 428 West Fourth 
street yesterday morning. 

The Bethel brigade boys formed in 
proceesion this afternoon and followed 
the dead boy, Glenn Roebuck, one of 
their members to the cemetery. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office, Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
2 below; 3 p. m., 8 above; 6 p. m., 16 
above; 10 p. m., 10 above; 7 a. m.. 22° 
above; 9 a. m., 21' above; 12 m., 2;") 
above. Maximum, 25 above. Mini- 
mum, 2' below. Daily range, 27 ^ 

■St. Paul & UnUitli «>m<'iaU. 

President R. S. Hayes, General Man- 
ager Plough, Superintendent Copeland 
and Chief Engineer Beeston of the St. 
Paul life Duluth road were in the city 
last night. They were here on a tour of 
inspection niade necessary by the death 
of Mr. E. L. Dudley. "We are here 
looking over the road," said one of them 
to a Ilerald reporter. "The newly-ap- 
pointed officials of the road visit Duluth 
to carry out Mr. Dudley's plans." The 
officials spoke feelingly of Mr. Dudley's 
death and highly of his capabilities as a 
railroad man. 



THEATRICAL UOSSIP. 



Out of ILii Own >Iouth. 

Duluth News' editorial, Duluth News' editorial, 
Jan. 25: 



Jan. M: 
The People's Candi- 
date. 

A disposition 
part of the bei ter class 
of citizens of whatever 
political belief to cut 
loose from party ulHli 
ations in the c<imiug 
municipal contest Is 
very marked. It is not 
a question of repub- 
licanism or of democ- 
racy, but a question ot 
clean, wholesome ad- 
ministration or of foul 
ring rule. The city 
official matters are in 
a most complicated 
shape. White the 
mayor for the past 
three years was nomi- 
nally a republican, a 
majority of his ap- 
pointees were demo- 
crats. The News would 
have no fault to And 
with this fact if the ap- 
pointments were for 
the liest interests of 
the city— but such was 
not the case. In his 
mismanagement of this 
city Mayor Sutphin has 
simply arrayetl the 
gang against the peo- 
ple—this is the facias 
plainly as it can be put. 
For this reason the 
coming municipal cam 
paif^rn will be <j contest 
tij tiie {eof'U against the 
ganff, and unless The 
News greatly mistakes! 
popular .sentiment, the 
people will win. 



The Herald is espec- 
ially sensitive concern- 
-„ tL„ing the "gang," and one 
on the vTould think that al- 
reaily the prospective 
candidate of the re- 
publican convention 
had been the victim of 
vilest vituperation, to 
read itspathetlc whine. 
No oi e has said a wonl 
about either the 
•gang" or its candi- 
date, and it is unfort- 
unate that the organ 
of that clement has 
itself called It by so 
questionable a name. 



The Weather Bulletin 




Meteorological report received at Duluth 


»€lnn., 8 a. m. Jan '25, 18W). 


Pt,.*CE8. 


Bar 

29.58 


Ther.j Wind, Bain. 


Weather 


Duluth 


24 


SW 




Cloudless 


Pt. Arthur.. 


•-'«.■«< 


36 


w 


T 


Cloudy 


Winnipeg. 


20.74 


-16 


NW 




Cloudless 


St. Vincent 


•i..h.-,\ 


-12 


N 





Cloudless 


Q'AppeUe. I'.'it.Bii 


- 4 


Calm 




Cloudless 


Assinib'ne . 


2H.42 


24 


SW 




Cloudy 


Helena.. . 


•-'!».:« 


32 


SW 


.08 


Snow 


Huron, Dak 


21t.tkj 


12 


SB 




Cloudless 


3t. Paul .... 


•-".' M 


22 


SB 




Cloudy 


La Crosse.. 


.^» 72 


28 


a 




Cloudy 
Cloud ess 


Bismarck. .. ' 


-'9..T>< 


18 


NW 




Moorhead . , 


-•y.H2 


2'J 


Calm 




Cloudy 



T in rain column Indicates trace. One (1) 
Inch of rain or melted snow e<iual8 ten (lOi in- 
ches of snowfall. Minus!—) in temperature 
column indicates l>elow zero. 

W. H. Fali^on, 

Sergeant Signal Corps 



The following extract from the Pioneer 
Press of yesterday, which was published 
in the last edition of Ihe Herald, we 
wish to commend to the most attentive 
consideration of our city fathers. 

The city street force will commence this af- 
ternoon to clean snow and Ice from the side- 
walks in the principal streets where the work 
has not been already done by the property 
owners. Under an amendment to the city 
charter made by the legislature of 1887, If own- 
ers do not clean their walks within twenty- 
four hours after tlie fall of snow or formatien 
of the ice, the city engineer is re^iuired to do so 
and return a sworn statement of the cost to the 
county auditor, who will collect from the prop- 
erty frontage in the same manner as other as- 
aesBments are collected. 

Now if our own charter does not ad- 
mit of the like requirement from prop- 
erty owners, as has been stated in the 
council as an excube for dilatoriness, 



DuLCTH, Jan. 2.3.— Loca/ forecast for 
twenty-four fiourn, ending 10 a. m, Jan. 

2^: Colder, fair weather. 



Washington, Jan. 'lo.— Forecast for 
twenty-four hours, ending H a. in. to- 
morrow: For iXorth and South Dakota ■ 
Increasing cloudiness and light »row or 
rain; variable winds; colder in west- 
ern portion, warmer, followed by colder 
m eastern port ion. For Minnesota: 
Light local snow.n; variable winds; 
colder Sunday. 



Ka»t Knd .Skating Rink. 

David N. Morison, champion fast 
skater of Duluth, and W. W. Brown, 
champion fast skater of W^isconsin, will 
skate three races at above rink on the 
following dates for $.30 a side and a gold 
medal to be given by the rink, Friday 
evening, Jan. 24th, distance, three miles; 
Tuesday evening, Jan. -JSth, distance, 
three miles; and Thursday evening, .Jan. 
30, distance, five miles, the one winning 
best two out of three races to be declared 
the winner. Judges to be selected on 
the ice. Walkers military band will be 
in attendance. 



"The Dark Secret," by a splendid 
company, and Ned Hanlon, the champion 
oarsman, as an attraction, will appear at 
the Temple Opera the first week in 
February. 

Murry & Murphy, Keller and the 
Bostonians are among next month's at- 
tractions at the Temple. 

The "Gondoliers," notwithstanding the 
criticism the company received on its in- 
itial .\merican production, is reported to 
be crowding the Park theater. New York 
nightly. 

William S. Gilbert and Sir Arthur 
Sullivan sailed for this countrj from 
Liverpool Thursday. Both will attend 
the opening production of "Gondoliers" 
at the Chicago opera house. 

New York is full of gossip anent Rich- 
ard Manslield's financial affairs. .\c- 
cording to one of the stories now in cir- 
culation Eben D. Jordan, the Boston 
merchant, advanced i5100,000 for Mr. 
Mansfield, all or nearly all of which has 
been lost. The London engagement of 
the actor was not a financial success. 
One gentleman who claims to have seen 
the books is authority for the statement 
that 8(30,000 was lost there. 

Mrs. Potter, Mrs. Langtry and Mrs. 
O'Sullivan Dimpfel have given up their 
effort to elevate the .\merican stage, and 
Maude Banks has become her father's 
private secretary. Miss Letjtla .\ldrich, 
niece of Senator Stewart of Nevada, 
rushes into the breach on the Washing- 
ton stage and will endeavor to raise the 
tone of the drama. 

On Feb. 3, at the Chicago opera house, 
Manager Henderson will produce for the 
first time Gilbert &, Sullivan's latest 
great comic opera "The Gondoliers," 
with an American company, a much bet- 
ter organization than the English com- 
pany now inflicting new York. This 
opera is now packing the Saroy theatre 
in London to the do<.)rs every night. 
Seats cannot be bought three or four 
months in advance, and it is likely that 
the run will by far eclipse either that of 
"Pinafore" or "The Mikado." The same 
story is also true of the production at 
the Park theatre, New York. The man- 
ager of the Chicago opera house has re- 
ceived the rights ijf the piece from Pitts- 
burg to California, and will produce it 
upon the above date with a remarkably 
strong cast. 

The musical farce-comedy "Zig-Zag" 
will appear at Temple Opera, Jan. 27 
and 28. It has been played in all the 
principal cities of America. It abounds 
in the joUiest of fun and song and dance. 
There is no end to the comedy surprises 
which create loud shrieks of laughter. 
The Mythological Minuet introduced in 
the third act is a pretty feature. The 
whole of the stage is draped with mas.s- 
ive black portiere while the classically 
costumed dancers glide through the 
graceful minuet. Miss .\nna Boyd sus- 
tains her part of Flirt with charming 
abandon. Hor s<jngs are all sparkling 
and her dancing sprightly and exceed- 
ingly clever. 

Nature in Convul.«iou 
Is terrific. Volcanic eruptions, cyclones, 
earthquakes are awfully and tremend- 
ously picturesque, but scarcely desirable 
to emulate in action and effect by the 
administration of remedies which pro- 
duce con /ulsion and agony in the ab- 
normal portion of the human frame. 
Such is the effect of the old fashioned 
violent purgatives happily falling more 
and more into disuse, and of which Hos- 
tetter's Stomach Bitter.s is the whole- 
some, pleasant and far more eff ctive 
sucoedaneum. They weakened tiie in- 
testines—the Bitters invigorates them. 
They left the bowels inactive, bec;iuse 
incapacitated by ensuing feebleness. 
The Bitters, on the contrarv, and be- 
cause it enables, not forces, them to act 
—a vast and fortunate difference- i>cr- 
petuates their activity and regularity. 
Ihe hver is beneficially stimulaKd, as 
the kidneys also are, by this medicine, 
which easily ajnquers, also, malaria, ner- 
vousness and rheumatism. 



A Sensible Calendar, 

As usual at this time of the year the 
new crop of calendars is coming in, they 
are of all sorts, sizes, shapes and kinds, 
and many of them can be had for the 
asking, but the best calendar that comes 
to our office is that published by N. W. 
Ayer & Son, newspaper advertising 
agents, Philadelphia. This calendar is 
14x"22 inches, the upper portion being 
beautifuUv printed in colors, while the 
monthly sheets are printed with figures 
so plain that they can be seen at a dis- 
tance. 

.\ttentlon. Property Holders t 

The undersigned are a committee ap- 
pointed by a inei^ting representing all 
classes of property holders in the Third 
division of Duluth. 

They were appointed to securethe co- 
operation of all proi)erty holders in the 
division who desired to join in a suit to 
quiet the adverse claim of Frederick 
Prentice to an undivided one-half inter- 
est in the division. 

The Prentice claim has been twice ad- 
versely adjudicated by the courts, and 
is generally and ju.stly regarded as with- 
out any foundation whatever. Never- 
theless, he persists in asserting it, and 
can make it a source of annoyance and 
embarrassment to property hohlers for 
many years to come, unless aggressive 
measures are taken by property holders 
to dispose of it. In the absence of ag- 
gressive measures, there is also danger 
that valuable testimony in support of 
the regular title may be lose by the 
death of witnesses. 

It is proiKisesd that all property hold- 
ers in the division whodesire to take the 
necessary steps to quiet their title, shall 
join in one suit against Prentice for that 
purpose; and in order that every prop- 
erty holder in the division may have the 
benefit of such an action at a compara- 
tively trifling expense, public notice of 
this proposed suit is hereby given. 

All those who, in order to participate 
in the benefits of the action, are willing 
to contribute to its expense in propor- 
tion to the value of their several prop- 
erties, should call immediately at the 
office of Snively, Craig & Green, in the 
First National bank building (they hav- 
ing been employed to assist in the pre- 
liminary work of organization), and leave 
their names and a description of their 
Third division properties. 

Propertj- holders are particularly cau- 
tioned that the action will benefit only 
those who become parties to it. 

Dated Jan. 23, 1889. 

M. R. Baldwin, 

G. G. HAKTr.,EY, 
L. M. WlLrCUTS, 

Committee. 



POLLING 
Boundarleft of 



PLACES. 

Wards and Precincts and 



Where to Register. 

Below are given the places of registra- 
tion for the municipal election that is to 
take place on Feb. 4 next. 

First ward— Asa Dailey's luin tier office. 

Second wani— .McUeth's grocery store. East 
Superior street. 

Third wiir<l. first precln<-t— All territory east of 
l.a ,e avenue to Third avenue east. Poll- 
lug place, No. 126 East First street. 
Seco id precinct— All territory between Third 
avenue cast and Sixth avenue cast. Poll- 
ing pla«-e. iti") East Suporiorstieet. 
Third precinct— .411 territory between Sixth 
avenue east and Tenth av-nuo east. Poll- 
ing place, c-orner of Superior street 
and SVushlngt<.n av«-nue. 

Fourth WHrd, tlr.-it pret luct— .\11 territory be 
Iween Lake avenue and Third avenue west 
north of the Flrfit ward limits. Polling 
placx*, Howard building, 113 West First 
street. 
Second precinct— All territory between 
Third avenue west and Sixth avenue west 
Polling plju«,4Ui West Superior street 
Third precinct— All territory between Sixth 
avenue west and Twelfth avenue west 
Polling place, ".Ul West Superior street. 

Hflh ward, first precinct- ,\ll thut part of 
Fifth ward north of Northern Pacific rail- 
road yards and east of Uarfield avenue 
Polling [>lace, ItlOi". West Sui>erlor street. 
Seconii precliiit— All tlia'. Dart of Klces 
Point s.iuth of Northern Pacific railroad 
yanls. Polling place, 63't Garfield avenue 
Third precinct— All that part of the ward 
we-t ot Garfield and Piedmont avenues 
and north ' f the Northern Pacitic railroad 
yards. I'oUiiig place, lltrii West Michigan 
sUeet 
Sixth ward— Polling place. No 
Micl.lgan street. 



2231 West 



The Herald bindery has the best 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 

Smoke the Bndion cigar, the tinest in 
the market W. A. Pootb &. Co. 



-<-"i»-. 



Around the World. 

There was a time when a man who had 
circled the globe was a nine day's won- 
der, and if dime museum managers had 
existed then, the traveled individual 
would have been exhibited as a "freak." 
Now such a voyage is so common that 
we have ceased to regard the world's cir- 
cumference of 2.5,000 miles as anything 
large. But distance can be measured in 
another way— by the diflSculty and ex- 
pense of overcoming it. The Burlington 
system of railroads has 7000 miles of 
track. Do you realize what a lot of rails 
it would take to string out 14,000 miles 
in a single line? How much money they 
would costy How many great cities and 
thriving towns you would pass in travel- 
ing that distance? Buy a ticket over 
the finest railrod in the West, and in- 
vestigate. For information more in de- 
tail, call on any of the Burlington agents, 
or those of connecting lines, or write to 
W. J. C. Kenyon, Gen. Pass. Agent C 
B. & N. R. R, St. Paul, Minn. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 



Robert G. McDowell 



327 WEST SUPERIOR 

GROUy FLOOfl. 



ST, 



Be Sure 

If you have made up your mi; ( to buy 
Hood's Sarsaparilla '< n * 'j taduced to take 
any other. A Boston lady, ■ h - <3.. i^iplj 1» 
worthy Imitation, Ulls u^- p uj^ci. bt.o^: 

" In one store where I we.if i- buy Hood's 
SarsaparllLi the clerk tried to i:. :::c8niebuy 
their own instead of Hood's; he to;a me their'* 
would last longer; that I might take it on ten 



To Get 

days' trial; that If 1 did not like It I need not 
pay anything, etc But he could not prevail 
on me to change. I told him I had taken 
Hood's Sarsiiparllla, knew what it was. was 
Batlsned with it, and did not wunt a.iy other. 
"When I began tnkUig Hood's Sarsaparilla 
I was feeling real miserable wltli dyspepsia, 
and so weak that at times I could hardly 

Hood's 

stand. I looked like a person In oooRimp. 
Uon. Hood's S.irsaparUla did me so much 
good that I wonder at myself sometimes, 
and my friends frequently speak of it," Mbs. 
Ella. A. Gofk, ei Terrace Street, Boston. 

Sarsaparilla 

■oM by an dmgglgts. Jl ; six for f .'5. Prepared only 
l» a L HOOD A CO., Apothec. ■:...•, I.otv,: ;, i. ;.^~ ; 



OPPOSITE ST. LOUIS HOTEL. 
Offers the following 

ACBES AND LOTS 



—IN- 



SUPERIOR 



500 Acres at Haywood Sta- 
tion, on line of Omaha, with 
800,000 feet of pine, at $7 
per acre; one-half cash. 

280 Acres in sections 4 and 
5, tp. 47, at $ I 7 per acre. 
2 Lots on West Sixth street. 

10 " " Eighth " 

Block 7, West I 5th street. 
" 10, " " •• 

Block on East 23d street; 
very cheap. 

A dead shot, 80 acres in 
South Superior if taken at once. 



loo Doses One f*^-?- 



»« 



REAL ESTATE. 



LA GRIPPE 



A Few Pointers. 



Persons who have a cold are much more 
likely to take the Influenza or so called la 
grippe. 

It Is much more severe when accompanied by 
a cold. 

The most critical time Is when recovering 
from the disease, as slight exposure will often 
cause a relapse, and that is almost certain to 
end In lung fever or pneumonia. 

The feet should be kept dry and warm, the 
body well clothed and care used to avoid ex- 
posure. 

The bowels should be kept regular, and per- 
sons physically weak should take quinine t<> 
keep up the vitality. 

With these precautions and a free use of 
Chamberlain's Cough Wemedy a prompt re- 
covery is reasonably certain. That remedy is 
unequalled for a severe cold, and this disease 
requires precisely the same treatment. For 
sale by Boyca & Totman. 



6 PER CENT! 



We have at command unlimited 
amountsof money to lend promptly 
at 6 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 




Loans Made on Unimproved Property. 



The above bright and benevolent face, is Dr. 
A. W. Acker, of England, discoverer of the 
celebrated Acker's English Eeraedy for Con- 
sumption and other popular preparations. Dr. 
.\cker practised in his younger days among: the 
middle classes of London, and was the means of 
doing great good, but his health failed and he 
found himself in the grasp of consinnption, with 
a wife and child depending upon him for support. 
\Vhile in this condition, he discovered the cele- 
brate<l English Remedy, saved bin own life and 
lias since saved the lives of thousands who were 
on the sure road to death. Any man or woman 
who feels a tickUng in the throat, who coughs, 
esjiecially in the morning, who raises or has a 
tigiit feeling across the chest, who has sharp 
shooting pains through the lungs or difficulty in 
breathing, should realize that these are the first 
fymptomx of cotxsvmption which, if neglected, 
are sure to result fatally. Dr. Acker's Kiifrlish 
Remeilv has cured more than one thons;Miiil iH>r^ 
sous who imquestionably had consumption and 
who were given ui) by "their friends. It merits 
its popularity and Is sold by reputable druggist* 
in every city and town in America. You canH 
I'^iirii TO />»■ trith<nit it. 

For Sale in Duluth by Boyce & Totman 

CHICHESTER'S ENGLISH 

PENNYROYAL PILLS 

RtO CROSS DIAMOND BRAND. 

f«l4r<r aul alway. nliahk-- LBdIeA, 
a.sk UruiteiKl f.>r Mamond Brand, in 
red. m'-tftllio boit-s. s.-alM with blue j 
riMi.n. Take no other. Anpini<\ 
Id [jaittebf>mril boie^t, pink wrsppers, ar« ' 
danceroup pounterfeito. Sf Dd 4e. 
(■.tamp,., for ('articulnrtt, t«KtlmODiall 
"Keller r,>r Ludlea," in Utter, bj retmia 
Hall. Same Paper. 
IWekMter ChM-l Co., Utiltm 8tn FUlftvllk 

WHITE BEAVER'S 




BUILDING LOANS A SPECIALTY, 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTGAGES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



M&[ k PRINDLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 
Duluth National Bank Building;, 





UJ 

h- 
< 

LU 

< 
LU 

DC 



Q 

UJ 



O 
CO 

UJ 

o 

z 

UJ 

a 

z 
O 

Q. 
CO 
UJ 
CC 

oc 

o 
o 



HEALS DISEASED LUNGS. DRUGGISTS SELL IT 

r. H. SPENCE, LA CROSSE, WIS. 
SPECIAL LIST 



—OF— 



BARGAINS 



OFFERED BY 



C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage on the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated tliree lines of street railway. 
Undivided half Interest In this forty 
acres can be had for $52,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- 
dale Division 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 160 

I O Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 

The best bargain offered now is stock in the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An investment of a small sum will carry 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Duluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



C. E 



SCIENTIFICAMERICAN 

ESTABLISHED 1845. 



Is tba oldest and moat popniar sclenttflc and 
maohantcal paper published and has the largeft 
elrcnlatioD of n.\\y paper of Its claM In the world 
TnUj lllu»truted. Best class of Wood Enerav- 
tns*. PnbliBhed weekly. Send for ■peciman 
•OPT. Price fS ■ rear. Four months' trial, tl. 
MDhN a CO., PDBLlsnEKS, 361 Broadway, N T 

ARCHITECfslt BUILDERQ 
Edition of Scientific American. V 

A crmt suocf as. Kach iKsne contains rr>lnred 
UtboRrapliic plates of country aiul citr r«»«liten- 
OM or publlo buildlnim. Numcroim eneravings 
•Dd full plant and npeclOcatlons fur the use of 
■ooh as contemplate hiiildiDe. Price t2.M)a year, 
Xeta-aoopr. MUNN & CO., Pububbxbs. 

I may be secnr* 
|pd by apply- 
ing til Ml'NN 
I * Co., who 
haToliadoTer 
40 years' experience and have made orer 
lOO.Ont applications for American and Fnr> 
I elgn patents. Bend for Handbook. Corraa- 
ponAaace strictly ooDlldentlal. 

TRADE MARKS. 

Tn eMa your mark Is not resist ered tn the Pat- 
•Dt Office, apply to Mc.v.v i Co., and procura 
Immadlata protection. Sand fur liaudbouk. 

OOPTBIOIITS for books, cliarta, m*pa. 
•to., qulokly proourad. Address 

HVMM 4c CO., Pataat ••IIelt«ra. 

OavMKAi. Orncai K Bboadwat. N. T 



RICHARDSON, 

326 West Superior Street. 



coFFiii & mm^ 

30 FARGUSSON BL.<)CK. 



40 Acres, section 30-48-14. 
120 Acres, section 34-48-14. 

60 Acres, section 32-4"- 1 3, 

40 Acres, section I 8-50- 1 4. 
I 20 Acres, section 6-49-15. 

40 Acres, section 2-50-15. 

40 Acres, section 32-48-14. 

40 Acres, section 26-48-16. 

20 Acres, section 28-48-13. 

40 Acres, section 24-50-16. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-60. 1 5. 

Ail below the market. 



COFFIN & WARNER. 



JSMUSEIVIENTS. 



TEIVIPLE OPERA. 



DK. GEO. B. HAYCOCK. 



Managrer 



Two Nights of Meifiment. 

HOKStY iHD TDESDIT, 

JAN. 27 and 28. 

First appearance here of 

W. VL TILLOTSON'S 

Merry Comedy Comp'i 

In the New York success of two seasons, 

ZIG 



Presented wlti the original cast, headed 
the charm ng soubrctte, ANNA BOYD. 



by 



Sale of scats Thursday, Jan. 
In prices. 



23. 



advance 



PEOPLES THEATER. 

DULUTH, ■ JOHN 8. BARNES, MRr. 



The Best Varietj Show in the Horthwest 

Tliis wee f, commencing JAN. 20, 

310RKISEY & RICH'.S 

ALL-STAII COMEO! COMPAHy 



/I OMISSION: 

TO GALLERY, lOc; Pit, 26c; Orchestra chairs, 
36c; Boxes, 60c. 



Doors open at 7:30; performance commences 

at 8:;iO. 



CHRIS"IAN SCIENCE. 

FREE DISPE 4SARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be f >und a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the tabi* is supplied and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



db;e.c.we 




[<ERV£ AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Spoclflc for HystPria, nizzines.s. Fits, Neuraliria. Wake 
fulness, Mental I .pression, Softeniiigr of the Brain, re- 
BUltinii In insaii ly :in i leading to misery ileeav aii.l 
ileath. Pi-imatun^ Old iRe. Barremies.><. Loss of I\,»,.r 
In either sex. ln\oluiitai., 'osses.uml Sperniatm rha>a 
caused l)y over- ixertion c: the brain, self-abu-e „t 
over-iiidulgi>iu-c. Each box ct)n i -.m^ one monthV I rea:- 
Sm."^ «1 al.ot, or six for •&, m •• hv mailprep.-.i I. 
>Mth eaih on for six boxes, wi,! send purchaser 
guarantee to i -.i.A money if the tie.itmeni tails to 
cure. Ouarautet ls i >aued ami t^euuine sold ouly by 

Boyce & Tot man. Phoenix Drug Store, and 
"West Superior street, sole agents, Duluth. 
Minn. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 16 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 

OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned. 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER, 106 Second St. East. 



WANTS, FOB SALE. ETC 



ONE CENT A aORD IN ADVANCE. 



Advertisements under this head received at 
the- ioliowlng placets, besides the business of- 
llue ot 1 be Uerald : 

Kiidiou Fhariuacy, 127 Tenth avenue east. 

l{«>'«e & Totiitau, corner Fourth avenue 
and buperior street west. 

J. W. >elM>u, No. ISOI, corner Eighteenth 
avenue west aud buperior street. 

l>. Juiiitsoii, chief clerk Phillips hoteL We«t 
uululh. 



Help \Vaut<?a. 

Y^ANTEJ>-A cook for a smaU 



„.^ ,, fatnilT. 

quire, iJO bast Second street. 



In 



w 



T- ANTED— A boy at St. Lukes hospital. 



WAKTED— Competent girl for general 
housework In small family. Apply i4U9 



bench street. 



AiUL'>i<i MAN willing to work can find an 
evcuiug job by ui)plyiug to the circula- 
loi , Uei-aid olOue, between '6 and 4 p. m. 

IWiSU to employ a lew ladies on salary to 
take charge ol my bueiuess at their homes, 
i.ighi, very lUfcciuatiug aud bcalthlul. Wages 
tio per wee*, itetereuce given. Good pay lor 
pari time. Address with liiamp, Mrs. Marion 
Walker, Louisville, K.y. 

WAXTKD— A middle-aged man to look 
alter hotel olhce aud wait on table at the 
U l>er bouse, biy, Aliiiu. (iood wages to the 
rlgui man. Apply to Allretl Gillon, city hall. 

WAMKU— A gill tor general house work; 
lamiiy ot lUieu. Call In loreuoon, 411 
A uiiu aveuue ea6l. 



^60 



SAJjAUV, $40 expenses In advance, 

allowed each uionih. £jteaUy em- 
i'iv>j .,111. i at borne ul iraveuug. No suiieiuug. 
uui.j!- uellveriujs auu luaJuug eollecliuus. Ao 
poslttl Caras. Aaui'e»^ wilU stamp, Uater 6i 
Co., I'iquu, uuio. 



WAN TED— Pastry cook, 
luquiie Phillips hoU'l. 



also other help. 



WAaNxKD — At the W'omaus Employment^ 
Uui-eau. :J11 superior street east, two 
scoiid gills ana a oozen girls lor gvucral 
iiuu.>e w oiK. fcmploi iiieul ubLalueU liee ot 
cost. JVlrs. A. D. Ayeis. 



For Sttle. 



IJ^OU SALE— A heavy working team cheap 
X; at A. \V. Eilers 'An Lake avenue south. 



OOli SALE— My residence with uo or 100 feet 
Jj at 316 East bocoud street. Terms to suit 
pureuaoer. E. A. (iUberi, Kl Board ot T~rade. 



11 EAVV HOHsKS FOll SALE— 16 head of 
JlX. heavy hotses, ral?ed at. Lake Park, on 
Ljie Aortbern I'aeilic road, lor sale by C. W. 
L-ai vey. Can Oe seeu at llowara barn, on the 
lake shore, Minnesota point. Uesiueuce, ifiSi 
V\ Col Fourth stieel. 



Lost. 

I OS r— Part of a gold-link cuff button in 
AJ bbape ol three riugs. Lost iu Superior 
tji iJuluih. Fiuder will leceive rewai-d by 
leaving tbe same at mj olhce. itubert (i. Mc- 
iJoweu, ;li. \Veol buptiior street. 



i'or Ueut. 

Ir>UH KENT— Desirable room; 
! steam, etc.; private family, 
lleraiu ollice. 



bath, gas. 
Address S., 




$8. CO- 



Best Set 
"of Teeth. 



CULLUM, 

Painless Dentist. 
Room 1-7 406 West Superior Street. 
Fargusson Blcnb. 'mliilb 



NEW HOTEL. 



-THE 



METIIOPOLITA 



St. Paul, Minn., 

Cor. 4tli and Wasliin^ton Sts. 

the Nortu 



n anted— To Kent. 

WANTED-A furnished house for the win- 
U"r. L. J. Taussig, No. » Phoenix block. 



Uourd aud Kouuis. 



''pWO KOOMt, heated aud lighted, with 
J. board, iu a pri\ale family, H 30 per week. 



l4 Fourth avenue east. 



Fiuauclal. 

DULUTH MORTUAGK LOAN COMPANY 
loans money in any amount on furni- 
ture, pianos, boi'sos aud wagous without re- 
moval from owner's possession ; also ou ware- 
houee leceipts, bank slocks, aud any property 
ol value; uot«8 disco,, utei; partial payments 
received ana iour own time granted tor pay- 
;:'eui; uo ilelaj ; money on hand au<i furnished 
immediately alter security is appiovod. Wm. 
Uorkun, >iauager, Itoom 1», Faigusaon block, 
Dululb, Minn. 



On Cable Car 
west. Kates \ 



line. Best Tabic 
3.1 10 and I'pwards. 

W - IL B&RKEB. Manager. 



WAIITED AT ONCE! 



S2,500 Mortgage. 
$1,000 Mortgage. 
$800 Mortgage. 
$600 Mortgage. 
$200 Mortgage. 
Loans of other sizes negotiated 
twenty-four hours' notice. 

N. J.UPHAM, 

Und er First Nat. Bank, 

FIRE INSURANCE. 



on 



IF VOU WISH TXJ SELL OH BUY DULUTH 
or superior bank stock, corporaiiou or in- 
\ vstmeut securities, call on or address B. Mur- 
puiu, broker, it Banning block. Duluth. Minn. 

MISCELLANEOUS. 



^r H. WILSON, ATTORNEY ANDOOUN- 
_i.^ • sellor at Law. Will practice in State 
aun iniied States Vxjurts. All business given 
piompt attention, 44 Fargusson block, Duluth, 
Miuu. 



13LASTEK1NG. 

H, T. DINHAM, 

All kinds of plastering done, 
promptly attcuded to. Olhce, room 
ter block. 



Jobbing 
D, Hun- 



M 



KS. J. S. DINWOODIE, 



Teacher of Piano Forte, VQice and Sight Sing- 
ing. Chorus aud Choir Conductor. 



Music rooms at J. J. Wiggins's, 16 East Su 
pcrior street, and at residouco, 121 Tenth ave. B 



A/rR.H. PA&KEK ROBINSON, 
VOCAL INSTKUCTION. 



8 MTLES BLOCK. 




1 lie Hi 



FOR SALE: 

50-H--ln Icfeage, - 
48-15-ln Icfeaie 
Superior Stree! 
Dock Property - 



'3"l 



1 

- 1, 



MCMILLBN & STEBBINS, AHCHITECTS 
und superintendents. Office, room No. 

— , lixehaugo building. 

13ALMEU i HALL, AUCUITECTS AND 
. Superlntendents.room 4«, Exchange build- 
in;.-, Duluth, Mtuu. E. S. Palmer. L. P. Hall. 



THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



Strictly First-Class in all tppointments. 



DULUTH. 



MINN. 



Lots for sale as 
as $25 each. 



low 



SPECIAL lARGAIIIS. 



I 60 Acres, section 2-48- 1 6. 




" 18 
12 
" 20 
" 26 
" 28- 
«« 27 
Dodge's 



50->5 
50-16. 



50- 
50- 
50- 



16. 
15. 
15. 



320 
80 " 
160 " 
70 «' 
80 " 
80 " 
Lot 2, block 30, 
$325. 
2 Lots, block 5, West End, $1050, 

We have exclusive sale of this prop- 
erly. 



50-15. 

addition, 



LAZIER BROS., 

26 Exchange BIdg, 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 

501 Wejt Superior Street. 

J. D. &. R. 0. RAY, 

RE/IL ESTATE. 



A. FITGER &. GO'S 

Lake Superior Brewery 

Is the largest In the SUte tf MIe -sesota ou 
of the Twir CItlei 



Great French renic-dy. Or. LeDcc's pkr- 
lODic.^L PILLS, from Paris, Franco, act only on 
the generative orgsins in females and posi- 
tively cures suppression of menses (from what- 
ever cuu.«ci, and all porio'lical troubles pecu- 
liar to women. .\ sale, rettable remedy, wai> 
ranted to excite menstruation or money r«- 
funded. Should not bo used during pregnancy. 
The large prop<irtion of the ills to which ladies 
are subject Is the direct result of a disoniered 
and irreiful.ir metislruation. Robt. Stevenson 
& Co.. Chicago, 111., H. Boswarth & Co.. Mil- 
waukee, Whole ale Agt*. TJie genuine only- 
supplied by Boyoe & Totman, Sole * " ~ 
luth 



Agt«., 



c. 




uo.. 



ROOM "B." 



HUNTER BLOCK. 



B. C. QKIDLEY. i. C. MISHLKB 

GRIDLEY & MiSHLER. 

Real Estate Brokers 

Room 36, Exchange Bu'ldlng. 
List your propc rty with us at irhat It Is worth 
and we will sell It, We Invite everybody to 
call In and see ui>, and aollclt oorrespondence 



REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE OBNUIKE BAROAIMB IN 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 



and 



In dittti parts of the cltr 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 



Ail we ask Is for v . rtles t o examine our list and 

compare them rith other prices before 

buying. CaU or write. 

W. C. Sherwood &. Co., 







4 

i 



! 



i 



Lyf j'.m* 



k.i«M*l 



I 





f 



/ 



& 



I 



» ■ J A '. 



r !. • ie " 




t 



-+ 





T 




( 



-.-^^ 



1 







mmmm 



•*wr 1^ M-w-M^ 



mmi-mtmmim^ammmmii^ ic 



DUIiUTH EVEKTNG HERALD JANXTABY 25 1890. 




DUIUTH - AND - SUPERIOR - REAL - ESTATE. 



I am offering 



some very good Investments on Both Sides of the River and have 
Perfect Facilities for Showing Property to Investors. 



^ 




[ 




ERTY 







So that parties listing property for sale with me may rely upon earnest work on 

my part to dispose of their Property to their Interest. 






OFFICES: ROOM 35, FARGUSSON BUILDING, DULUTH. OPPOSITE EUCLID HOTEL, SUPERIOR. 



TH[TRE NtRfiING HOME. 



The Two Young Women Who 

Have Been Flying Around 

the Earth. 



Nellie BIy's Struggles 
Work in the Literary 
World. 



for 



every dollar she possessed. This 
misfortune did not discounige her, 
and she was too proud to make her loss 
known. Every day she walked six to 
eight miles to save car fare. The situa- 
tion began to look desperate. Some- 
thing had to be done; so, without much 
hope of success, letters of introduction 
were obtained to every editor in New 
York. After the exercise of patient \>eT- 
severance, interviews were obtained with 
the editors of The Herald, Sun, Times 
and Tribune. Not one of them believed 
that Nellie Bly would be protitable. 

Then the young woman, who refused 
to be lUsheartened, betook herself to 
The World and secured an audience 
with Joseph Pulitzer. It took him fif- 
teen minutes to make up his mind that 
Nellie Bly might be made useful. He 
engaged her, and she waa directed to 
visit the department for the insane on 
Blackwells island, ostensibly as a patient, 
and describe its workings thoroughly. 
These instructions resulted in one of the 
most remarkable stories of its kind ever 
printed. 

For three days she rehearsed her part. 

She bought books on insanity and studied 

carefully all its phases. She stood in front 

of a mirror with disheveled hair, and prac- 

. ( ticed rolling her eyes and contorting her 

■NellieBly,"probablythe hrst to reach jgg^^i.gg^jj^ij ajjg knew her part. It 

home of the two young women who are ^ad been agreetl that she should remain 
now'^utting a girdle 'round about the) in the asylum for six days. With the 



in seventy-two days. 
Elizabeth Cochrane. 



Her real name is 



Elizabeth 
Many 



Bisland 
Successes on a 
Monthly. 



Scored 



earth," is a Pittsburg girl. She has been 
engaged in writing for newspapers a 
little more than three years. Her first 
attempt to gain a livelihood with her pen 
was made in 188G on The Pittsburg Dis- 
patch. She had written a oommunica- 
tion to that journal on the condition of 
the workingwomen in the city, and there 
was so much original thought in it that 
she was re'iuested to send her name to 
the editor. As a result she was engaged 
to follow up several of the suggestions 
she had made. 

Her first important mission was a trip 
to Mexico, where she traveled for six 
months, learning to speak Spanish with 
fair tluency in that time. W hen Miss 
Bly returned to Pittsburg she was put 
in charge of the society column of The 
Dispatch, alternating this work with 
writing theatrical notices and criti- 
cisms, and in articles on woman's 
work. Itching for a larger field 
she received letters of introduction 
to New York newspaper men and started 
for* the city. Arrived there she pre- 
sented her letters and was given several 
large chunks of fatherly advice and the 
cheerful opinion that she had made a 
big mistake and <JUght to go home. 

She didn't go, but sought out the 
managing editor of The Mail and Lx- 
prese. It was just at this time that 
Andrew Carnegie had taken unto him^ 
self a bride, and it was intimated that if 
Miss Bly could interview Mrs. Carnegie 
such service might be acceptable. Small 
hope was held out that success would 
attend this effort, as the most experi- 
enced New York interviewers had tried 
it and failed. By perseverance and the 
exercise of a little feminine diplomacy 
she obtained an exhaustive talk with 
the bride, touching upon every subject 

of interest. 

Like all beginners in newspaper work 
in the big city. Miss Bly speedily reached 
that period when it appeared that there 
was not a single new thing under the eun 
to write about. She thought and 
thought, and tried and tried, but met 
rebuffs. She was boarding at a mo<lest 
little boarding house way up in Harlem, 
where the fare was just about generous 
enough to support life. Cheap as this 
living was, it could not be paid for with- 
out an income. The little store of money 
the girl had hoarde<l was exhausted. To 
make matters worse she one day 
lost her purse, and with it 



glare of insanity in her eyes she wim- 
dered into a police station, too much de- 
mented to give anything more than her 
name— Nellie Brown. Justice Duffy 
committed her to Blackwell's island, 
and on the following day the newspapers 
contained accounts of the mysterious 
young woman who had been found wan- 
dering in the streets with reason de- 
throned. Dr. Field, one of the most 
eminent scientists in the country, pro- 
nounced her "hopelessly insane." On 
the tifth day the patient made a narrow 
escape from discover)-. Standing in her 
ward looking at her was a Pittsburg 
newspaper man who had known her 
well. The recognition was mutual. He 
was just on the point of making 
the girl's identity known when she, 
divining his purpose, got close to him 
and whispered: "Don't betray me; wil 
explain later." The visitor understood 
the situation in a moment, and kept 

quiet. « . , . ,, . , . 

Nellie Brown remained in the institu- 
tion f<jr thirteen days. She thought she 
had been forgotten, and began to be- 
lieve that she was doomed to remam for- 
ever in the world of lunatics. Relief 
came at last, and then the story of her 
experiences, which set the town by the 
ears and created consternation among 
tlie officers of the asylum. 

Her next important work was the ex- 
posure of Phelps, the Albany lobbyist. 
She drove this briber of legislators out 
of the state, and so revengeful was he 
that he employed detectives to shadow 
the bold writer and learn who she was. 
Following this came the showing up of 
a notorious libertine named Cleveland, 
who lured ajuntry girls to disreputable 
resorts and ruined them. Central Park 
was his stamping ground. The exposure 
was thorough and complete and Cleve- 
land lied from New York. 

She is not what may be called a grace- 
ful writer. At times she is given to ver- 
bosity. Her ideas are for* the most part 
original, and she has never yet failed in 
an undertaking. The name "Nellie Bly" 
is never used except as a signature. 
About ten young women in different 
parts of the country have claimed to be 
the simon-pure Jiellie Bly, and have 
gained a temporary notoriety. Nellie 
Bly is just now about ending her jour- 
ney at New York. She has been via 
Havre, Suez, Aden, Bombay, Singap^jre, 
Yokahama and San Francisco. She has 
been on the go since Nov. 14. and has 
made the circuit of the world therefore | 



Elizabeth Bisland, the other venture- 
some globe trotter, is a clever girl from 
New Orleaus, in whose veins runs some 
of the best blood of our country and 
whose marked literary talent has already 
won for her a recognized position amongst 
the American women of letters. Start- 
ing at an hour's notice from The Cosmo- 
p<jlitan Magazine, with which handsome 
publication she has for some time been 
associated, the plucky girl never stopped 
to inquire into the editorial why or where- 
fore, nor did she wait until six Saratoga 
trunks could be packed and strapi)ed, 
but with merely a tiny box that could 
be easilv stowed away in carriage or 
cabin, M^ss Bisland undertook this tour 
of the world, flying to the West, expect- 
ing to pass her rival somewhere in the 
antipodes. 

Outside of the circle of literature Miss 
Bisland has not been much talked of. 
She i.s, as above stated, of New Orleans, 
of an old family ruined by the illfort- 
unes of the war. She is as noted for 
her beauty as for her literary attain- 
ments. Although much of her life was 
spent on a plantation, she has all the 
energy and talent found among New 
York women. On The Cosmopolitan 
Magazine Miss Bisland has scored many 
successes as a book reviewer, and in ad- 
dition to this work she has contributed 
to the magazine a series of articles on 
"Life in New York," "The OnteoraClub.^^ 
"Tuxedo," "Co-operative Housekeeping, ' 
"The Flower Market of New York," and 
in the last number of the magazine had 
a beautifully-Illustrated article on 
"Famous Beauties." She lives in a little 
home which is daintily arranged in its 
interior. When she began her trip 
around the world it was understood that 
she was to be employed regularly after- 
wards by The Cosmopolitan Magazine. 
Being still quite young and a beginner, 
she may be said to enter on a literary 
career with bright prospects 



land left on the New York Central at 6 
o'clock in the evening. To make the 
trip in seventy-two days Miss Bly must 
arrive at the New York railway station 
at 10:40 tomorrow morning. Miss Bis- 
land will have to arrive at her vessel's 
landing at o'clock tomorrow evening. 
It is difficult to see how she can ikw- 
siblv get home before Tuesday, which 
would make the journey seventy-five 
days. Had she caught the Champagne 
a week ago today she would have made 
it all right. Nellie Bly reached 'Frisco 
Monday and started at once across the 
continent on the Southern Pacific road. 
When the trip was planned it was in- 
tended she should come overland on the 
Central Pacific, and it was arranged to 
bring her across in four and one-half 
days. Snow blockades have interfered 
with the plan and it will take five and 
one-half days. 



A PRETTY STORY. 



Irv- 



A New but True Tale of Washington 
ing, Ainerifa's Koiiiaufer. 

I heard recently a verj- pleasing anec- 
dote of the life of Washington Irving, 
one that has never before been pub- 

Irving had left New York to spend the 
summer at his place on the Hudson. 
Adjoining his grounds was the farm of a 
wealthy metropt)litan merchant, whose 
' head gardener was an old Scotchman. 
While out strolling one morning, enjoy- 
ing the fresh and early air, Irving met 
the son of Scosia, and engaged him in 
conversation. The subject, as 
would be expected, turned on liter- 
ature and Walte'r Scott. The Scotchma:^ 
maintained that Scott was the greatest 
novelist Europe had seen. In this Irving 
agreed, and to the Scotchman's great 
delight began quoting from the great 
author's works. At the end of a thrilling 
description the gardener interrui)tedand 
said: 

"Weel, mon, there's nae but one who 
can equal Scott." 

"And whom may that be?" asked the 



She succeededadmirably with her trip. , ^^^^^-^^"0/0^ "Alhambra." 

until Europe was reached from the ii.a8t, I ;. jiving," came the answer 

going from Chicago to 'Frisco on the 

first trip of the new fast mail. There ill 

luck Ijegan, and but for it she would this 

morning have been in New York, at 

home among friends, beating Nellie Bly 

by a day or two. Misinformed about 

her chances for catching the swift French 

racer Chami)agne at Havre, the first of 

this week, she determined to push on 

jind catch the swift -sailing Ems at South- 
ampton. This was an unluckly venture, 

l>ecause by it she lost the French boat, 

only to find that the Ems had been taken 

off for the winter about three weeks be- 
fore. Then she pushed on, hoping to get 

the greyhound Cunarder Etruria by 

hurraing across the Irish sea and going to 

Queenstown. This hope was broken 

when she got to Queenstown and found 

that the Etruria had been taken off and 

the slow going Bothnia had taken her 

place. There was nothing to do but take 
the Bothnia. , , , 

Even the Bothnia was delayed several 
hours at Queenstown last Sunday after- 
noon, which reduces her chances that 
much. On top of these annoyances and 
delays are the high winds and heavy seas 
now troubling trans- Atlantic steamships. 
Miss Bisland is therefore out on the 
ocean in a boat whose record is ten days 
for crossing, and is likely to be delayed 
by storms. Her route has been as fol- 
lows: New York t»> San Francisco, Yoko- 
hama, Bombay, Brindisi, Paris, Calais, 
Dover, London, Liverpool and New lork 
again. 

The two young women left New York 
Nov. 14, and the scheduled time for 
their trips was seventy -five days. The 
vessel on which Miss Bly sailed left her 
pier at 10:40 in the morning. Miss Bis- 



canned corn far in excess of require- 
ments. 

Although there was a shrinkage in the 
pack, the market does not improve. 
Prices have ranged from 45 cents to 
§1.40 per dozen, there being great irreg- 
ularity in (luality and quotations. Maine 
is the banner state, having put up 505,- 
:{6'2 castas; Maryland, :i78,l(>l cases; New 
York, 272.1)"25 cases; the Western states, 
4i)5,800 cases, and all other states and 
Canada, 108,109 cases. The outlook is 
discouraging for the packers, except for 
those who put up a first-class article. 
The protluction of canned goods keeps 
in advance of the demand, owing to the 
rapid extension of the industry through- 
out the Union. 

A Cure for Diptheria. 

Scientific American: The following 
remedy is said to be the best known, at 
least it is worth trying, for physicians 
seem powerless to cope with the disease 
successfully. At the first indication of 
diphtheria in the throat of a child make 
the room close; then take a tin cup and 
pour into it a quantity of tar and tur- 
pentine, e(iual parts. Then hold the cup 
over a fire so as to fill the room with 
fumes. The little patient, on inhaling 
the fumes, will cough up and spit out 
all the membranous matter, and the 
diphtheria will pass off. The fumes of 
the tar and turpentine loosens the mat 
ter in the throat, and thus affords the 
relief that has battled the skill of physi- 
cians. ^ 

At a Kough Estimate. 

Puck: First passenger (standing in 
car)— I'm going to make that man move 
up and give me half of his seat. ^ 

Second passenger (io slow, that s old 
Si>ecie. Do you know what that man is 
worth? 

First pjissenger -If iK)rk is eight cents 
a pound live weight I should think he 
ought to be worth $16 easy en ough. 

A Wine PrecBuTi 
Harper's Bazar: Mr. Williams— Wha' 
vo' doin' dat fo'. 



SPECIAL 



umm 



C. L. M:VEAN 



160 Acres in 9-49-15. 



80 

40 

320 

80 
48-15. 



II 



II 



1 1 



(I 



8-49-15. 
1-49-15. 
35-48-15. 
Water Front, 




Irving 
was (rf course surprised, and at once 
opened an argument as to the rela- 
tive merits of the two, and to prove that 
Scott was the lietler quoted beauti 
fill extracts from his novels and 
poems. But the Scotchman was not 
to be daunted, and he met Irving's quo- 
tations by repeating pa-ssages from the 
American's works. The gardener showed 
a wonderful knowledge of Irving's books, 
and at last gained a victory by absolutely 
tiring Irving out. During all that sum- 
mer the author and gardener would 
meet, the latter never knowing to whom 
he was speaking. 

At last they parted. One day the 
Scotchman was overwhelmed with as- 
ttmishment and delight to receive a com- 
plete set of Irving's works, with a long 
letter from the author expressing thanks 
for his g(X)d opinion and for the sum- 
mer's pleasure. But even here the 
Scotian was not to be braved, but pur- 
chased from his hard-earned savings a set 
of Scott's works, and sent them with his 
compliments to Irving. Through this a 
friendship sprang up, that only ended 
with Irving's death. J- S. 

THE ANNUAL CORN PACK. 

A Summary of the .\iinual Report of the 
Corn I'ack. 

From the annual review of the Ameri- 
can Grocer published this week it ap- 
pears that the quantity of sweet corn 
put up in the United States in 1889 was 
l,700,:300catesof two dozen tins each, 
against 3,491,474 cases in 1888, a decrease 
of 1,7:U,174 cases, or nearly forty-four 
per cent. The industryjis overdone, and 
the production of low grade and medium 



ion. 

Mr. Williams 
Mr. Jo'son -puttin' 
mosquito nets up dis time in de year? 

Mr. Johnson— Waal, yo' see the doctor 
tole m© de air war full of dese yer grip 
microbees, so I's takin' precotions ag m 
gitten' 'em into de house. 

Why the Muear Goes. 

Jones— I never saw anything go like 
the sugar in this house. Four pounds 
in six weeks! It's awful! How do you J 
account for it? 

Mrs. Jones— I don't know unless the 
grocer puts quicksa nd in it. 

WINTER QUIP8. 



2 Grand Avenue lots. 

2 Lots on Central Avenue. 

I Cottage House, with 
v»^ell, West Duluth, $1750. 

I Cottage House, with 
well. West Duluth, $ I I 80. 

" I Cottage House, with 
well. West Duluth, $2000. 



C. L. McVEAN & CO., 



Merchant Tailors, 



Have opened a first-class Merchant Tailoring Establishment 

in the 



SPALDING HOUSE, 



' 


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i 


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t 

i 


• 


1 

1 
« 

i 

i 

1 

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: 



k 



Kn Koiite. 

LTime. ! ' 

You heiir the sweet, f»int echo of a kiss, 

LIki- the K'lrtfle of the water In a funD*";. 
AiKl you realize tlmt some one s tasttxi I>ll88 
In the iflooni and lasting darlinoss of the 

tunnel. 

Th« Ulary. 

I Judge.] 

Ne'er strive your inmost thoughts to write. 

You'll find it's Init to woo grief ; 
And tliis is why each wretched wight 
Has ne'er turned o'er a new leaf. 

A Country Tragedy. 

LTime.] 
A tree that spans a. tiny stream, 

A maiden fair and rash; 
She tries U) cross -a sudden seroam— 

A Bomorsault— a splash ! 

It I» All the Same to Him. 

[Boston fv'ourier. J 
Whether the play is l)rlglit or flat 

To him is never linown , ^ , . . 
Who loolis at tlie hack of a lady 8 hat 

And swears as the acts go on. 

At Our Boarding Houne. 

lEiMwh.l 
"It neodcd not, madame, this day's report 
From far Brazilisn sliores." said 1, much 
nettled, . , , ,, 

"To tell the btmrders of this vile resort 
That c(.ffc«!'8 ratlier weak and still unset- 
tled." 



Terms on Houses, U Cash, Balance 
1,2 and SKearsatB Per Cent. 



Their stock is composed of the latest novelties in SUIT- 
INGS, OVERCOATINGS and PANTINGS that are to be found 
In a f rst-class Tailoring Establishment. They carry a complete 
line of SCOTCH, ENGLISH, IRISH, GERMAN, FRENCH and 
DOMESTIC WOOLENS, made up at reasonable prices. 



H. P. MILLS, 



411 AIID 411 RRSI NAIIOIIIiL BANK BUILDING. 



CliLL AIID [XAMINE GOODS AND PRICES. 



C. L. McVEAN Sl CO. 



] 



I i «».■ . « i i( 



- — f 



r*^ ii J- Kt. i 



■■■ ^ ■ 1" 






a Jjj. I- rw 



I I. B>n»«i 



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1 



DUIilTTH ILV^EiNTKrG HERAIiD: JAXUAKY 25, 1890. 



STARTS ft NEW 0[ftL. 



The Arizona Kicker Now 
Authority Game 
Column. 



Has 



an 



An 



Editor's Misplaced Obitu- 
ary; Short Notes of 

Smiles. " 



We extract the following from the last 
insue of The Arizona Kicker: 

Always in the Liead — Last week we es- 
tablished a new department in The 
Kicker — that of answering questions 
concerning disputed pointi« on games of 
chance, as well as making decisions 
thereon. These games will include 
euchre, old eledge, seven -up, pedro, 
whist, keno, faro, roulette, eta, taking, 
in fact, each and ever>- game known to 
the sporting world. 

This department will be edited by an 
old gambler of thirty years' experience, 
and who carries seven knife wounds and 
the scars of four bullets as proofs of his 
literary caJibre. 

The fact that such a department hit 
the liuU's-eye is evidenced by the fact 
that we have added twenty -one new 
sub8cril)er8 within a week, and they are 
still coming. We were intending to de- 
vote itiis space to religious news, but 
after looking the ground over and dis- 
covering that there was none to chroa- 
icle, we gave way to the urgent demands 
of the boys ami institutes! the new de- 
parture. It is the general belief that 
this will do more to bbom our town than 
if we had secured ^\(.XX) for a new gov- 
ernment building. All communications 
for this department should be addressed: 
'tiambling Department of The Kicker." 
Write only on one side ot the paper, and 
do not attempt to write with blood. 

A tireat Improvement -Col. Obediah 
Caw, our popular register of deeds, has 
presented us with a new 38-calibre re- 
volver of Smith ,lt Wesson make, as a 
token of his esteem and atTection, and 
we feel as proud as a \yo\ with his tirst 
pair of boots. 

We have been, as some of our friends 
know, greatly hampereil in our editorial 
work iluring the past year by an old- 
fashioned revolver which could never be 
dej)ende«l on in an emergency. It was 
out of repair all along the line, and when 
we brought it down on a man we never 
felt sure which of us would get the con- 
tentjK.- It was also too large for our pis- 
tol pocket, and on three or four occa- 
sions the other man had opene*! tire be 
fore we could get it out. When Arkan- 
sas Bill met us in front of Taylor's 
bank one day la^st summer ' and 
opened tire he had pulled 
the trigger three times before 
we c<^)uld get our old shooting iron on 
line with his left lung. We didn't much 
ex{>ect to drop him then, as the hammer 
was out of true, but when we pulled he 
tumbled, and he lived long enough to 
tell us that he made the mistake of his 
life when he set out to remove the edi- 
torial head of Arizona's great weekly 
newtipaper. 

This new weapon adds to our editorial 
zeal and enterprise, and puts The Kicker 
on a more certain foundation. We have 
had only one week's practice, and yet we 
can draw it and send two bullets ripping 
through a fellow- t>eing's carcass while an 
average schtxdixiy oan get his -mouth 
puckered to begin the tirst line of Henry 
Clay's great s^>eech. We shall not be 
satistietl until we have done a little better 
than that— live seconds better. Mean- 
while, anyone hankering for our scalp 
can find us at the usual place, prepared 
to do the best we can under the circum- 
stances. 

It Resulted. — We were bom with a 
spirit of fair play in our composition 
which has never grown less. We want 
to see every botly and everjthing have a 
fair show . For this rea«.)n, when half a 
dozen of our prominent citizens came to 
oue day last week, and sug- 



and known you will kneel by your last 
resting place in the solemn twilight, and 
their tears will tell heaven how they 
miss you. 

Later— Our information concerning 
the death of Mr. Sebastopol was wrong. 
He is alive and enjoying excellent health. 
We hope that George will at once call at 
this office and pay the 83 due us en sub- 
scription. His account hsis been running 
for two years, and as we are greatly in 
need of money he will oblige us by mak- 
ing a prompt remittance. 

THE LAST QALLUS BUTTON. 

[Chicago Herald.) 
"Tls tlie last "villus button 

Left huiitrinif aluiie; 
Its erstwhile companions 

Have every one troiie. 
Tliey frtiiiMi like snowHakes 

At summer's advance: 
Tliey weren't sadly stuck on 

My hand-me-ilown pants. 



They olinfr while at homo 

Like a wriiujfht-iri)u cleat. 
Kut tliey'U all tiinit>le off 

When you go on the street. 
They stem to take pleasure 

In humbling the proud. 
For they always guit work 

In thp midst of the crowd. 

.\nd .so I've decided 

Henceforth to dis<-ard 
With buttons which no one's 

Surrouudiujrs rejrard. 
I'll lollow ilic style 

Whicli in Kausas prevails. 
And use in their stead 

Some secure shingle nails. 



FOR FftIR READERS. 



Matters of Interest to The 

Herald's Many Feminine 

Readers. 



How to Keep in Style; A Pe- 
culiar Party; The Model 
Wife. 



The Kditor's .\ppeaL 
Boxeman Appeal: .\n editor who had 
been pounding away at his delinquent 
subscribers for some time tinally brought 
them to their sense of duty with the fol 
lowing jwetical parody: 

"Lives of po<ir men oft remind us 
honest toil don't stand a chance; more we 
work we leave beiiind us bigger patches 
on our pants. On our pants once new 
and glossy now are patches of ditTerent 
hue; all because subscribers linger and 
won't pay up what is due. Then let 
all lie up and doing; send in your mite 
be it so small, or when the snows of win- 
ter strike us we shall have no pants at 
all." 



A NEW TORPEDO. 



From 



Great Things Wlileh .\re E-ipei-ted 
Herresliort's Torpedo. 

Great things are expected of the new 
torpedo boat now being completed by 
Mr. Herreshoff, the blind shipbuilder, 
for the United States government. The 
contract calls for a ma.ximum speed of 
twenty two knots an hour, but the pre- 
mium on all fractions of knots in excess 
of this tigure is so high that the build- 
ers have put their best endeavors into 
the new boat, and it is expected she will 
do something wonderful in the way of 
going through the water. Some idea of 
the power of the new boat may be got- 
ten from figures as to the ratio of power 
to displacement: The ocean grey-hound, 
City of Paris, has a displacement of 
lO.lXX) tons with a horse-power of IG.OOO, 
a ratio of l.G to 1. The displacement of 
the torpedo boat, loaded, is -09 tons, 
while her maximum horse power is 1600, 
or lij to 1. It is gratifying that the 
name of the new boat is to be William 
B. Pushing, after the brave Wisconsin 
boy who blew up the rebel ram Albe- 
marle with a torpedo attached to a pole 
projecting f i om the bow of a small steam 
launch. 



us 

gested a necktie party to remove 
-Cowboy Jack." as he calls himself, 
from ins sphere on earth to one 
a great deal higher up, we suggested that 
he tirst IX' given a show to intiict his 
presence on the jieople of Tombstone or 
Tucson He had been with us three 
weeks, terrorizing old men, women anc> 
boys by his wild shooting and being too 
ready with his pop when a dispute arose 
in a saloon. The aaeertion of our lop- 
eared contemporary that we wanted to 
save him until he had subscribed for The 
Kicker is a declaration worthy of Satan 
himself. 

It was suggested that we call upon 
the gentleman named within the quota- 
tion marks, and throw out a hint that 
he had i>etter walk. We did so. He 
received us with chilling politeness, 
listened to our wortls of wiaJom, and 
then gave us thirteen seconds to get 
down three pairs of stairs. As he 
had the drop on us. we got; and as he 
didn't shoot, it is likely that we saved a 
seomd or two. We warned him what 
the result would be. and the result has 
resultetl. On Tuesilay night a score or 
more of us leading citizens made a call 
on Cowb«>y Jack. He was somewhat 
8uri)ri8ed, but would have done well 
enough had he been given time. He was 
taken from the O. K. saloon to Hang- 
man's tree, given the usual time to un- 
dergo a change of heart, and then hauled 
up and left to his reflections. We spoke 
to him personally just before he was 
liftetl, referring to our former conversa- 
tion, and It pleased us to hear him reply 
that we were dead right in our de<luc- 
tione, and that if he had his life to live 
over again he would subeiribe for The 
Kicker and pay at least two years in 
advance. 

AN e'dITOR'S slight MISTAKE 



The Girl Who lliuttt. 

Ladies Home Journal: Naturally you 
didn't ask him, and you would be' very 
indignant indeed if anybody suggested 
that you had forced the \ioot fellow into 
bringing you the flowers, candy, or m 
taking you to the concert. No, you 
didn't ask him, but you couldn't have 
been any clearer about it than you were 
when you hnsked into his eyes in your 
most beseeching way and told him how- 
anxious you were to hear the great 
violinist; how sweet you thought violets, 
and how you did wish for a ptmnd of 
chocolate. He didn't want to get any of 
these, he hadn't the money to spend 
for them; he doesn't get a %'ery large 
salary, he is trying to keep himself out 
of debt, and yet because he is generous 
and can't resist a pretty girl, you have 
forced him into a dishonest position. 
That's it in plain English. When the 
end of the week comes and he is 810 short 
in his money, a little bit on his board bill 
must wait, his laundress cannot be at- 
tended to. and the money that shou^ go 
home must be apologized for. This is 
the tirst step toward not doing his duty, 
and you have made him take it. The 
American man is generous, and when he 
has the money he ^11 invite >oa him- 
self without your suggesting to him 
w hat you like, or what you think he 
ought to do. Besides the" harm you do 
him, you are making yourself vulgar- 
he has a perfect right to go away and 
say that he dt)esn't want to visit at your 
house any more, because you hint and 
hint until he has to take you to some 
place of amusement, or make you 
presents and that, for his part 
he cannot afford it. Continue as 
you are doing and after while you will 
get the reputation among men of being 
a very undesirable girl to know, and 
certainly no man who has heard of your 
reputation to "get things out of men" 
will want to ask you to be his wife. 
Better stay at home forever than go 
self-invited; better never taste candy 
than eat that obtained at the high cost 
of self-respect; better never smell a 
violet, or a rose than forget, in your 
search for them, that it is the modesty 
of the violet and the dignity of the rose 
that makee them pre-eminent among 
the flowers. 



The opera mantle now is of richest 
white satin, smocked on the shoulders 
and below the waist, and trimmed with 
the fashionable mouffon fur. 

A new color combination is gold-yellow 
with pigeon-gray. These colors are 
mostly placed together in different stuffs, 
cloth and velvet being at present the fa- 
vorite combination. 

A fan of goose feathers looks better 
than it sounds. Snow-white feathers 
with the natural quills replaced by the 
staves of the fan are arranged gracefully 
together and only the outside shows the 
complete feather. Each feather has a 
dainty border of flowers painted on it, in 
colors true tj nature. .V bow of ribbon 
adorns the handle. 

A man milliner of London has just 
designed for Sarah Bernhardt a gown of 
lemon-colored silk with a touch of brill- 
iant green. It hna no pad, no steel, no 
facings of startched muslin and lace, not 
even n hem in the skirt— nothing but 
softly flowing, clinging folds, with only a 
selvetlge at tlie bottom. 

Gray is one of the most popular colors 
of the seascm, both f"r plain and dressy 
toilets. 

Dark dresses are made attrastive and 
bright by the introtluction of full fronts 
of some light colored surah or crejie, 
forming part of the bodice, or by having 
their jacket fronts fasten at the throat 
and waist over a fuUchimisetteof bright 
crepe. 

The round pelerine, with one or many 
fapes, takes an imporUint place in the 
fashions of today. It is worn on almost 
everj occasion, whether in or out-of- 
dtxjra Six capes is the popular number. 
Zouave bodices in a variety of styles 
are fashionable Ixith for day and even- 
intr wear, and are very simple in make, 
require no especial skill in fitting, and 
shoultl therefore be regardetl as a boon 
to the amateur dressmaker. 

The wedding dress is made as ."dimply 
as [lossUjle, and with a very l<ing train, 
arid orange blossoms are applied spar- 
ingly, while all other flowers, including 
even myrtle, are tabooed entirely by 
Parisian fancy. 

Since afternoon "at homes" are given 
by gaslight, very smart little dresses are 
worn usually of some bright shade of 
color. 

Silver gray velvet and sable is an ex- 
quisite combination, and one warranted 
not to become at all common. 

A lady with good taste and much 
money recently ordered a set of night 
dresses made exactly like a baby's first 
slips — the neck gathered int<} a little 
yoke, the sleeves with a tiny upturned 
cuff, and a sash of the same material 
about the waist. The materials were to 
be the finest cambric and silk, and the 
trimming only the finest and daintiest 
of needlework. 



Who keeps her sweetest smiles and 
most loving words for her husband. 

Who is his confidant in sorrow or in 
joy, and who doee not feel the necessity 
of explaining her private affairs to the 
neighborhood. 

Who respects the rights of husband 
and children, and in return has due re- 
gard paid to her. 

Who knows that the strongest argu- 
ment is her womanliness, and so she 
cultivates it. 

W^ho is sympathetic^ in joy or in grief, 
and who finds work for her hands to do. 

W^ho makes friends and keeps them. 

Who is not made bitter by trouble, 
but who strengthens and sweetens 
under it. 

W'ho tries to conceal the faults of her 
husband rather than blazon them forth 
to an iminterested public. 

The woman whose life-book has love 
written on every page. 

Who makes a home for a man — a 
home in a house and in a heart. A home 
that he is sure of, a home that is full of 
love presided over by one whose price is 
above rubies. 

She is the model wife. 



THE COO KING SCHOOL. 

Many Llltle Maitis I'ntier Charge of Miss 
French at the Bethel. 

To be a good cook is a very laudable 
ambition. There are fifteen or twenty 
very young women of Duluth who pos- 
sess a desire to acquire this very i^seful 
accomi)lisliment. These are piij^ of 
Miss French w ho has been instructing 
the girls in the art of cookery for dK>me 
weeks past. The lady had just JlSfived 
the appointment of teacher of ctioking 
in the public schools, a new departure 
in education, but certainly a desirable 
one! 

Miss French is an enthusiast in the 
art of cuisine. She qualified herself as 
an instructor in the Boston Normal 
Training school and teaches the art 
from a scientific basis. She assigns 
a new subject for each lesson. Yester- 
day was "meat day," and a Herald re- 
IKjrter was admitted into the kitchen and 
allowed to see how the little girls pre- 
pare this article of diet. Each of the 
girls is attired in a spotless white apron, 
with jaunty little cap. A towel is con- 
veniently attached to the side of the 
apron, and other kitchen paraphernalia 
arranged al)out the belt. Each girl had 
a small portion of beef on a chopping 
block which she was scraping assidu- 
ously, for the purpose of preparing 
smothered beef. While this was going 
on the teacher was giving necessary 
hints which the children followed 
out to the letter. There was no 
levity, all were deeply intent upon 
their work, which they evidently re- 
garded as very serious business. The 
teacher wcmld ask questions as to the 
amount of pepper, salt or water to be 
used, which was answered with great 
pn^mptitude, only a little difficulty being 
experienced occasionally as t<^> whether a 
teaspoon or tablespoon was meant. By 
the time these little ladies have gone 
through the course, which consists of 
twenty lessons, and comprises instruc- 
tion in the jireparation of as many arti- 
cles of food, there is no doubt but they 
will be able to give their mothers much 
useful assistance in preparing food and 
many valuable pointers in the construc- 
tion of edibles, thei-onsumption of which 
will not require the digestion cf an 
ostrich. 



BHYME OF m GOflSt 



An Old Lady, a Stranger and a 

Goose Constitute the 

Subject ot a 



Little Story, Which, if you Have 

the Leisure, You Might 

Read. 



Whether True or False We Cannot Say; At 
Rate, Some Useful Lessons May be 
Qathered Therefrom. 



any 



' 1 knew an old wife, lean and poor. 
Her rasrs scarce held together; 
There stn>de a stianjrer to the door. 
And it was windy weather. 

He held a froose upon his arm. 
He utU'r'd rliynie and reason: 

'Here, take the jfoose and keep you warm; 
It is a stormy season.' 

She caught the white goose by the leg: 
A goose— 'twas no great matter; 

The goose let fall a golden egg 
With cackle and with clatter. 

She dropt the goose and caught the pelf. 
And ran to tell lior neighbors: 

And IjJess'd herself, and cursed herself. 
And rested from her labors." 

— Tennveon. 

Our readers may possibly 
think that ihe foregoing poem 
is rather farfetched. But after 
all, when rightly considered, it 
contains some food for reflec- 
tion. There are a great many 
people who have a hard strug- 
gle in life, and often when 
everything seems darkest and 
the surroundings are the most 
discouraging, they are nearest 
port. It is an old saying that 
"The darkest hour is just be- 
fore day." This old lady in 
the rhyme saw an opportunity 
and she didn^t wait to ask how 
old the goose was; whether it 
was fat or lean; or whether, on 
the whole, she had better ac- 
cent or decline. She took it 
"too quick," and in .seizing the 
tirst good piece of fortune in- 
stanter, another and a greater 
one immediately followed. In 
acquiring a competence, the 
tirst thousand dollars is gener- 
ally the most difficult to ac- 
quire. Many times people 
work long and hard and have 
to practice rigid econom}- to 
get a itart, and then get into 



HARWOOD'S 

Cit( Transportation Freight and Express, 

DRAYS. 

Office, 17 First Avenue West. 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFrCE 

17 First Avenue West. 



SCHILLING'S ORCHESTRA 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 



BOOM 41* PmOREI-SIEHSOU BLOCK, 

DULUTH, . - MINN. 



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First class in every way. wewly r 
Finest sample room In town. Livery In 
eonnectton. "'" ■ ■*-■ "— - 



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In town. Livery i 
WILI lAM GRANT, Prop. 

Open November I. 



GREAT ENGLISH REMEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 



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V0U8 disease such as Weak 
Memory, Loss Brain Power. 

Hysteria. Headache, Pain in the 
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Roirt In Dninth by M»z Wlrth 





A SPOOK SURPRISE PARTY. 



A I>oe Party. 

Syracuse Standard: At a ball given 
in New York the other niyht not a man 
was present. There joined in the fes- 
tivities, nevertheless, 1201.) young women, 
who are reported to have frolicked and 
danced with a greater degree of gusto 
than was ever witnessed at a mixed as- 
sembly. In order to keep the level of 
equality which is preserved among men 
when they go out for a uight of similar 
dissipation, all the women at this ball 
went in dresses as nearly alike as could 
be buggested, and each was bound to 
conceal from view any trinkets or gew- 
gaws suggestive of better circumstances 
than her sisters were in. The conspicu- 
ous feature of the ball was that there 
was not a wall-tlower on the dancing 
floor, especial attention being given by 
the managers tti providing partners for 
everybody. The diversions consisted of 
round and square dances, and though 
the piirticipants entered into them with 
absiilute abondon, it can hardly be said 
that the romping was subject to criti- 
cism from the standpoint of D^orality. 
Whether it would have given the young 
women more pleasure to have shared 
with their pantelooned friends the fun 
of the night is not recorded, but the ex- 
periment may well be pointed to as il- 
lustrating in a new fashion the inde- 
pendence of the sex. 



THE KNIGHT. 



An Obituary From Wiiirli the Kd|;e wait 
I'ofortanatelf Taken. 

^*Our heart is heavy today," wrote the 
editor of The Purple Springs Enunci- 
ator. "t ieorge J. Sebastopol, whom we 
have long known and admired, is dead. 
In the rtush and glory of his manhood, 
when the future .seemed as resplendent 
as an angel's dream, the rain of death 
came sobbing to the doorway of his 
brilliant career, and the phantom boat- 
man ferried him acroee the black river. 
Poor l^eorge! This day there will be 
weeping in the little home on the hill, 
where the gray-haired mother kisses the 
brow of her lost one; where a weeping 
wife bends over the still form and fondles 
the dear hands that were wont to lov- 
ingly caress her; where beautiful child- 
ren tr> in vain to i*oax from the dumb 
lips a loving word— from whence 
loving words were as a river. It 
IB hard that the misty twilight of 
death should so soon blot out the 
golden glow of the morning; it is hard 
that the anthem should be broken by a 
sob that vhe dirge may be commenced; 
it is hard that the dead blades of the 
grave grass should tjuiver over feet that 
should for years press the green verdure 
of the summer. Poor George! Gener- 
ous, noble and honest; charitable, affec- 
tionate and true; a sunbeam in the 
gloom of humanity; a beacon gleaming 
in the Ui*'ckne88 of the world. Not 
alone wilT your wife and mother weep 
over your grave; scores who have loved 



Will C'arleton'M First Foeiu. 
Will Carleton in Ladies Home Journal: 
What may really be called my tirst 
poetic effort •.. as written at 10 years of 
age, ano was a letter written in" rhyme. 
My older .sister was at boarding school; 
she had written for some of the papers 
and magazines, both in prose and poetry 
and I thought I would show her that 
she had not carried away with her all the 
afflatus of the family. I heard of a 
neighboring young man who could write 
letters in rhyms, and so I thought I 
would undertake the same feat. I did 
up everything at the farm and in the vi- 
cinity in choice doggerel, and mailed it 
to her. A precious young goose she 
must have thought me. I represented 
her favorite horse as about to die of 
melancholy because she was not there 
to ride him; told her the trees and 
flowers were all perishing because 
she was not present to smile upon 
them, and killed off two very worthy and 
healthy neighbors because ♦heir names 
happened to rhyme with some word of a 
m<jrtuary character. The whole letter 
was wildly sepulchral in its nature, and 
half amused and half scared the young 
'ady. I remember that it closed with 
these pathetic lines: 

•• 'I must end my letter 
And brintr it to a clo.<e; 

Perliaps it will be better 
To make the next in prose.' 
The eagerne.sa with which she con- 
sented to this proposition made me fear 
that poetry was not exactly my best card. 
But she was a dear, sweet girl, and upon 
her return home she petted and en- 
couraged my poor little rhymes much 
more than they deserved. The grief of 
my boyhood was her death, a few years 
afterward. She would have made her 
mark in literature, and I hope is today 
writing songs in hearen." 



[From the French.] 

'Which one of these two roadways, pretty 
maid, is mine?" 
• Where do you go, sir knight? For that you 
do not say."' 
"Thy bare, brown lejr Is round, with turn of 

ankle fine; 
The baiiket on thy head brings lovely arms in 

play: 
Dark are thy lashes, drooping over eyes that 
shlue. 
I know not where I go. for I will go thy 
way." 

Then 'tis to find Teo, the goatherd, that you 
go. 
To whom my leg so round shall very quickly 
take 
My eyelasshes, my lips with kisses to bestow. 
All that I have of love, of beauty, for hlrf" 
sake. 
And all too little U to quench the fevered 
glow 
That in his charmed heart mv presence can 
awake." 

'It unto love atone thy favor thou wouldst 
yield, 
I love thee; but if more than this, to pleas- 
ure thee 
One needs must guide a flock eachjday to graze 
a-fleld, »^ 

Accursetl then be fate that from mine in- 
fancy 
Set me apart for war and carnage, bade me 
wield 
The sword, and gave no shepherd's pipe of 
reeds to me!" 

"A warrior i.« a king amid all human kind '. 
The shepherds, trembling, meet the hero 
with acclaim. 
And haughty Is, of right, the mistress of hl« 
mind; 
His house is held In fear, it« warder Is his 
name. 
How I would love Teo to captain's rank as-' 

hand that should 



[Lippimxjtt's Magazine for February.] 
They sat on a limb of a crab-apple tree, 
A Bogy, a S|Hiok, and a little Banshee. 
The wind blew north, and the wind blew 
free,— ' 

Oil. 'twas a merry meeting. 
The Ilogy had eyes as big as a plate. 
The Spook had feet uuujltor twenty-eight. 
While the Baushoe had covere<i her liorrililc 
putt' 
With the ghastliest kind of sheeting. 

Said the Bogy, at last, with a dismal wall, 
"To frigliten folks now I always full; 
Thev laugh instead of liccomlngpale 

When tliey Ht midnight meet me. 
Our luisiner.s i.< falling in disrepute. 
It, a neither priMiiirlive of fame nor loot: 
Hack to the sha<k's I tliiuk I'll scoot.— 

Tliere the ghosts will be glad to greet me." 

"Not far from here." croaked the grim Banshee, 
"Lives a lonely man of low degree; 
Pale and sad and sickly he. 

And 'twould he luiiny, very. 
To frighten him into a fearful fit. 
Just to 'liven us up a bit. 
Before we take our final fit 

Oyer the spectral ferry. 

"We'll descend on him in a baleful bunch. 
Grinning as if we'd like him for lunch; 
I'll liowl, while the Bogy his teeth can 
scrunch: 
The Si'ook can ho sadly singing." 
"Agi^-e-I."' cried the ghastly, gliostly pair. 
They s[>ed nwav through the midnight air, 
Koute<i the ivcluse out of his lair. 

By their howls, and growls, and ringing. 

Courteously lie invited them In. 

In vain did the Spook grimace and grio. 

And tlie Bogy r.ilse a horrible din: 

Their host smiled more than any. 
Heilidn't turn pale nor his blofxl congeal. 
But considerately asked. "Well, how do you 

feel'/" 
And spread them out a bountiful meal. 

While his welcome words were many. 

"Do yon not stand," said the Bogy, "aghast 
At the terrible trio who join your repast? 
We, whosi- business it is to cast 

Mortals in misery dumb:" 
"Afraid of siH-'ctresI" he laughed. "Not 

much ! 
I make my living by dealing in such- 
Black and white, Danish and Dutch. 

Sweet Sptx)ks, I'm a medium V 



the right current 



sigBed. 
With (I 



doughty sword in 
maintain my fame!" 



K very body Will THke It, 

Aspiring journalist — I wish you would 
suggest a taking name for my new 
paper. 

Experienced newspaper man— Call it 
The Morning Quinine. 



"Spring to the saddle then behind me. Safe 
with me 
Thou shall be brave and them who envy thee 
deride. 
My part in all the spoils of captured towns 
shall be 
Jewels and chains of gold to deck thy 
beauty's pride. 
And when we pass the folk shall cry aloud to 
see: 
'Behold the glorious bridegroom and the 
radiant bride!' " 



for your sake you wish me 
my goatherd in the 



"What: Bad man 
to betray 
Tlie faith 1 vowed 
meadow land! 
If I abandon him then he will pine away 
And d'e— at lea^fc he gave me so to under- 
stand. 
And how can I, sir knigfat, mount to your 
saddle, pray, 
I'nless you lend to me your stirrup and your 
band?" 

What i« a Mmlel Wife f 

Ladies Home Journal: A model wife 
is the woman in whom the heart of her 
husband doth safely trust. 

She is the woman who looks after his 
household, and make.s her hospitality a 
delight to him and not a burden. 

Who has learned that a soft answer 
will turn away wrath. 



Wi.se Sayings of a Great Man. 

New York Post: The prize medal for 
absent-mindedness during lectures must 
be awarded to a German professor named 
Johannes Amer, who recently died in 
Vienna. One of his pupils has a lijt of 
his remarkable sayings, among them the 
following: "Julius Ca>sar, disguised as a 
slave, swam naked across the Tiber." 
"Alexanaer the Great was born in the 
absence of his parents." "The Swiss are 
a mountainous nation, but in Scotland 
the climate does not begin till October." 
"Hogs were invented in Asia Minor." 
"Thus arose a general war on page fH." 
"The third- Tunic war would have been 
out much sooner had it commenced a 
little earlier." "Ctivered with countless 
wounds C:esar fell dead near the statue 
of Ponipey; with one hand he drew his 
toga over his face, while with the other 
he called for help." 



F:<iitorial Opinion. 

We hear a great deal about "public 
opinion." Did you ever stop to think 
that in nine instances out of ten it is 
only the opinion of the able editors of 
the country? They do the thinking for 
the great mass of their fellow citizens, 
and generally they do it well. They de- 
vole time and study to the formation of 
their opinions, they read widely and 
travel extensively, and so are usually the 
best qualititd class in the community to 
express a sound opinion. Last August 
some '200 of the editors of Minnesota 
took a trip over "The Burlington" from 
St. Paul to Chicago, riding by daylight 
down the east bank of the Mississippi, 
enjoying the magnificent scenery, and it 
was their opinion, in their de-scriptions 
of the tour after their return, that "The 
Burlington," as a first-class railroad line, 
is unequaled in all respect*. Tr>- it, and 
^•ou will auree with their "opinion, 
rickets, maps, time-tables, and all in- 
formation, can be had from local agents 
or by writting to W. J. C. Kenyon, Gen. 
Pass. Agents St. Paul, Minn. 



Dancing and Deportment. 

Prof. Jatnee S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No. 113 
West Pirst street Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' nnd gents', 
Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 

Indian river oranges at Victor Huot's. 



and drift on 
to fortune with apparent ease. 
But such people never refuse 
splendid opportunities, or turn 
their backs on small things. It 
is the easiest thing in the world 
to make money if you only get 
into the right drift. The old 
lady had faith that the goose 
was a good one, and she "caught 
on" so quick that the goose 
yielded up a golden egg and the 
poor woman's fortune was made. 
Now, you may smile when we 
apply the moral to something 
practical. It would have been 
no more unwise for the dear old 
lady to have refused to accept 
the goose till she had first been 
introduced to the stranger and 
ascertained that he was of a re- 
spectable family, than it is for 
}'ou to stand hesitating as to 
whether you should buy lots in 
Crosley Park at the give away 
prices we are offering. In 
a year from now we will all 
see how ridiculous it was for 
Mr. Crosley to sell such tine 
property at such prices (to say 
nothing of the terms) and for 
you to stand by looking on when 
you should have known that val- 
ues must inevitably make such 
large advances in so shoit a 
time. When 'spring opens up 
(and there is but one more 
month of winter) there will be 
from fifty to one hundred new 
houses built in Crosley Psrk 
and Lester Park adjoining. 
Within six months suburban 
trains will run each wa}' every 
half hour from 6 a. m. till mid- 
night, and the fare will proba- 
bly be the same as street car 
fare. Then, too, within a year 
you can build a $50,000 resi 
dence down there if you wish, 
and you can have water, sewers 
and electric lights the same as 
you have in Duluth. All these 
things are now assured, and 
those who buy Crosley Park 
lots by the quantity at present 
prices will make big money. 
We propose to advance prices 
soon and we suggest that it 
would be a good idea to buy 
before that time; i e, if you 
care to niake money. There is 
always a time to buy and a time 
to sell, and now is the time to 
buy lots at Crosley Park, and 
any time during the next tive 
) ears you will have opportuni- 
ties of selling so as to make 
large profits. Call at the office 
and get further information. 

C. L LOIIETT i CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 




L BE SOLO VEfiY CHEAP -:- 





-ALSO- 



A LOT 



-IN 



BLOCK 12, 




L 




Hiree Good 6oili| Lots on illi Street, 



K 



Near Third avenue east 




All 



these are well located and very accessible. 
Good schools and graded streets close by. 



MICHIGAN STREET, 



FOR SALE 



-AT- 



Below MaW Price 



Apply by letter or in person to 



"ED," 



Cuf^iEE X3:EI^.A.XuID. 



MEMBERS OF THE 



If taken at once. 



L0I sold next 
property for $335. 



DDLDTH CLEARING HODSE ASSOCIATION. 



American Exchange Bank 
Bell & Eyster's Bank 
First Naional Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of Commerce 
Marine Elank 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
100,000 

1,000,000 
100,000 
100.000 
100.000 
260,000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

10,000 

100.000 

26,000 



Address 



LS., 



Post office Box A A. 




R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 

Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty. JS'Good workmi-j- 
shlp guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



209 East Superior Street. 



y 



Duluth, Minn. 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Boons S10. S11 and i\l Dulutb Union lational Bant Building. 



■1 *, ^^ 



* i 





w^H- 



u4 I ■■ 



C. E. DYER, President. 



J. M. ANDERSON, Vice-President. 



W. H. LEE, Secretary and Treasurer 



THE DULUTH MUSIC COMPANY, 



(SUCCESSORS TO W. d. DYER & BRO.) 

I 1 5 WEST SUPERIOR STREET, DEALERS IN 



PIANOS. ORGANS AND MUSICAL MERCHANDISE 



t 



AGENTS FOR STEINWAY, CHICKERING, BEHR BROS., WEBER, GABLER, 

AND KRANICH & BACH PIANOS. 



/, 



^ 




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PACKARD, BOUDOIR, AND 

WILCOX & WHITE ORGANS. 



DULUTH, MINN 



EIEITS III SOCIEn. 



Assembly Ball; Clan Stewart's 

Anniversary; Other 

Affairs. 



Nunnber of Pleasant Weddings; 

Numerous Personal 

Notes. 



What the Musically-Inclined 

Duluthians Are Doing 

Now. 



Social matters have been quiet again 
this week, due again to a prevalance of 
a grip that has a firmer hold on the pe^j- 
ple than has the pleasures of society. 
The assembly ball, on Wednesday even- 
ing was perhaps the leading event of the 
week and was greatly enjoyed by about 
150 prominent society people. The usual 
g-Dod music and splendid floor made 
dancing a pleasure. There were many 

beautiful costumes, and these, with the 
fair faces, the fragrant flowers and the 
brightness, made a scene of taste and 
elegance. 



The Bums anniversary celebrated by 
Clan Stewart last night, as predicted by 
The Herald yesterday, was a highly suc- 
cessful and enjoyable affair. The ban- 
quet w as enjoyed by about 300 ladies 
and gentlemen. Chief Simon Clark 
gave an excellent address, which was 
heartily received. The program was 
carried out to the satisfaction of every- 
one, all the participants doing them- 
selves credit. The affair was one of the 
most pleasant the clan has ever indulged 
in and will be long remembered. 

The French band will hold a bax.ar at 
Ingalls hall on the night of .Jan. .30. A 
concert wnll be given by the band. The 
proceeds of this bazar will be expended 
in purchasing new instrumenta 

An enjoyable sleighing party rode out 
to the residence of Mr. and Mrs. O. L. 
Voung at Lakeside last night, organized 
as a surprise party. They were most 
hospitably received, being served with a 
substantial lunch, and the evening was 
pleasantly passed. Those in the party 
were Messrs. Charles Fitzsimmons. O. C. 
Reitan, N. C Bunting, W. H. Jennings, 
Frank Parkes, E. L. Whittington and J. 
H. Connors. The ladies were Misses 
Grace Maxwell, Roses Patterson, Hattie 
Jones, Taylor, White, Bunting and 
Walker. 

The MarrisKe B«lls. 

Wednesday morning Mr. Chauncey E. 
Richardson, son of the late F. A. Rich- 
ardson, and Miss Ada E. Eva were 
married. The ceremony was performed 
by Rev. C. K. Capron. Both Mr. and 
Mrs. Richardson are well known among 
Duluth's society people and their frientls 
are many. Mr. Richardson is a young 
man who has recently 8tarte<l in busi- 
ness for himself and succeeded through 
his sterling character and business prin- 
ciples. For years he was with the firm 
of Richardson, Day & Co. The bride 
gud groom started on a brief trip to 



Chicago. They will reside at 128 West 
Third street. 

Frank Thomas, son of Alderman Mor- 
ris Thomas, and Miss Annie Green of 
Park Point, were married Wednesday 
evening by Rev. E. M. Noyes at the 
home of the bride. There were only the 
more intimate friends present, and Mr. 
and Mrs. Thomas left for a short wed- 
ding trip last night. 

On the same evening the marriage of 
Mr. A. L. Macgregor and Miss Cora M. 
Little took place. The bride is the only 
child of Mrs. Abaga'l E. Little, whose 
husband will be remembered as one of 
Duluth's most prominent business men. 
The groom is a young man of many ster- 
ling qualities. He Jholds the position of 
secretary of the Croeley Park Land com- 
pany. Miss Ethel Birch acted as maid 
of honor and Master Jamie Ray as page. 
After the happy couple had received 
congratulations they departed for a brief 
honeymoon. The ceremony took place 
at the residence of the bride's uncle, 
Frederick Little, and was performed by 
Rev. E. M. Noyes. Mr. and Mrs. Mac- 
gregor will be at home after Feb. 10, at 
18 West Second street. 

Mr. Elmer Hail, assistant ticket agent 
at the Duluth Union depot, was mar- 
ried Monday evening to Miss Taylor of 
Fond du Lac, Wia. a sister of Superin- 
tendent Taylor of the Rome, Watertown 
.fc Ogdensburg road. The couple re- 
turns to this city after a short bridal 
tour and will reside here. 

Mr. J. F. Gordon, of the Duluth firm 
of Gordon Jt Henszey, will be married on 
next Wednesday at Fort Penn, Del., to 
Miss Mary Cleaver. They will come at 
once to Duluth and will reside at 314 
Sixth avenue west. 

The wedding of Mr. J. J. Crorve to 
Miss C. Pastoret is to take place in a 
few weeks. The banns will be published 
at Sacred Heart church Sunday for 
the first time. The young couple have 
numerous friends in the city who will be 
pleased to hear of their marriage, and 
will be ready to offer congratulations. 

Mr. Alex McGregor and Miss Coraline 
McLachlan will be married Feb. 5, at 
the former home of the bride's parents. 
Fort Wayne. Ind. The bride is well and 
mf)9t favorably known in Duluth. 
and is the daughter of Neil McLachlan 
of this city. Mr. McGregor is also a 
well-known young business man. The 
young couple, after a short wedding 
tour, will return to this city and reside 
on Third avenue east. 



People in Print. 

Mrs. E. H. Fish left yesterday for an 
Eastern trip. 

Mr. and Mrs. Rupley left yesterday for 
! a trip in the East. They will go to Mrs. 
Rupley's old home in Pennsylvania. 

Mrs. Craddock is in Seattle. As soon 
as she is settled her children will join 
her. 

Bishop McGolrick is in Jamestown, N. 
D., where he takes part tomorrow in the 
the installation services of Bishop Shan- 
ley of North Dakota. The latter is a 
brother of Mrs. C. E. Judd of this city, 
and is the youngest Roman Catholic 
bishop in the West, probably in Amer- 
ica. ' 

Mrs. Wm. R. Stone, who left here 
early last week to take a trip with her 
husband and with Mr. and Mrs. Cully- 
ford in the South and in Mexico, lies ill 
at Chicago and has been unable to 
travel. 

Mrs. R. Hall has gone to San Fran- 
cisco, where she will remain several 
months. 

Hon. J. C. Milne of Crookston, a 
former resident of Duluth, is the guest 
of Jacob Laux. 

Mrs. Thomas Hulbert on Monday 
cabled friends in this city that she had 
arrive<l safely in Paps with her little 
son. They are now safely in Rome. 



who, after leaving California, will spend 
a short time in Mexico. 

Mr. Walter Marshall is enjoying a visit 
with southern Wisconsin friends. 

Mr. S. A. Thompson accompanied by 
his wife and children has gone to his 
old home in Richmond, Ind. Mrs. 
Thompsfjn and the children will proceed 
from there to Cincinnati, and Mr. 
Thompson will spend several weeks in 
the Battle Creek Sanitarium. 

Mr. and Mrs. D. G. Penny left last 
night for a ten day visit >n the southern 
part of the state. 

Rev. W. M. Barker, of St. Pauls, has 
just returned from a trip to the south- 
western part of the state, where he has 
been preaching a mission. 

Mr. C. C. Jones of Minneapolis, is a 
guest of Judge Ensign. Mr. Jones was 
an old resident of Duluth. Mr. John 
Gordon, Jr.. of Chicago, is also staying 
for a few days with Judge and Mrs. En- 
sign. 

Col. and Mrs. Graves left Thursday 
evening for a long visit to Washington 
and the East. They will be absent 
some time. 

Mr. Thomas Monahan, United States 
customs inspector, will leave in a few 
days for a trip to the British Islee. 

Hon. L5eriah Magoffin of Lexington, 
Ky., is again in the city. 

Architect Austin Terryberry has gone 
East for a visit to friends in Canada. 

Mr. Robert Forbes has returned from 
Algoma, Ont., where he has been visit- 
ing several weeks. 

Mrs. Thomas A. Whittaker has re- 
turned to Duluth from an extended visit 
in Dayton. Ohio. 

Mr.' Arthur M. Smith, private secre- 
tary of Vice-President Carpenter of the 
Duluth & Iron Range, left yesterday for 
a two weeks' visit at Fort Dodge, Iowa 

The death of Mrs. C. S. Weaver, at 
Leavenworth, Kan., lately of Bismarck, 
but an early resident of Duluth, is an- 
nounced. Mrs. Weaver was among the 
most popular women of the early days 
here, and a devoted Christian. Her 
death will be greatly deplored. 

Miss Hardy of the Hardy school at 
Eau Claire returned to that city early 
this week. It is probable she will locate 
in Duluth next fall. Miss Kathriue 
Woodbridge leaves Monday for Eau 
Claire to enter the schof)l. 

Mrs. Royal F. King of Minneapolis, 
formerly Miss Vrooman, a well-known 
Duluth soprano singer, has been visiting 
Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Warner this week. 

Dr. and Mrs. Sheldon Storer of New 
York city, will locate here. The doctor 
is a dentist and sustains an enviable 
reputation. 

Miss Tracy Hartman and Miss Susie 
Stearns left Sunday for California for 
the benefit of their health. They were 
accompanied by Mr. Alex. W. Hartman, 

West Knd Society. 

The masquerade at Twentieth avenue 
rink Thursday was a very pleasant and 
successful affair. The costumes, for the 
most part, were both fanciful and ele- 
gant. 

The West End Social club held a very 
pleasant reception in Norman na hall, 
Wednesday evening. On Feb. 18 a mas- 
querade is to be held by the club. 

The Epworth league will hold the 
next free social at Mr. and Mrs. Wm. 
Hubbard's residence on the Slst. Every 
one is invited to attend. 

There will be a masquerade at Erick- 
son's rink tonight. 

The "mum" social at the Estey read- 
ingroom was a verj- interesting social af- 
fair. The attendance was excellent. 
Not <me who was present ix)iild keep 
"muin" so that the 8<;ciety cleared quite 
a large amount. The society held its 
regular business meeting yesterday 
afternoon. 

Dr. Fannie Holden, who has been 
afflicted with acute rheumatism for some 
week^, is much improved. 



IN MUSIC MATTERS. 



In 



Considerable l.il<- :i<id Aulniation in 
Local MuHic CircU'n. 

Music was the one part of heaven left 
on earth after Adam's fall; and among a 
music loving people should be found all 
that is goo<.i and noble and inspiring in 
mankind. Music appeals to the natural 
refinements, and, other q ualities being 
equal, a musician can always find recog- 
nition from the best society; but the 
term best, however, is not always synon 
omous with the term "most fashionable." 
Within the last two years Duluth has 
won a place among the musical centers 
of the Northwest; and although this is 
one of the busiest of all places its peo- 
ple have not allowed the scramble for 
dollars to make them forget a taste for 
music. 

The Mozart musicale was given to a 
small audience last evening. "Lorely." 
the soprano solo by Miss French, and 
the duet by Miss French and H. P. Rob- 
inson were the most enjoyable numbers 
of the program. Mme. Beaulieu, Mrs. 
Tonning, Mrs. Gunnis, Miss Bostwick 
and the Misses Costello took part. A 
symphony in D major for eight hands, 
by the latter was a feature of the enter- 
tainment. 

When the Duluth Music company 
built Steinway hall musical matters 
were given a new impetus, and this 
enterprise will benefit musical circles. 
The hall is for the use of musicales, and 
is a place where concerts, musicales, re- 
citals, etc., will be held. Already ar- 
rangements are being made to give in 
this hall, a series of afternoon and even- 
ing soirees, in which Duluth society will 
take part. The music company has sent 
for opera chairs, and the hall will l>e 
ready for use soon. Potted plants, 
flowers, paintings and engravings will 
be used to decorate the place. 

Musical Notes. 

Duluth may expect some musical 
treats during the next three months, not 
only from traveling organizations, but 
from local talent. Several schemes are 
on the tapis among the best talent ot 
this city, and several operas, staged in 
excellent shape and sung weil, may be 
given before long. 

The next operatic performance to be 
given here will Ije by the Bostonians. 
Among others they will sing "Don 
Quixote," their new opera. 

Mr. Edgar L. Eva has been engaged 
by Red Wing society people to sing the 
tenor role in the "Chimes of Normandy," 
which is to be given at that place soon 
by local talent. 

Mr. Frank E. Hoare, the talented 
young musician of this city, has com- 
posed a beautiful piece of music for the 
violin. It is called "Chapel Sounds," 
and is a composition of unusual merit. 
Its author is meeting deserved praise 
from those who have heard the piece. 

The "Little Tycoon" will not lie pre- 
sented by West End vocalists. The 
sjheme is said to have fallen through. 

An entertainment w ill be given at the 
Bethel some time in February, at which 
a famous lady elocutionist from Cincin- 
nati will appear. In support Mme. 
Beaulieu will give several piauo selec- 
tions. Miss French and Mr. Edgar Eva 
will sing, and Mr. Frank E. Hoare will 
give the audience enjoyment with his 
violin. 

Mr. Collins, the pianist, is the attrac- 
tion which draws many lovers of more 
than ordinary piano music to Porter's 
mueic store. 

Under the management of the Du- 
Inth Academy of Music ac-oncert will be 
'given soon in 'Ashland. Messrs. Hoare 
and Eva, Mme. Beaulieu and others will 
take part. 

The Apfillo club met Wednesday even- 
ing at the rooms of Mr. H. Parker Rob- 
inson. Webe.{. 



ALL WANT II mm. 



Early Residents All Anxious 

to See an Historical 

Society. 



They Consider it a Project of 

Importance and Great 

Value. 



Number of Interesting Letters 

to The Herald from 

Them. 



Some two weeks ago The Hera Id con 
tained a brief conversation of Judge J. D. 
Ensign on the value and need of a local 
historical society, an organizaticm that 
should collect and preserve for the public 
benefit all articles illustrative of the 
early history of this section, both written 
and in material form, and more particu- 
larly of securing in more lasting shape 
the remembrances of old settlers in re- 
gard to their early life and struggles at 
the head of Lake Sui>erior. 

From the first the suggestion met 
with favors and many letters have been 
received by this paper advo(;ating the 
project. Of these a first installment is 
given today. It is believed that the his- 
tory of the head of Lake Superior, from 
the time of DuLliut and the .Jesuit 
fathers, two centuries ago, to the forma 
tion of the Northwestern headquarters 
of the John Jacob i ^tor Fur company 
at Fond du Lac in thi early part of this 
century and the early settlements at and 
following 185G, furnish more food of in- 
cident and romance than the early life 
of any other Western p()int. 
Many mementoes of the early times 
are saved and can be had by such a 
8o<nety, while the wealth of personal 
reminiscence it could gather would be of 
immense value. This latter is growing 
less year by year, alas, as the older set- 
tlers" pass beyond the reach of tongue or 
pen. 

Below are a number of letters 
received on the subject: 

The following letter is from J. C.Wise, 
proprietor of The Mankato Review, wh« 
was publisher of the earliest newppaper 
printed at the head of Lake Superior, 
The Superior Cronicle, in 1857: 

I think that theidea of an historical 
society an excellent one. Such pioneers 
as George R. Stuntz, J. D Ray, Wm. 
Nettleton, etc., will soon pass away, and 
the recollections of these men in connec- 
tion with your early history should be 
secured and preserved. 

I know no man so thoroughly compe- 
' tent to write up the early days at the 
\ head of the lake as Mr. Stuntz. He was 
I one of the original founders of Duluth, 
and I remember the day that he, George 
' Nettleton, Wm. Nettleton, Orrin Rice and 
] others of his associates came to Superior, 
after taking steps to plat and lay out Du- 
! luth then at the head of the point. 
I John R. Howard, I think, had platted 
! Portland; Capt. Marklaud, Endion. 



had laid out and was building upOneota, 
all now within the limits of Duluth, and 
I am quite sure that none, even in their 
greatest enthusiasm, ever conceived as 
possible the grand city which nerve nnd 
enterprise has built up at Duluth. We 
all thought Superior was the great em- 
porium to be, and that the others would 
be the suburbs, their future depending 
upon ti)e greatness of the city laid out 
upon the Wisconsin shore. 

I have written some incidents of early 
life at the head of the lake for a publica- 
tion to be issued by Mr. Frank A. Flower. 
My newspaper cares are now a little 
exacting, but as I can get rid of them, as 
I 8o<jn propose to do, I will be pleased to 
recall additional incidents for publica- 
cation. I look back to the days spent at 
the head of the lake with much pleasure, 
and hope often to visit the locality and 
witness the development of what we all 
labored so hard for, and thought 
we were on the eve of accom- 
plishing in 1857, when the 
terrible crash of that year deferred all 
our hopes. The term "blasted," which I 
thoughtlessly wrote above but erased, 
for deferred, is too strong — we never 
thought that possible, for when hun- 
dreds of us left the lake country for 
other homes in 1857 and '58 it was with 
the firm conviction that some day would 
see the grandest commercial metropolis 
at the head of the lake that the country 
west of Chicago would ever know. It is 
now being realized, rapidly, grandly, and 
nothing can stay its progress. 

John C. Wise. 

Mankato, .Jan. 20. 

^\^ 

I will say it seems to me that an his- 
torical society, as mentioned in The 
Herald, would be useful in gathering 
reminiscence that would be interesting 
in the future. Work it up; the idea is 
good, and I hope I may sometime be able 
to contribute some items of interest. 
Geo. L. Brooks. 

Superior, Jan. 19. 



suburban residences for people doing 
business at Superior; Orrin Rice pre- 
empted and held as a trading station 
through his brother-in-law, Zachi Brown, 
what is now Rices Point; and Elder Ely 



I have seen late articles in The Herald 
and in reply would say that in my opinion 
the organization of an historical society 
at the head of the lakes should bo en- 
couraged, and will, I hope, be accom- 
plished l>efore long. 

I am not prepared just now to furnish 
such an organization with incidents of 
the early times. Will take pleasure in 
doing so later. S. H. Clough. 

Superior, Jan. 17. 

I have carefully read all concerning 
this historical society. I am very much 
lately 1''! favor of establishing such a society 
'^and also will be very willing to supply it 
with some incidents of early life at the 
head of the lake. I am now somewhat 
busy in filling ice-houses and being on 
ice all day these cold days, a fellow feels 
somewhat tired at night, but will try to 
assist all I am able. 

August Zaohau. 
Superior, Jan. 20. 



My opinion as to the formation of an 
historical society is a little mixed. Now 
if we could claim as citizens some noted 
personages such as Columbus, Pizarro, 
Corlez, Smith, Pfxjahontas and Cook, 
we should preserve th.m in type, but 
our notorious citizens may bettor bo 
laid away in oblivion. We would hope 
that history would never re- 
veal the existence of such 
men as tome we have had even lately. 
Or what \ould be better to wish that 
such men might nev r exist at all. 

Now the Old Settlers assticiation, feel- 
ing the benefit and satisfaction it would 
be to the coming citiz^en, appointed a 
committee known as the historical com- 
mittee directed to solicit from all mem- 
bers such items of history as came 



within their ob.servation and transmit 
to committee for compilation. This was 
at the anaual meeting one year ago. 
Last Dec( mber at the last meeting, as 
you know there were several who had 
not completed their manuscript. On 
motion tlie committee's time was ex- 
tended another year. I understand from 
the secret iry that there has been a very 
fair respo ase to the requests sent out. 
One mem jer having thirty-seven pages 
of manuscript and the question comes 
would it l>e advisable to organize a sep- 
arate soc.ety. Why, yes, of course, if 
the old chaps won't blow their trumpets, 
but for this we will have to wait until 
another I »ecember and listen. I am an 
old settle- and a member of the associa- 
tion and if we can make its historical 
work reafonably complete it would add 
much to its usefulness and interest and 
whatever I can do in this line will be 
done with great satisfaction. 

H. W. Wheelek. 
Oneota .Tan. 21. 

--*■ i ■*- 
I think the majority will be in favor of 
it. I have been here twenty three years 
last .June Wnen I came here Duluth 
was all wxkJs. I came to Superior first. 
There an > some of the old settlers anx- 
ious to build a building all of cedar, use 
it for reli .IS, the records, etc. of the so- 
ciety, am also as a place where the old 
settlers v ould meet each other. 

Hon. J. D. Howakd. 

TheneA' comers maybe curious to 
know how those who earliest came man- 
aged to make life enjoyable when Du- 
luth was only a little settlement here 
alone on Minnesota Point, and a little 
strip of lake shore to the eastward. The 
early pioneers are fond of telling of the 
many fro ics gotten up for the purpose 
of makin,f life merry when there were 
few objects known outside of their own 
homes. But I am not of the pioneers— 
my memory of Duluth carries me only 
to the sp -ingof '72, and that was after the 
place hac, become a city, containing two 
or three liotels, three brick blocks, some 
little schx)l houses, some churches and 
one elevntor. 

The newly made canal, and the vari- 
ous lake :;rafts, the daily incoming and 
outgoing trains on the Northern Pacific 
and St. I aul & Duluth roads were giv- 



ing the city a boom. Building was 
going on rapidly, lots were being sold to 
speculators, all was "merry as a marriage 
biell" until the great financial set-back in 
the summer of '73. Then times were 
changed. Soon the flourishing young 
city began to grow smaller, 
and later it Ijecame a village. 
During those years of contraction, trains 
brought mer(;handis© and took away 
some things; but they neither brought 
nor took any lecturers, singers or actors. 
The villagers dei>ended upon their own 
resources for amusements. Reading 
circles and musicales were formed. 
M(x;k trials, exhibitions of Madame 
Jarley's w ax works, etc., were sandwiched 
in between church socials, private 
parties, lunches, recei>tions and theatri 
cals in a way to charm both young and 
old. Mrs. S. B. Steakns. 

Mrs. Sarah L. Bradshaw, wife of Peter 
E. Bradshaw of Superior, writes: Mr. 
Bradshaw is very ill, were he able I am 
sure he would gladly aid an historical 
society, and would give any assistance 
material and data of interest to old as 
well as young settlers, that he could. 
But I fear that he will before long be 
bey<jnd the reach of tongue or pen. 



The discussion seems to have awak- 
ened wide interest among old settlers 
and The Herald has many more letters 
and expressions endorsingsuch a society 
as has been proi»osed. These it will 
give at a later date. 



I>on't Want a Compromlne. 

Young McNabb of St. Paul, who was 
arrested here by ('hief Doran during the 
early part of the week, was a forger and 
secured 8650 from the Capital Bank of 
St. Paul. His father has offered to 
mortgage his home and sell some of his 
furniture to raise money for a settle- 
ment if the bank will not prosecute and 
no warrant has yet been issued. States 
Attorney Egan grew quite wrathy when 
the prisoner was brought before the 
judge, and turning to President Kirk of 
the bank said, "If this is going to be a 
! shake down I will not be a party to it." 
I He refusetl to have anything to do wU,h 



the prosecution. 



MiO ALUM — NO AMMONIA- 
NO PHOSPHATES, 



NO LIMEL 
IN — 




I 



<?; 



for 



cream"^ 

Baking Powder 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for more than a quarter of a 
Oentory It U used by the United States Government. End-irsed by the heads of the 
OcMt I Diversities as the Strongest, Purest and Most Healthfiil. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO. 

!■)' YORK- CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. SAN FKANCISCO. 



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NKK'-r^ -« 



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AHJI.UTH Bvmnyg hbbam), jaj^ttaky 25, isoo. 



The Associated Banks' Weekly 

Statement Shows Easy 

Money. 



PERSONAL. 



The Markets for Grain and 

Stocks are Lower Than 

Ever. 



There was another decidetl break 
wheat today, caused by the selliL,, 
loug lines. The break here all came 



the opening, which was .^^c below last 
night's close. After that there was a 
firming up of Kic, but this was soon lost 
and up to the day a very weak feeling 
prevailed. 

There seems to be a selling mania at 
all points. Chicago is leading in the 
break and in the absence of all bull news 
operators there are having little trouble 
in putting prices lower. The decline 
here for the week was a full cent. 

No. hard cash and January closed at 
"T^c nominal; No. 1 northern, ~5^( 
nominal; and No. '2 northern cash at T3c 
nominal; May opened at 82 '•4c, firmed 
up to 8"J'jc, declined again to 82 ^jc, con- 
tinued weak and closed at 82 ,'40 sellers; 
May No. 1 northern sold and closed at 
TOi^c. 

Chicago (ioiuilp. 

The following is from the special wire 
of W. W. Bill A Co., dealers in stocks: 

This is a bull market and everything 
now pvnnts to still higher prices. Condi- 
tions dare long been gradually shaping 
themselves for a rising market and the 
developments this week indicate beyond 
a doubt that the bears hase had their 
day. The bank statement today was a 
phenominal one, showing an increase in 
the surplus reserve of over 8T,l.X)(.1,000. 
This assures easy money and in connec- 
tion with the increasing inquiry for 
stocks puts the situation in a more bull- 
ish aspect than it has been for sL\ 
months. Chicago is leading the buying 
side. May expect occasional reactions 
but the grangers, V'anderbilts and low- 
priced slocks generally are good at cur- 
rent prices or any concessions. 



W. T. Cote, a brother-in-law of J. T. 
Condon, has purchased a half interest 
in Mr. Condon's furnishing business in 
this city and will move here from Bay 
City. 

Mr. H. D. Minot, president of the East- 
ern Minnesota road; Messrs. G. Williams 
and R. M. Bradley, members of the com- 
pany, came up from St. Paul this morn- 
ing, and wer-3 in the city a short time. 

Mr. W. P. Dixon, a Jamestown, N. Y., 
business man, is registered at The 
Spalding. 

Dr. George Crawford, M. D., brother 
of Air. Alexander Crawford of this city, 
died on Jan. 4 in Glasgow, Scotland, his 
home. Dr. Crawford spent some time 
m Duluth last summer with his two 
daughters, hoping the climate might be 
of benefit to him. He made many friends 
here. 

Mr. N. H. Wilson, an attorney, left for 
the East this morning, and will return in 
a few days with his family. 

Mrs. Edward E. Strothman of West 
Superior, entertained a party of young 
people from Duluth Friday evening. 
After a musical program, refreshments 
were served, and all present voted it a 
pleasant evening. 

A. M. Miller, Jr., treasurer of Temple 
Opera, will return to Duluth this even- 
ing from a visit to Lincoln, 111., where he 
has Deen attending the wedding of his 
sister. 

John H. Davey, late of Bradford, Ont.. 
and Miss Clara Lee of Stayner, O., were 
married last Tuesday afternoon by Kev. 
E. S. Pilling. The liappy couple left in 
the evening for their wedding trip East. 
E. Morcom, of Tower, the well known 
iron man, is in the city. 

A. M. Sheldon, the Cloquet lumber- 
man, is registeretl at The Spalding. 

Dr. E. B. Kingland and family arrived 
this evening from Keokuk, Iowa, for a 
visit with Kev. E. B. Kingland of this 
citv. 



BfiETHBEN OF THE GfllP. 



At 



the Various Lodges 
Chapters of Orders ir 
Duluth. 



and 



Nearly All are Growing and Im- 
proving With Every 
Week, 



Chicaj^ Wheat, 

The following dispatches are over the 
private Wires of W. SV. Bill, successor to 
Pressy, Wheeler Jc Lewis: 

Wheat, active, lower and very weak. 
The prices passed SO for May overnight, 
indicating that the resting orders at that 
price had been titled yesterday and the 
early weakness showed not only that 
langs were prepared 10 sell freely, but 
that so many shorts had been tilled that 
purchases were no longer of importance. 
The market today has been one of liqui- 
dation. In the absence of any important 
news, one can see nothing to make higher 
prices on Monday, especially as the esti- 
mate of the visible points either to a 
standoff or a very small decrease, as 
against a decrease of a million for the 
same week a year ago. 
Corn, firm but dull and featureless. 
Provision, lower, with some disiMjsition 
on the part of local scalpers to shake out 
country holders who have bought on the 
advance. 



CITY BRItFS. 

Recipients of first citizenship papers 
are today Henry Nelson of Sweden, 
Severin Severtson and Marten Holden 
of Norway, John Freeland of Canada, 
John McLaughlin of Ireland. 

Storekeepers are taking advantage of 
the soft weather to remove the ice and 
snow from the sidewalks in front of their 
places of business. 

The Street Railway company has been 
obliged to transfer passengers today be- 
cause of a portion of the track at Four 
teenth avenue west being blown up by 
the CJas ifc Water company's employea 

Tom Overland, the once editor of The 
Age, while engaged in a little spree last 
night at a late hour, was gathered in by 
an officer. In going down the steps neiir 
the jail Overland slipped and fell, break- 
ing his leg below the knee. 

THE. CAUC USES. 

Pearson I>«Iesate!> Kleried in Nearly Kver? 



The Duluth lodge of R<jyal Elks, al- 
though a young lodge, is prospering and 
increasing rapidly. New members are 
being added at the rate of about half a 
dozen at each meeting. The luembers 
comprise some of the good business men 
of the city, and the organization ranks 
among the foremost social orders in Du- 
luth's secret society roster. 

Rose Croix council of Kadosh is the 
title of a new branch of Masonry organ- 
ized Thursday evening as announced in 
The Herald at the time. The institution 
was conducted by Inspector General 
-Vdams, of Minneapolis, assisted by Dr. 
Von Suessmilch, late of Delavan, Wis., 
inspector general of the Northern Divi- 
sion. This chapter is the highest ever 
aspired to bv the Duluth Masonic frater 
nity. 

Last night at the regular meeting of 
the Chapter of the Eastern Star, the 
ladies Masonic lodge, the membersgave a 
banquet at Masonic hall, at which the 
gentlemen were allowed to participate. 
It goes without saying that it was a 
highly enjoyable gastnmomic affair. The 
ladies of Eastern Star have already 
won a reputation for the excellence of 
their banquets. At the business meet- 
ing eight candidates were initiated. 

Otlicers of Zenith City lodge Odd 
Fellows were installed last week. Dis- 
trict Deputy T. W. Hugo conducting 
the installation. Duluth Encampment 
No. 28 meets Monday night Consider- 
able business will 



k Necktie, Allliougti Your Bosom Companion, is Also a Tale 

Bearer of Youf Tastes. 

Please bear in mind that MONDAY, JAN 27 
we will make prices sell one of the best assorted 
stocks of FINE NECKWEAR in the city 
, .L>ue notice will be given other lines which are 
to be sold proportionately low. 

KILGORE & SIEWERT 

Fine Hats and Men's Furnishings. 

ST. LOUIS HOTEL BLOCK, DULUTH. 
Store closes at 6:30 P. M. 




4r 



(^u.x M^^ 



m niGHI ON GUESSING. 



Seventy-five Dollars Cash to 
Closest Guessers 
Duluth. 



on 



Two Prizes Offered for 
Contest; from Nov^ to 
May. 



the 



come up 
for consideration and there will 
be new members to 
The relief committee of 



The ^> »«:-k'^ .vlu\euient. 

Wheat receipts this week, estimating 
today's at 20.Lt>0 bu., will aggregate 
about :Jq,<-)i>J bu. and shipments atwut 
3000, indicating an increase in the stocks 
here of about 34,000 bu. Corn receipts 
will be about tiOOO and shipments 20,UO0, 
making a decrease of 14,000 bu. Oats 
receipts for the week aggregate 80,- 
796 bu. 



The I>iu1t .UoTeiuent. 

Cars on track; Wheat 22, corn 2, oats 
,;,-i^®'P^^= Wheat, 10,186 bu; com, 
13o8 bu. Shipments: Com, 20.(X)0 bu. 
Inspection: Wheat No. 1 hard 21 cars 
No. 1 northern 15, No. 2 northern 1; No. 
£corn G. oats 14. Inspection out, 1 car. 
628 bu No. 2 northern wheat; U cars No 
2 com. Minneapolis cars 88, against 133 
yesterday. Receipt*: Wheat, 77,144 bu. 
Shipment^!: Wheat, 14,500 bu; Hour, 
12,olG bbl. 



l*reclnct Last >'ight. 

There was not a great deal of excite- 
ment at the caucuses last night. The 
nearest approach to anything like it was 
the First ward, where there was a ques- 
tion as to whether ballots without a 
head designating what the tickets were 
should be counted. This was a ticket 
put in at the eleveirth hour, so tu speak, 
and it came within one vote of being 

successful. It was understood that it I installation -was held 
was either in the interest of labor candi- 
dates or for M. O. Hall. The 
winner was a Pearson ticket. 
There was a tie between August John 
son on the second ticket and Charles 
Archer on the first. The Second ward 
was a Pearson and Sinclair ticket. Pear- 
son and Kugler captured the Third 
ward. The Fourth declared itself un- 
mistakably, by an overwhelming ma- 
jority for Pearson for mayor. The Fifth 
and Si.\th wards also declared for Pear- 
son. C. O. Nelson's aldermanic dele- 
gates were elected in the Fifth, and 
Siverts captured the aldermanic 
simmojs in the Sixth ward. 



initiate. 
, ^ . , the Duluth 

lodge is kept pretty busy attending to 
sick members, the grip having played 
considerable havoc. There are two 
members in the hospital with typhoid 
fever. Steps have been taken for the 
organization of a German and Scandina- 
vian lodge of Odd Fellows, which will 
shortly be instituted. 

Royal Adelphia, which for some time 
has been in a state of comi)arative inani- 
tion, has taken quite a spurt the la.st 
week or two. New members are (doming 
m very fast. Six will be initiated at the 
next meeting. The new officers deserve 
some of the credit for this new infusion 
of life into the order. The 
sick benetits derived from this 
society have been greatly appreciated of 
late, several of the members being on 
the sick list, and drawing sums varying 

from :*1.^ \n S'")-^ n-.^alrl<- 



per- 



A Phenomenal Bank .Statement. 
New York, Jan. 25. -The weekly state- 
ment of the .Associated banks shows the 
following changes: 

aes^Tvp. inere** r,2M).K5 

i''^ ■ •'^ 8.277.71.) 

fj; , . •'^ 7.a6.«IJU 

Jfi- r:?, iocreaae »*4qi«i 

^pwit^. increase 3.7i<t'Miin 

Circulation, dsc-rease ■;.■; siltiou 

The banks now hold $15,031,650 in ex- 
cess of the 25 per cent rule. 

^'•w York .Stock*. 

The following are closing prices on the 

W* W BUlTo)*^''^^*® ^ reported by 

Today. 
Chicago. BurllnfrtoD 4 Qulncj 107^ 
American Cotton Oil - 

Missouri Haciac 

Nortbern Piiciflc preferred 

Chica^fo. Miliraukee It St. Paul 

Suirar Trust 

Gaj* Trust 

LpuisvUie i Xashville. ".' 

Chicago & Xorih western 

Rfxk Island 

Lake Shore i!'!!!""'''''' 

Heading '''.'.'.'. "" ' 

Tenn. coal and iroai 

Richmond Terminal... 

Atchi-ion 

Delaware & t.acka'wanjia.' 

J»ew EoKland 

I«adTru8t.... 

Western I nion..I... 

Union Paciac. . . 

WiacoDsln Central ." 



Howard's Candidacy. 

Ben Howard is showing surprising 
strength in the Second ward. Although 
on the independent ticket it is quite 
likely that he will be elected. Mr. How- 
ard is a good business man, and will 
make a good alderman. Mr. Howard 
has served in the city legislature before, 
and his record while in that body was 
everything that could be desired. 



■ 75?, 

. m% 

■ 6H1.4 
. 47 

inn 

Vlii 

» 

32 >i 
137?, 

46 ti 

21H 



. «7H 
. 36 
■1«« 



V'ester- 
day. 
107S 

75>-.c 

47 

H% 
111?* 
97 

Kfi'i 
3»', 
^>\ 
21 ?i 
32?. 
137 Si 
45H 
21\ 

Hh 

34H 
lOS^i 



THE GREAT NORTHERN. 

Tlie Ka:>tern ^Minnesota Be Continued An 

Independent Orsanixation. 

President Minot of the Eastern Min- 
nesota, is in the city. Said he to a re- 
porter: 

'•The new company will probably in- 
clude all the properties owned by the 
Manitoba company, except the Eastern 
Mmnesota and the Northern steamship 
company. These, I think, will continue 
under their own names because of the 
pecuhar nature of their business, and 
the fact that financial under- 
takings by either company could be 
the better carried out. The Eastern 



from j<15 to 825 weekly 

The installation rttual by Willis A. 
Gorman Relief Corps, No. 45. was re- 
hearsed by the members last week. The 
by Mrs. Mil ham, 
past president of the department of Min- 
nesota Womans Relief Corps, on the 22d 
inst. Mrs. Lydia George, the depart- 
ment president, was also present ahd at- 
tended to closing up the business of the 
corps for 1889. 

The contract for decorating the new 
Masonic hall will be let within two 
weeks. 

Ex-Commander Norris and N. A. Gear- 
hart went to .\itkin last Tuesdav even- 
ing to install the newly -elected ' officers 
of the Aitkin Post, G. A. R After the 
installation of the post, which has thirty- 
three names on its roster, was presented 
with a fine silk banner. At the conclu- 
sion of the presentation the Womans 
Relief Corps gave the post and visitors a 
banquet. 

Willis A. Gorman Post is on the look- 
out for new quarters. Its lease of Odd 
Fellows hall has ex{)ired, and that society 
will not give a renewal and allow the 
post to give camp tires in the room. As 
the post derives its main support from 
these entertainments, it will not renew 
the lease. The post will probably rent 
the quarters now occupied by the 
Masons in the Hayes building, as Bo<jn 
as the society moves to its new building. 



[Notice that all city letters put in the 
Duluth postoffice must have two cents 
prepaid, otherwise The Herald will not 
receive the guesses, for it will not pay 
postage on "guess" letters.] 

How many inhabitants has Duluth ? 
That is a question for the readers of The 
Herald to answer. By '-Duluth" is meant 
the city proi>er. West Duluth, Lakeside 
and Lester Park, all to all intents and 
purposes parts of the city. 

The Herald proposes to make it an 
object for its readers to guess as to the 
number of people in the city and the 
three adjoining suburbs mentioned 
above. In brief. The Herald will oflFer 
prizes to the two persons guessing the 
number or nearest the number of 
inhabitants shown by the returns 
of the census enumerators. The Herald 
will give to such successful guessers two 
cash prizes, 

First Prize 1>.">0 in Gold. Second Prize $85 
in Gold. 

Guesses will be received at this office 
until the day when the enumerators of 
the census begin their work. 



W EST EN D. 

Pollticfi Boll There Today and There Isn't 
Much KUe of News. 

Mr. Siverts, whose delegates were 
elected in the Sixth, is a man whom the 
people of the ward can rely upon. This 
Mr. Hubbard himself has even acknowl- 
edged. A Sixth warder this morning 
said: "If Siverts and Hubbard l)oth 
run, some democract like Thomas Perry 
will be elected." The News this morn- 
ing states that a very enthusiastic meet- 
ing was held last night for the purpose 
of placing W. M. Hubbard as an inde- 
pendent candidate. The truth is that 
the few who held the "large and enthu- 
siastic" meeting were only men who felt 
that they had been somewhat slighted. 
There will be a race held at Twentieth 
avenue rink tonight to determine the 
championship of the West End. Those 
who take part are Messrs. Borngedser, 
Gustavson, Limburg, Sundquist and 
Johnson. This will only be the first out 
of a series of three to be held at the 
same place. 

Henry Kirehhan, the cigar manufact- 
urer, is out again after a very severe 
attack of typhoid fever. 

C. O. Nelson, the Fifth ward candidate, 
has received the endorsement of the 
labor party. 

T. D. Craig will be an independent 
candidate from the Fifth ward. He has 
the support of the young business men. 
The Paragrai>her comes out this after- 
noon supporting J. K. Shaw for 



o 
o 

€9 

(£ 
111 
o 
cc 
O 

O 

I- 

co 

I- 
z 
< 

Q. 



M GREtT SOIFICE M 






Will continue I ifteen Days-until stock is re- 
duced. Cost or worth cuts no figure WE 
MUST REDUCE, even at ag?^at loss 
Our low prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business .Existence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides 
you would not stop to read them, but will quote 
a lew to give yc^u an idea. 

S7,49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat 
worth at least $15. 

$9.47 buys ai Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat 
worth at least $ I 8. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, ^Underwear, 
Furnishing Goods. No reserve We must reduce 
our stock at least $15,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mild v^eather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us to^take^the loss. nCall and 
o ur prices. ■ -^^ ^^ 



see 



M.f S.IBURROWS?& CO: 



o 
o 

id 

Ui 
Q 
CC 

O 

O 

K 

00 

K 



co 



mayor. 



CHURCH SERVICES. 



PIONEER POEL Cfl„ 




SIXTEENTH 



WBATHER FORKCA.ST. 

Jan. 24. —Forecast /"or Duluth and 
vicinity for 24 houm cummencinQ 10 a.m. 
today: Warvier; light .<inow. 

Observer, Signal OflSce. 



Population Content Coupon. 

My prue^s as to the numlicr of inhaliitams 
in I>ulutb. West Duiutb, Laikeside rtnd 
Lester Park to be shown by returns of the 
i-ensus enuuieraiors In the summer of li^HO 
IS as follows: 

Whole number of inhabitants — 



Endion Baptist church, Second street near 
Tenth avenue east— Geo. F. Hilton, piwior 
Servict> Sunday morning and eveuiuir at the 
u.sual hours. Sunday school at noon. All are 
welcome. 

First Presbyterian church. Kev. A. VV. Riuif- 
laiid, D. 1).. pastor— Morning .-iorvlce. 10:30 
L-"Hi^*-o '"Kevision of the Confession of 
faith- Sabbatu school at l:i; V. p. s. C. E nt 
8:Jp. No night service The congregation will 
unite with the other congregations In the 
temperance meeting at the Te 



ave- 



><auie of gnesfier— 



Residence of guesiter — 



Date, Jan. 25, 180O. 



Cut out this coupon, make your guess unon 
it and send It to Tfa- Daily Herald. All ^S 
must l>e made on this coupon. On! v one guets 
allowed to a single coupon. In case" there sbail 
tx- two or more answers of the same numlier 
which nuuilRT Is nearest or ne.\t to nearest 
that returned by the enumerators, then the 
winnei-8 shill be. in either case, the ones whose 
coupons bear the earliest date. 

Address all answers to 

"Guess ' care The Daily Herald 
I'uluth, Minn. 



emperance meeting at the Temple Oiiera. 
St. Pauls Episi-opal church, corner take i 
nue and s;ccond street, Hcv. William M. Uurker 
rector. Holy communion, Ma. m.; Sunday 
school, 10 a. m.: morning service and sermon 
11 a. m.; evening service and sermon, T.;i() p. m. 
Mr. Uarker will preach both morning and 
evening. " 

At the Pilgrim Congregational church the 
pastor expects to preach at the morning ser- 
vice at ]0:.W. Bible school at noon. Voung 
Peoples society at 0:40. No preaching service 
m the evening on account of the Burdiok 
meeting in the Operr House. 

,n'l*>"'°'~'"'; ^-^ '^"'tcr, Pustor-Leud-a-Hand. 
10:3i) a. m. Sundaj school, 3 p. m. ~ 
senicc omitted Itocauseof the 
rally at the 0|)era house. 
Wednesday g p. m. 
Elder 



COAL 



CROSS CfiEEK LEHIGH, 

FREE BURNING, 

ANIHRACIIE L BIIUMINOUS, 



Semi-ilnnual Red Figure M Down Sale ! 



s reduced 



of buying our best 



Think 



Evening 
tempt ranee 
Gospel meeting 



i..^'"^'^'."''','*' Elder Forties will preach at the 
J-irst Methodist church tomorrow morning 

A union (emperance meeting, in which the 
MethiMlist, Congregational. Baptist and Preslty- 
terlans will unite, will be held at Temple Opera 
tomorrow evening. 

African Methodist Episcopal church— Ser- 
vices at Ingalls hall. Superior streit. Preach- 
ing, 11 a. m.; 8abl)ath school. 3 p. m.; preach- 
mg, 8:15 p. m. Kev. S. B. Jones, pastor 

RtAL ESTATE. 




CONNELLSVILLE 
M GAS HOUSE 



M WOOD h-^'l ^"1'^ 3"'' '^'i''''f6"'s Ovefcoats at Cost Prices. 

much less than the actual value of the goods ^ '* 



mm PBOMPTLy DELiy[fi[o 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



Office: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Superior St. 

YARD: 



Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Garfield Avenur 
Rices Point. 




Mrs. 



A New Vlollnlfit. 

Yens Hartvig Flaaten, a voung Nor- 
wegian violinist of unusual 'ability, has 
ootne to Duluth with the intention ^ 
•~-;;jlg here. Mr. Flaaten hails from 
Kapids, UiBconein, where he 
AN'""f,^^' '^^'^ ^® ^a» gi^en several 
•n W ificonsin, where he attractetl 
.•ntion. He proposeB to give a 



Minnesota will not only retain its name, 
but also Its present organization. The 
Manitoba will be benefited by the 
change because its through line will be 
under one name, thus removing all 
chances of a number of complications. 

I>eath of .Mrs. Wells. 

o ,Tr^^"®" ^^- ^^'e'is, wife of Major 
Guy Wells, died at her home, 136 Sixth 
avenue west, early this morning, after a 
stiort but severe illness. Mrs. Wells 
^aves three children, two of whom, Mrs. 
Charles L. Codding and K. R. Welle 
live in Duluth, while another married 
daughter resides in St. Paul. She had 
hosts of friends in Duluth, all of whom 
mourn her loss. 

\x^u^ -n"^?^ °' '*^« late Mrs. Guy 
W ells will take place tomorrow afternoon 
from St. Paul church, corner I^ke ave- 
nue and Second street at 2:,30 o'clock. 
*■ nends of the family are invited. 



An Ol 



e in the near future. 



editor 
ator. 



*^ur , Minneapolis Clos«. 

^\i^ 25.-Clo9tng quotatlon»- 
'<.anuary, 78H; February, :».«; 
have long .'rack, .9. No. J northern 

In the flusf.^'"S'L';^;, Jf*= «*y- •«^: "n 

„i ». , "5-^ northern, January. T3i»- 

when the fiitTT: on track. TB. ^' 

Ckicaco Clone. 

CmCAOO. Jan. 25 — 1:16 p. m. oloae-WTiBat 
«wy: Januarpr.T.S-i: May. T»" Oo?^ steldv- 
January, »^^; May, 31;^. *>"">. steady. 



The PoHteo. 

The Swedish Publishing & Printing 
company has been organized with a cap 
ital stock of ?10,.10(.). It will publish The 
Duh.th Weekly Posten. The company 
today lx.ught for »-.'J0(. The Fadernes I 
landet, ai:d will take ixjPs^ssion Feb j ' 
The paper will be greatly strengthened ! 
and improved 1 he officers are: Prtsi- ' 
v:®?Ht^,/' Swanatrom; vice-president,' 
Nils Hall; .secretary, Louis Rietz; troa«- 
urer. Dr. J. .J. Eklund. These tosf^ther ' 
with (J. W. Kenard. Gust Bergquist and • 
h erdmand L. Engberg are directors. i 



Charles A. Golden, the barber of 348 
J^ike avenue, has sold today to Otto E 
Sengebusch of L'Anse, Mich., for the 
consideration of 8200. Mr. Golden will 
leave on Sunday evening for Seattle, 
VVashington state. May success follow 
nim. (jive the new barber a trial. 

Mendennall & Hoopes have a quantity 
of money which they can loan iu small 

tT«^"?^/**^ ^f '^«°*- ^^^^ ^°<i see 
inem before making your loan. 

Mendenhall & Hoopes h"ave a large 
ifii t ^?^*'* ■ P'-operty which they can 
sell at a bargain. Call and see them be- 
fore making your purchase. 



At the Banquet. 

The Bums banquet last night at the 
St. Louis was one of the pleasantest 
affairs ever held in Du4uth. A full pro- 
gram was published in The Herald yes- 
terday. The company of :W0 filled the 
large dining hall, marching in procession 
behind a piper. 

-\fter the banquet had been concluded 
Chief Simon Clark made a happv and 
neatly-turned opening address. in his 
remarks he said: "The growth of the 
clan in this city is greater than that of 
any other in the countrj-. The Scotch 
have simply tried to keep pace with the 
other improvements of the city, and be- 
fore another year is passed I hojie that 
the name of every worthy Scotchman 
vvill be enrolled. What better proof of 
the growth of the city can there be than 
this gathering tonights" He detailed the 
successes of a few sons of Scotia in the 
city. A duet followed, after which Mrs. 
t ranklin Paine sang a soprano solo and 
Master Chalmers recited with remark- 
able expression for one so young. Several 
toasts were responded to eloquentlv, 
among which were one on "Burns" bv 
Colin Campbell, and on "Our Adopted 
Country" by Ronald M. Hunter. Mrs. 
R. G. Mackenzie sang "Tam Glen" and 
Chief Doran a tenor solo. Robert 
Crombie resiionded cleverly and titly to 
the toast of "The Ladies." 

After singing "Auld Lang Syne," the 
party repaired to the old diningroom, 
where the dances of the day and of old 
Scotia held the attention of all. The 
hall was neatly decorated, on tiie wall 
being the word Burns made of plaid 
scarfs by J. Staples in a handsome 
device. 



>l •>■ Serve as a Guide. 

In order to give data that is of interest and 
may Ix" of value. The Herald reprints the fol- 
lowing fnim the directory report oi 18.S9 but 
it mu»i be remcmbereil that this paper' does 
not vouch for th- accur.icy of the opinions set 
torth or the Uifurea given. In fact it will be 
well to recollect that the oniinarv directory 
nguren and estimates are most alwavsCiiadded 
sometimes fearfully, and must usually be 
scaleii down very materially. These are the 
directory statements: 

I his volume contains 3,3<W more names than 
the la.st issue; a total of 16.:a) adult citizens of 
Duluth; this sum multiplied l>y 2\, the factor 
which has Ix-en found to truthfully represent 
the women aim children not include<l in the 
list, lndic:acs a population of W,,»iO for Du- 
luth. a gain of lO.UUU inhabitants within a year 
an. 1 the prediction is ventured that if a lull' 
comiilote and accurate count Iwj made by ex- 
perienced and competent canvassers, nearlv 
6 i,U«) souls will be found within the 
rate limits of Uuluth In im). 

Population by Years. 

ISH), United .States census 

lf<^5, state census 

lf*8, directory estimate ....',! 

1N?7, directory estimate !!!!!'."] 

l(i>*, directory estimate '..'.'.'.."" 

1*>H, directory estimate 



A Record of the Keal Kstate Transfers for 
9* Hours Ending at Noon. 

W W Paddock to J G Scarlett, swV of 

seV. 3:1-60-1.") . 12000 

G H Smith to Jas .V Barlow. 1 3, li'lk 4() 



corpo- 



160 

10 

luO 

800 



Mungers 
16, 16,' b'lk 



3,470 

i8.aio 

22,000 
30,UUO 
37,1100 
47,900 



KImberley & Strykers add. 

H H Myers to S .S Williamson, 1 14, 15, iil, 

blk Itio, W D, Fifth 

J C Holllday to K .Starveth, part of 1 177 

179, blk iiH. Second . .. ' 

W L Ass to F H Edwards, 156, 68, 60. 62 

blk 1T8. Third .' 

A C Ely to tieorge F Piper, 1 1, 2. 3.' i' fi 

6,7,8. blk 2; 11,2,3. (ilk 3. 

Buhdlvlslon 

J J Earley to McRae part 1 

117. W n. Fifth..... 

John Wllkson to G T Johns, sw^ of "ne 

MI Co to JNashiud, w^i'ofll3, bl'ki*. 
Tower 

Scllwood Land Co to C (3 Giddlngs i' 24 
blk 14, Sellwood 

F E Goddard to tYederlc Prentice. 1 6 
and 7, Bay Front, flrst re-arrange- 
ment ] 

L Mendenhall to fYed B Goddard, same 1 

12 transfers; consideration^.- Ml,937 



66,000 

1,300 

1.140 

30O 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

— .\NU— 

INSURANCE. 



Rooms 1 , 2, Exchange BIdg. 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



Mortgage Sale. 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



LOANS MADE 



-AT- 



175 



SUPERIOR TRANSFERS. 



DISTRICT COURT. 



Two 

sec 



Acres. 

15-^-lT '° ^"'heast corner swJi, 



To Make Mineral Paint. 
Col. J B. Geggie of thiscitv, whoowns 
iron lands in 20-.-i9-14, on the Mesabi 
range, has a rich deposit of oxide of iron 
which he has had examined by experts 
in different parts of the country, who 
unite in saying it is very rich in mineral 
paint and will produce more and better 
paint than any other in the country. 
Col. Geggie has decided to erect a paint 
factory here in the spring to manufacture 
the paint 



Sentences of Convicted Prisoners: Re<^ord 
of the Cases. 

Judge Stearns has made the following 
set of cases: 

•V'?."'l''y: Cornelia Wolff vs. Duluth Termi- 
nal K«"l waj- ; 1.57' ,. similar case ; Charles Stark 
\s. Hubbard &\inceut;.Iohu Leja vs. Gas ii. 

rS ' *^'up:"i.v: John Matscm vs. Same 

Tuesday: Criminal— .-^tate vs. Skola; State 
vs. Janzig; August Keinke vs. L. H. Zastmw 

Woduesilav: Civil-Chas. L Codding v-; Gi.s 
& Water Company;. Julius Kesseler S Co. vs. 
Luding Strohtiorb; Eliot Ix)rd vs. City 

Thursday: Cliamber of Commerce vs. H C 
^,e»''^.':^'''.iirlotte L.Wilis vs B. Summersi 
{•red W .Smith vs. H. U . Pearson, receiver; J 
n. Novcs vs. lluntn-ss & Brown; F. W. Mor- 
ritt vs. Nicolas J. ..iller. 

Friday: Amory vs. Bailey: Little 
Slmonds; Haynes vs. City; H. R. L<jng 
Eiwtern Bail way; F. D. West vs Same. 

iMituiday: John Shellenl>erger vs. Eastern 
Hallway; .M. CTombler vs. E Ingalls; Ih^^^^r- 
ng \- Cu. vs. W. I). Cross; John Kusnelrak 
County Commissioners; B. M. Bntton vs. 

piu-^V^i'^ii ^''''hael Rpmraels vs. Max Shapiro: 
Ella J. sellers vs. Nelson Sellers; W. L. Ass^ 
ciation vs. DuhilhTcrininHl Kailwiiy; 1 v D 
Heard vs. Same; George Wethcrby vs. Jainoii 



List of Douglas County Transfers For the 
Past 34 Hours. 

Furnished by W. W. Sanford &Co., abstract- 
•rs of titles for Douglas county. Wis., room 3 
Norrls-McDougall block, Duluth. 
Land & Hiver Improvement company 

to Erick Beckraan, 1 27, blk 168, W 

Sup., Sixth « jw) 

James H Harper to B T Kandail, f 3 4nd 

4, blk 4, S Sup., First 750 

Anders Peterson to E H Hobe, wVi of 



e4ofnwi4of ne '4, 14-18-14 

Joseph F Merrlani to T F Bingham. 1 27 

and 28. blk 27. S Sup., First 
Joseph F Merriam to Josepii Wardman, 

I « and 7. blk 28, 8 Sun., First 
Joseph F Merriam to Nils Anderson, i 

8 and !•, blk 28. 8 Sup., First .... 
Achille H Bertrand to Lewis Weber 

und 4-7 1 1, 2, 3. 4, 6, blk 23, Sup city. ..' 

7 transfers, total 



],.500 
40U 
400 
400 

4,000 



te,350 



V8. 

vs. 



vs- 



P"'ive acres, sec. 13.50-14. 



I am offering a few good bargains in 
residence lots near where the flouring 
mills are to be built. J. A. Bonos, 

3-J FarguBon Building. 



Highest of all in Leavening Power.— U. S. Gov't Report, Aug. 17, 1889. 



Notice the new bargains offered 
M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



Notice the new bargains offered 
M. Root A Co. 's ad. 



in J. 



in J. 




Baking 



The convicted prisoners were brought 
up and received sentences as follows- 
Joseph K. Gorseline, assault in the 
second degree, fined «2ri0 or impris<in- 
ment not to exceed four months; John 
Connors, grand larceny in second degree 
state reformatory; Joseph Krause, grand 
larceny m second degree, state reform- 
atory; John B. Vallaincourt, grand 
larceny in second degree, state reform 
atory; John Courtney, grand larceny in 
hrst degree, Stillwater jirison five years 
ami four years; William Harring- 
toii, petit larceny. lined $100 
or imprisonment not to exceed IX) days- 
William J. McCrary, forgery in second 
degree, Stillwater prison six months- 
Ihonias Connors, petit larceny, thirty 
days in county jail; James Riley, grand 
arceny second degree, Stillwater prison 
Ifteen months; Mike Banack, selliog 
h.iuor to minors, SCO fine. In the case of 
ij<jui8 Murray for keeping a gambling 
den argument was going on as to whether 
eentence should be imposed or not. 



ABSOLUTECir PURE 1 



Unitarian literature furnished free 
H'on application at Room D, Hunter 

'■ior.k. 



THE S ALT T RUST. 

Business Men Disc-usH ll>e Discrimination 
in Salt Prices .^gainst Duluth. 

A meeting of business men was held 
at the Chamber of Commerce this morn- 
ing to discuss the discriminaCTBn in price 
against Duluth and in favor of interior 
p<jint8 by the Salt trust. A. Hersch, 
who called attention to the unjust 
methods of the trust, was present and 
gave the-Chamber committee some im- 
portant facts. 

The price of salt, in car-load lots, is 
81.25, while the same salt can be pur- 
chased elsewhere near Du'.uth for 72 
cents, a difference against Duluth of KJ 
cents. One of the business 

men present thought he could buy salt 
cheaper than $1.25, but upon telephon- 
ing to Cutler & Gilbert, the answer 
"j?1.25 in car-load lots" came back. 

As an exi>eriiuent Mr. Hirsch pur- 
chased a car hjad of salt in A.shland 
recently. He sold it for twenty-five cents 
less than it is being sold for here, and 
then paid twenty-five cents a barrel 
freight. The Chamber of Commerce 
committee will confer with salt dealers 
in this city and see if something cannot 
be done to remedy this evil. 



Default having be«Mi made in the payment 
of thesumof three tiundied and sixty fio-ioo 
dollars, initio iAt-im prinoipal and inU^rest which 
IS claimed to be due at the date of this notice 
upon a certain mortgage duly executed and 
delivered by l-rank Doyle, a bachelor.toJam, s 
B. Howard and Alexander H. Davis, bearing 
date the tenth day of November. A. D 1KS« 
and duly recorded In the office of the register 
ol deeds in and for the county of Saint Louis 
and state of Minnesota, on the 12ih day of 
iNovember A. D. 18f^, at 9oclocka. m. In 
b.x)k "3« of mortgages, on page 2«2; and no 
action or proceeding ai law or otherwise hav- 
ing bj-en Instituted ui rec-over the debt se- 
cured by said mortgage, or any part thereof: 

>ow, therefore, notice is herel)y given that 
by virtue of a |K)wer of sale contained in said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute In such 
ca.«e made and provided, the said mortgage 
will be foreclosed, and the premises descrlt)ed 
in and covered by said mortgage, viz : Lots 
numbered six («), seven (7) and eight iSi and 
the northeai^t quarter (nei») of the southeast 

;i.Vv'"''n'"."^.'*' "*' ?*?^H?° "umberod twenty-two 
(£:>, all in township No. sixty-one (till north of 
range >o. twelve (12) west of the fourth i4tli) 
principal meridian. In St. Ix)ul9 county, and 
state of Minnesota, with the hereditaments and 
appurtenances, will be s<jld at public auction, 
to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said debt 
and interest, and the taxes (If anv) on said pn-m- 
ises. and twenty-flve dollars, attorney's lees 
as stipulated in and by said mortgage in case 
of loix'closure, and the disbursements allowed 
by law; which sale will be made by the sheriff 
of said St. Louis county, at the front door of 
the court house, in the city of Duluth. in said 
county and stat*-, on the 2»th day 
of January, A. D. 1880, at 10:3(1 o'clock a m on 
that day. suliject to redemntlon at any time 
within one year from the day of sale, as pro- 
vided by law. '^ 

Dated December l.Sth, A. D. 188». 

Jamks B. Howaro, 
and 
„ „ ,. Alexander H. Davis, 

K. N. Marble, Mortgagees. 

Attorney. 
Deo. 14-21-28. Jan 4-11-18-2B. 



6 AND 

M01Sr;EY ON 

JON E S 



7 PER CENT. 

HA-ND -NO DELA-Y. 



-:-&-:- BR AC E, 

Real Estate and Loans, 
409 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 



REPORT OF THE CONDITION 



OF THE — 



BANK Ol" WEST DOLUTH 

In the State of Minnesota, at 
the close of business on the 
18ti day of Janu- 
ary, 1890. 



RKSOUKCES. 

Loans and disccunts... 

Overdrafts 

Due from other banks" ;;;.i.'..V. 

Sale, furnitures and fixtures 

Current expensss . 

Cash Reservt:— 

Legal tender no «8 and Nat 



.. .144,600 92 
leo 91 
. . . 6,039 60 
... 1,425 00 
... 1,983 14 




I 



1882. 



Hotels, llestaufants, 



-AND- 



currency. 
Practioual 



nickels 



ai curnmcy, 

and cents 

Specie, viz : gold coin .'.'.'..'. 

" SllviTCOln 



LIABILITIES. 



3,680 00 

13 01 
730 00 
273 00 



4,686 01 



»68,8U6 68 



Mortgage Sale. 



DEFAULT HAVING BEEN MADE IN THE 
flf. •^'iJi'iJi'.'". \>f^^ef>um of three hundred 
flftc-en nO-lU) dollars (W15 50), principal and 
interest, which Is claimed to be due at the date 
of this notice upon a certain mortgage, duly 



Capital 8t<ick pal i in 825 000 00 

Undivided profits, viz.: interest and 
exchange 2 21fi -*» 

Individual depoiits subject 

to check... 829,296 03 

Demand certiflcites of de- 
posit l^og^ ig 

Time certificates of deposit. '. 1,'200 00 

31,689 IP 



TAKE NOTICE I 

We are agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



to8,806 68 



upoi 
executed and delivered by Francis X! Parent 
and Mary K. Parent, his wife, to Henry F, 

iV.*-! J.IJ;'''''"/.'^?'*' ''*'«- seventh day of June, 
A. u. lK4t, and duly ret^orded in the office of 
the regi.sterof deedsin and tor the county of 
M. lAJuls, and sUite of Minnesota, on the 



£, Hobert CromMe. cashier of The Bank of 

West Duluth. Mnn.. do solemnly swear that 

the above statem snt is true to the best of my 

knowledge andlelief. "• "i* 

R. Crombie, Cashier. 

Correct Attest : 
a. f. iswanstk0> , 
Fkeeman Keen. 



The Best in the World. 



Get our prices and vou will be uer- 
fectly satisflod. 



19 West Superior Street. 



I' Directors . 



Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives auuiirate and prompt attention at 
The lUnild Jol) ritKiius. 



SW>4 of nwi(, sec. 7-50-13. 

E. W. Makkell. 

If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



Ileal KHlute and InNurance. 

If you wish to invest in real estate or 
insure your prope-ty, call and see Men- 
denhall & Hoopes, as they have the 
Iart,'est li&t of real estat*' and write in- 
surance in the best eomiianies repre- 
sented iu the cilv. 




For Ladies. Special classes every after- 
noon at Parsons' Business College, sec- 
nd floor. 



eighth day of Juno A. D. 18«». at 8 o'clock and 
10 minutes, A. M., In Book 41 of Mortg.iges <m 
page ()., and no action or proceeding at law 
or otherwise having l>een instituted to ivcover 
the debt secured by said Mortgage, or any nart 
thei-eof: 

Now therefore, notii-e Is herebv given, that 
by virtue of a power of sale contained in said 
mortgage, and pursuant to the statute in such 
case made and provided, the said Mortgage- 
will be foreclosed, and the premises described 
In and covered by said mortgage, vlz- 

l.ots throe to) and four (4), of .>iection eighteen 
(IH), and lot (;t). of section nineteen (ill), all 
in township sixty-three (H3), north of range 
twelve (I2». west of the 4th principal meridian 
In M. IxMils county, and state of Minne- 
lioUi, with the h( redltaments anil appur- 
tenances\ will be sold at public auction, 
to the highest bidder for cash, to pay said 
debt and Inu^rest, and the taxes, if" any 
on said premises, and twenty-live dollai-* 
attorney's fee. as stipulated In and bv 
said mortgage in case ol lorct losurc.and the 
disbursements allowed by law; which sale will 
be made by the sherllT . f said St. Louis 
t-ounty. at the fi-ont door of the Court Hou-ie 
In the city of Duluth in said ixnintv iin<i state' 
on the -".ith day of January. A. D. IWHj, at 10 
o<l<icka. ni. of that day. subject to rodemi>- 
lipn at any time within one year from the day 
of sale, as prtivided bv law 
Dated December 13th, A. D. 1889. 
Henkv F 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, I 
CocNTv or St. IO018. 1 



88. 



Humphreys 



Sworn to and sul.scribod before me this 24th 
day of January, 11190. ^"id «*ia 

ISeal.] 2. H Austin 

Notary Public St. Louis county, Minn. 



K. N. Marble, 

Attorney. 
Deo. 14-81-28, Jan. 4-11-18-26. 



Davis, 
Mort^ragee. 



STATE OF MINN SSOTA. I 

CotJNTV OF St. 1 .OITIS. f *^ 

District Court, Eleventh Judicial District. 

In the matter of the estate of Prank DlandreH. 
J^l^^f Or^e-tor limiting tliiret^^'flu; 

Upon reiullng aid filing the netition nf 
Simon Clark, receiver In the abo?^ ent?tl^ 

c^redH-'-rsof Fru.flT V^f '".^ ♦" th^^uTu^t 
crcdit«jrsol irunk Diandrea are required to 

msc'Sd^Sr^'''"'''''-"'''^ "> '^""-- 

o» «VlTl v.^.!^l°^' '^ ,'* oir^ered that all creditors 
olsald Jiink Diandrea desiring to participate 

liereby required, to file their duly executed 
eleases with the Clerk of the DL'^trict Court of 
.ii^v.^''-'^'*^'i*i'.*'"^'c!al District on or iK-foi-e the 
•*rth aiiy of Jehruaiy, A. D. 1890. 

....hif Vl"** .V""'^^' '"' '•''« order be given, by 
publishing the jsamo three times within five 
days from the da e hereof, In The Duluth 
bveniug Herald, i nd by mailing a copy of 
this notice to each < f the known creditors of 
said Frank Diandre I. 
Dated Duluth, Mliin., Jan. 23rd, A. D 1890 
lly the Court, 
O. P. Stkahns, Judge. 



Dr. Hi :>u"hkkvs'.si-k> in.s are sctentlflcallT and 
carefully prepand i.ri'wriptlons ; used for many 
years in private jiraitko with 8ucce88,aii<lforOTer 
tlilrt y years used by the people. Every single Spe- 
clfl<^ts a specia 1 eure for the disease named. 

These .Speclflcs cure without drogKlng Donr 
Ing or re<luplnK the system, and arein fSot and ' 
deed the t iovereign reme diea of tke World. 

UST OF PWXCIPAI, K08. CTREB. 

FeTers, Congestion. Inflammation... 
tVornis, \S orm Fever, Worm Colic 
C'ryiua <ollc, or Teething oflnfanta 
lliarrhea, of Children or Adults 
Dysentery* Griping, Bilious CoUc'.' 
Cholera niorbua. Vomiting.. 
7 Coaghs, Cold, Bronchitis. .TT... 
H Nenraiiria, Tootbadie, Fat^ache '" 
9 Headache*. SIckHeadache, Vertlio 
10 pFspepsia, Bilious Stomach. 

I.i ^.^JPR'**^**^ ?»*»X"' Perloiii; 
t'i M nitea, too Profuse Periods 




22 kr'nary Weakne«a, Wettlnir R.'^i 
Sold by D 



I F I C ^ . 




t- 



■2^ lomWi Bi 



BWrtrr*^ 



--^ 



*■ 



• ^^^^-*»^ 



+4- 




m 



■• 



<iaiBi 



A 


Lot 


on Central Avenue, 


in 


Block 1 1 , 


for $3300, 


for 


a fe 


w days 








E. C. 


HOLLIDAY. 






Hotel St. Louis Bidg. 



DULUTH EVENING 




A large list of Endion division 
l^ts cheap. 

fE. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 W. Stiperlor Street. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILDING. 



VOL.. 7; :N0. 253. 



DULUTH. MINN.. MONDAY. JANUARY 27, 1890. 



PBICE THREE CENTS. 



IK THE RICHT DIRECTION AND YOU WILL MAKE MONEY. 




> I 



WEHAV 




TO SELL! 



4ni 



HERE IS A SAMPLE I 

Southwest quarter of northwest quarter Section 
18-50-14, $130 per acre. Land within 1-4 
mile sold about 6 months ago for $225 per 
acre and held now at $300 per acre. The 
building of the Incline Railroad by the High- 
lani Improvement Co. will make this land 
Nvo"" h $200 per acre. 



HERE'S ANOTHER. 

Southeast quarter Section 15-50-15 at $40 per 
acre. Acres in Northeast quarter Section 
I 4-50- 1 5 just sold for $65 per acre. 



SOME SPECIAL BARGAINS IN LOTS IN 
LUTH PROPER. CALL OR WRITE. 



DU- 




MONEY TO LOAN! 



MORTGAGES BOUGHTI 



NO DELAY— MONEY ON HAND I 



/ 



i > 



Applications wanted at once, especially for 
$500, $800, $ I 000, $ I 500, $2000, $2400. 



Stryker, Manley & Buck. 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



O. H. GRAVES & CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1869. 



REAL 



ESTATE. 



We have a large list of choice Residence Lots, Acres, Business and Dock 
Property, of which we have exclusive control. 

-:- LOANS. -:- 

We negotiate loans in any amount on improved city property, and for par- 
ties wishing to build, at the lowest current rates of interest. 

INSURANCE. 

Our list of companies comprises some of the oldest and largest in exist- 
ance. We give special attention to the careful writing of policies and prompt 
and fair settlement of all losses. 




ROOMS 2, 3 AND 4, BOARD OF TRADE BLOQ, DULUTH, MINN. 




Sixteentli Semi-Jonual Red Figure Sale. 



BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S CLOTHING. 




Boys require, if anything, stronger and more carefully-made clothing than 
their fathers, for, as the mothers well know, the little fellows give their gar- 
ments harder usuage than the men, especially these days, when the boys spend all 
their time outside of school houses coasting. Our Boys' Clothing is thoroughly 
and reliably made from wear-resisitng fabric^, and will stand lots of knocking 
about, that all youngsters give their clothes, and now that our RED FIGURE 
SALE IS IN PROGRESS our always reasonable PRICES ARE LOWER THAN 
EVER. 

Boys' and Children's Overcoats -We are able to offer some big bargains 
in Overcoats, as now is our clearing up time. We've put prices on them that 
will surely make them move. 

!ouths' and Men's Clotliing at Red Figufe Prices. 




^iS])dim 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



DEMOCRATS WANT SHAW. 



John K. Shaw the Nominee of 

the Local Democrats 

for Mayor. 



He is Soon Placed in Nomina- 
tion by Acclaim Amid 
Cheers. 



Democrats Also Make a List of 

Aldermen They Will 

Vote For. 



There was every indication of har- 
mony in the ranks of the "unwashed" 
this afternoon at the democratic conven- 
tion. That great interest and enthusi- 
asm prevailed way very evident. Be- 
fore the doors were opened the corridors 
were crowded with a surging mass of 
humanity, and when Clerk Budden 
swung of)en the doors the room was 
packed in less than five minutes, every 
chair being filled and every available 
inch of standing room occunied. 

It was a cheerful crowd, more so than 
is usually found in a democratic conven- 
tion, every face wore a confi- 
dent smile, and Shaw's name 

as on every lip. Occasionally 
Some wit gained temjwrary fame by sug- 
gesting that "McCfinty" O. Hall was a 
dead duck, which sally provoked yells of 
laughter. 

It was not distinctively a democratic 
convention. There was a very fair 
sprinkling of republicans. The labor 
element was, the siinie as at the re- 
publican convention, conspicuous only 
by there being no representatives 
present. 

Chairman d' Autremont called the con- 
vention to order and read the call. T. 
T. Hudson nominated Capt. Jas. Farrell 
as temporary chairman, who was elected 
and took his seat. Mr. Kyan of the 
First ward was elected temporary secre- 
tary. A committee of one delegate for 
each ward was elected a committee on 
credentials. They were: Chas. Banks, 
First ward; C. d' Autremont, Second; A. 
M. Morrison, Third; T. T. Hudson, 
Fourth; John Dowling, Fifth; D. S. 
McLean, Sixth. 

Pending the deliberations of the com- 
mittee on credentials, the audience 
amused itself by discussing the situation. 
About every third man was smoking, 
which very soon had theetfectof making 
the atmosphere decidedly murky. Each 
face still wore the same gladsome smile. 
The democracy was in high feather, 
there was no doubt of it. 

The committee on credentials reported 
which report was formally adoj)ted. The 
committee on temporary organization 
was made permanent. 

Next came nominations for mayor. T. 
T. Hudson nominated J. K. Shaw, 
"a man of lil>eral views 

who will carrj- out your 
ideas, who is opposed to all jobs and 
steals, who will represent the whole 
ciiy." 

Mr. Truelsen seconded the nomin- 
ation and highly eulogized the candi- 
date. He is not a rich man, not a usur- 
ious money loaner, not one of those 
inhuman pirates who bo round seek- 
ing wtom they may devour, etc. 
C. d'Autremont also seconded Mr. Shaw, 
"We want a mayor that will be an honor 
to the city, who will see that the money 
paid by the city in taxes is properly 
expended. .\ny man, democratic, re- 
publican or prohibitionist may feel 
proud in voting for him. His record is 
open and abovel)oard." 

The nomination was made unanimous, 
by vociferous acclamation which could 
have been heard four blocks away. 
There were loud calls for Shaw, who was 
not to be found. C. d'Autremont and 
T. T. Hudson were appointed a commit- 
tee to find Mr. Shaw. 

The various wards announced their 
candidates for alderman in the following 
order: First ward — M. Sorenson, one 
year; Thomas Timlin, two years. Second 
ward — W. P. Himebaugh. Third ward 
— T. M. Helinski. Fourth ward -Robert 
Louden. Fifth ward— James L. Porter. 
Sixth ward— John Deleaske. 



THE BUI LDERS ARRIVE. 

DelegateH to the National Convention 
Arrive In St. Paul. 
St. Paul, Jan. 27. — Delegates to the 
national convention of builders, which 
opens here tomorrow, are arriving in 
large numbers. Among the cities repre- 
sented are Chicago, New York, Boston, 
Providence, Philadelphia, Baltimore, 
Cincinnati and Duluth. Among the 
most important questions to be dis- 
cussed by the convention is the propo- 
sition to secure the passage by congress 
of an interstate mechanics lien law, 
which shall be uniform in its operation. 
This is opposed by some of the delegates 
from the large cities. 



They iiay PillHbury Will Build. 

Mlvne-vpous, Jan. 27. — [Special.]— It 
is reported that C. A. Pillsbury is pre- 
paring to build large flour mills near 
Franklin avenue bridge in this city 
below the Falls of St. Anthony, and that 
he will develope a new water power. 



Ballot Box Fraud*. 

Washinoton, Jan. 27. — The special 
house committee appointed to investi- 
gate the Ohio ballot box forgery, re 
sumed its session to-day. Gov. Camp- 
bell will be examined this afternoon, and 
it is expected that the investigation will 
be concluded this week. 



Register Tomorrow. 



He LoHt HiH Stir. 



John Roberts and Police OfBcer Smith 
had a little scrap on Superior street last 
night. Roberts was intoxicated, and 
conducted himself in an offensive man- 
ner on the street. When the policeman 
remonstrated with him he became abu- 
sive, and when the ofiicer essayed to 
escort him to the lock-up, clinche<^] with 
him and began using his fists freely. 
After considerable rolling alxiut in the 
snow. Smith, with the assistance of 
Officer Ratly, got the belligerent tough 
into custody. Smith lost his star and 
several buttons in the melee. 



Roister Tomorrow. 



WILL SHE D MO RE LIGHT. 

Mrs. Maybrick'8 SympatbUers Oatherlut; 
New I>ata. 

London, Jan. 27.— Energetic sympa- 
thizers with Mrs. Maybrick have for 
months been engaged in collecting and 
enquiring into some verj material facts 
which were suppressed at the trial. The 
new evidence, it is said is of the most 
important character, and throws an en- 
tirely new complexion upon the case. 

Should it bear the test of the careful 
examination which it will necessarily re- 
ceive from the law officers of the crown, 
it is said that Home Secretary Matthews 
will have no course open to him, but to 
recomtueud the Queen to grant Mrs. 
Maybrick a free pardon. Matthews, 
however, is not very kindly disposed to- 
ward the prisoner, as is evidenced by 
the fact that he has refused the request of 
the Baroness Von Roque to be allowed to 
correspond with her daughter more often 
than permitted by the rules of the pri- 
son. 



liegister Tomorrow. 
KILLI 



SAIN- 



The Peach Crop ol Iowa Killed A|ptln. 
"AliHulutely" This Time. 

Keokuk, Iowa, Jan. 27. — The warm 
weather following the cold snap !m>s 
caused ice to start in the river here, and 
in its grinding movement it has wrecked 
the new government boom, 800 feet long, 
extending from the lower lock of Des 
Moines rapids canal to draw of bridge. 
Part of the boom, which may possibly be 
saved from destruction, was carried a 
considerable distance l>elow the bridge. 

Much alarm is felt by the fruit grow- 
ers in Lee county, and in fact all over 
this section, for the safety of the fruit 
crops. The remarkably mild weather of 
the fore part of the season has developed 
fruit buds to a dangerous degree, and 
the decided change of last week has 
wrought vast damage. There is abso- 
lutely no hope for the peach crop and 
the apple crop is possibly destroyed. 

WHISKY I NCOR PORATES. 

The Whitiky Tru»t I'euple ivill Incorpor- 
ate aM a Company. 
Chicago, Jan. 27. — The great wl isky 
trust of the United States is now con- 
trolled by five trustees elected by "cer- 
tificate holders." P. G. Hennessey, sec 
retary of the Chicago Distilling company, 
is one of these trustees. liegarding the 
intentions of the trust to incorporate 
under the laws of Illinois as one great 
company, in order to escape the penalties 
of anti-trust legislation, Mr. Hennessey 
says: "It is said that a meeting has 
been called for Feb. 11, to consider the 
advisability of changing the present 
organization into a corporation. The 
trustees held a meeting at Peoria last 
week and decided in favor of the plan." 

THIRTY DROWNED. 



A Britlith Steaiuer Lost and Many of Her 
Crew Killed. 

London, Jan. 27.— The British steamer 
IxK'h Moidart.Cajjt. Andrew, from Pisa- 
gua No. 2, to Hamburg, is ashore at Cal- 
lantsoog, Halland. Thirty of her crew- 
were washed overboard after she struck 
and all perishecL 

The British ship Janet Cowan, Capt. 
Livingston, before reported as having 
returned to Plymouth in distress, loat a 
number of |her sailors when off the Isle of 
Wight last Thursday. Five of her crew- 
were lost there. 



To £xcnlpate "Jennie" nud "Vic." 

Nkw Yokk, Jan. 27. -The anuounce- 
ment that Sir Francis Cook and Mr. 
John Biddulph Martin of Ix)ndon, the 
husbands ree{)ectively of Jennie Ciafiin 
and Victoria WoodbuU, have offered a 
reward of iJSOOO for information which 
will result in the arrest of the persons en 
gaged in a conspiracy to defame these 
ladies, has created a good deal of interest 
in this city, in certain circles of which 
Jennie Claliin and "Vic" Woodhull were 
once well known. Several of their friends 
have recently received a leaHet couched 
in somewhat obscene terms and refiect- 
ing upon their careers prior to their 
marriage. 



A Thieving Banker. 

Sioux City, Iowa, Jan. 27. — Indict- 
ments have been returned against Ed- 
ward L. Bradbury, president and cashier 
of the Bank of South Dakota, at 
Madison, and W. O. Bradbury, assistant 
cashier of the same bank, for obtaining 
money under false pretenses. 

The complaint was made by the Sioux 
National bank, this city, which cashed a 
draft a short time ago drawn by the 
Madison bank on a bank in Milwaukee. 
The draft came back protested, and it 
subsequently came out that the Madison 
bank had failed and fraud had been de- 
tected. The bank in this city managed 
to get property enough to almost make 
up its loss. Bradbury has been arrested. 

Register Tomorrow. 



WilhelmV Thirty-second. 
Berlin, Jan. 27.^Thi8 is the thirty- 
second birthday of the Emperor William, 
but in consequence of' the recent deatli 
of the Dowager Empress Augusta there 
was no national celebration of the event. 
There is, however, an interruption of 
twenty-four hours in the court mourn- 
ing, and this afternoon the Emperor 
gave a state dinner to a limited number 
of guests. No music, however, was 
allowed during the ceremonies, and the 
court mourning will be resumed tomor- 
row morning. 

Wonte Than Kvur. 
San Francisco, Jan. 27. — Railroad offi- 
cials at Sacramento succeeded in 
having communication for it short 
time last night with Truckee, 
the office on the eastern slope of the 
Sierra mountains, when it was learned 
that the snow ie sixteen feet deep on the 
track tietween that place and a station 
five miles west. The late rains, followed 
by freezing weather, had transformed 
this into ice which will have to l)e 
chopped out and shoveled away by 
hand. 



Register Tomorrow. 



Another £ift'el Tower. 

Chica(;o, Jan. 27. — A local paper says: 
"London is to have an Eiffel tower that 
will out Eiffel EiffeL It is to be 1200 
feet high, overtopping the wonder of 
Paris by over 200 feet. A company has 
been formed, stock subscribed and con- 
tracts are being let. Chicago will have 
the same interest in the enterprise as she 
did in the Eiffel tower, for the same ele- 
vator company will build elevators for 
the new tower at London. Estimates 
are now being prepare<l for that purpose. 

Only One Killed. 

Columbus, Ga., Jan. 27.— The dispatch 
from Opelika reporting a collision on the 
Columbus & Western Saturday, aa re- 
ported from Birmingham, proves to have 
been badly exaggerated. Henry Smith, 
a fireman, this city, was the only person 
killed and no one was badly injuried. 

Register Tomorrow. 



14 



400 Acres. 

All of e^ and n^' of nw>4, sec. 2r>-.51- 
E. W. Maukell, 
Hotel St. Louis, ground floor. 



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LOVE FOR THE OUEEN. 



A Resolution of Loyalty in 
Canada Makes a Bit- 
ter Fight. 



The Conservatives Loudly Ex- 
press Their Undy- 
ing Love. 



Ottawa, Ont., Jan. 27.— The report 
that the opponents of political union 
with the United States would put on the 
gloves and dare the annexationists to 
combat had the effect of drawing a large 
crowd to Parliament house today. 

The galleries allotted to the general 
public as well as to the distinguished 
visitors were crowded, and nearly every 
member was in his seat. Mr. Mulsek 
had been selected as the spokesman of the 
"loyal" element, and at the close of an 
earnest s]>eech he moved that a humble 
address be presented to the Queen. It 
was in the following strain: 

Most (Jracious Majesty: We, your 
majesty's most dutiful and loyal subjects, 
the commons of Canada in parliament 
assembled, desire most earnestly in our 
own name and on behalf of the people 
whom we have the honor to represent 
to renew the expression of our un- 
swerving loyalty and devotion to your 
majesty's person and government. May 
it please your majesty, we have learned 
with feelings of the most 
sincere and earnest disapproval 
that various public statements have 
been made, calling in question the loyalty 
of the people of Canada to the political 
union now happily existing between this 
Dominion and the British empire, and 
representing it as the desire of the peo- 
ple of Canada to sever such connection. 
We would therefore assure your majesty 
that such statements are wholly incor- 
rect representations of the sentiments 
and aspirations of the people of Canada; 
who are among your majesty's most 
loyal subjects and are devotedly attached 
to the political union existing between 
Canada and the rest of the British em- 
pire; and earnestly desire its continu- 
ance; we would therefore earnestly ex- 
press the hope that your gracious 
majesty will be pleased not to allow any 
of fcuch statements, should they have 
been communicated to your majesty to 
impair your majesty's confidence in the 
unswerving loyalty of your Canadian 
subjects to your majesty's person; 
and government, but would be pleased 
to accei)t the assurance conveyed in the 
humble address as representing correctly 
(which they do) the contentment of 
your majesty's Canadian subjects with 
the political connection between Canada 
and the rest of the British empire, and 
of their unwavering determination, at 
all hazards and sacrifices, to aid in main- 
taining the same We pray that the 
blessings of your majesty's reign may, 
for your people's sake, be long con- 
tinued." 

The debate on the address is likely to 
be prolonged and bitter. 

Register Tomorrow. 



A NEW SECT 



Whose MeuiberM Take .Scripture Doctrines 
Kather Too Literally. 

Kansas City, Mo., Jan. 27.— For some 
time rumors of the existance of a new re- 
ligious sect, which has gained a foothold 
in the territory adjacent to Blue river, 
just east of Kansas City, has been afioat, 
and they have reached the ears of the 
police. The secretary of the Humane 
society recently received a letter from a 
man living in the neighborhood telling 
him that if the authorities did not inter- 
fere the people would take the matter 
into their own hands. 

According to reports, the practices of 
the sect were founded ujKjn the biblical 
injunction to do good to the sick, but 
this injunction had been carried to such 
an extent that the sect had degenerated 
into a band of bkx)d-suckers — those who 
were well allowing themselves to be bled 
for those who were sick. An official investi- 
gation of the matter proved that the 
letter to Secretary Hackett had not told 
half the horrible practices in vogue 
among the people, who believed in the 
most savage rites. 

About a year ago there appeared 
among the people in that neighborhood 
a man named Silas Wilcox, who 
went about the country preaching 
the doctrine of doing good for the sick. 
It was not long until he had a sufficient 
number of converts to warrant him 
founding a sect, which he called the 
"Samaritans." Gradually he widened 
his teachings to his little band until he 
openly advocated the drinkin g of blood 
for all diseases, giving as his authority 
for such action, the fact that the Bible 
taught that blood was the life. 

At the home of John Wrinkle were 
found two emaciated children. On the 
bed lay Wrinkle, who was apparently in 
the last stages of consumption. When 
questioned about drinking the blood of 
his children he strenuously denied hav- 
ing done so. The children also denied 
it, but their bloodless apitearance excited 
suspicion. Their arms were in a terrible 
condition, being covered with soars 
around the inside of the elbow joint, 
showing plainly the effects of bleeding. 
When confronted with this evidence 
Wrinkle acknowledged the fact and as- 
serted that the children had willingly 
given their blood to restore him to 
health. The children were placed in a 
cbildrens home. 



Register Tomorrow. 



THE BAND'S FAIR. 

Program of the Fair to be Given for the 
French Band. 

The fair in aid of the French band 
will open in Ingalls hall on Thursday 
evening, Jan. 30, and will close on Mon- 
day, Feb. 3. 

The band will give a concert on the 
first evening, St. Jean Baptiste society 
assisting in full regalia. 

On the second evening a vocal con- 
cert will be given by prominent ama- 
teurs including cornet selections by the 
professor of the band. 

Concert Saturday evening by the 
West Superior string band, after which 
all the prii-es will be drawn. A contest 
for a beautiful gold watch will take 
place between Miss Albina Poissant and 
Miss Ro8al>ell J. Huard. Feb. .3, will 
wind up the fair by a grand ball. Re- 
freshment tables will be kept in first- 
class style all during the fair. 

Ladies' committee: Mrs. Joseph La- 
fortune, president; Mrs. Jos. Grudel, 
vice president; Mrs. J. Conlombe; Miss 
M. Prefontaine, secretary. 

Gent's committee: P. Langlois, Jos, 
Lafortune, G. W. Paul. 

If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root &. Co.'b ad. 



ON T O THE LINE. 

CheerinK Contlrmation of Statements Re- 
garding the Duluth & Winnipeg. 

The Duluth & Winnipeg railway will 
be extended to the Canadian border as 
fast as men and tools can do the work. 
Mr. R. S. Munger returned from the 
East this noon, and brings with him 
some cheering news about the road. The 
company has absorbed much new cap- 
ital, and is now on such a financial ba- 
sis, that no opposition could hinder the 
road from being built and operated. 

The cx)mpany's plans for the new work 
are all made, and just as soon as the sea- 
son permits, grading on the extension 
will begin, with the result that the Du- 
luth & Winnipeg will be completed to 
the boundary before 1891. Surveyors 
are now at work running a line foi the 
extension. 

At a recent meeting the company de- 
cided to give orders at once for locomo- 
tives, passenger and freight equipment 
and all other stock needed. These con- 
tracts are not yet let, but will be at once. 
It is ])robable that the Minnesota Iron 
Car company will be given the oppor- 
tunity to manufacture the freight cars. 
Other important developments in con- 
nection with the road will transpire 
soon 

VOTE TO INCORPORATE. 



TO INCREASE TRAVEL 



A Local Connpany Will Push the 

Duluth Tourist 

Business. 



Duluth FiKhermen Will lucorpoiate Under 
the law ; Kick on Pr^es. 

The Duluth fishermen have been in 
consultation today perfecting arrange- 
ments looking toward incorporating as 
an organization. They are already se- 
curing bids for fish for the season of 1890, 
and shipments of lake trout are being 
asked for, but the leaders amongst them 
realize from past exijerience that they 
cannot make any contracts until they 
are incorporated under the state law. 

About sixty of them met on Saturday 
afternoon, and for three hours discussed 
this plan thoroughly, and finally voted 
to incorporate. An agreement was signed 
by forty men owning boats, nets and 
regularly engaged in fishing, not to set 
another net or put any more time in re- 
fitting unless they could get better 
prices than were paid last seastm. 

At this morning's meeting it was voted 
to incorporate under the name of the 
Lake Superior Fish company and the 
following officers were elected: Theo- 
dore Thompson, president; William Os- 
born, vice-president; W. D. Tomlin, sec- 
retary; T. T. Trevillion, treasurer; Theo- 
dore Thompson, William Osborn, Charles 
Stepness, John Peterson, H. Mattison, 
William Smith, R. L. Francis, Thomas 
F. Trevillion, A. Christreson, P. Larson, 
W. D. Tomlin, were made a board of di- 
rectors. The directors will meet Thurs- 
day, Jan. .30, when they will proceed to 
incorporate. 

MASTER OF THE SNOW. 



Another Trial of the Priest Flanger in 
Practical Service. 

Another exhibition trial of the Priest 
fianger and plough was made on the line 
of the Eastern Minnesota on Saturday 
afternoon in the presence of a party of 
interested observers, among whom were 
the chief engineer and master mechanic 
of the Duluth &, Iron Range road, the 
manager of the National Iron works, and 
several business men of this city. The 
trial like the former one reported in The 
Herald a week or two ago, was a practi- 
cal application of the fianger in the 
regular course of track clearing on the 
lines of the Eastern road, and was a com- 
plete success in the opinion of all pres- 
ent. The expert railroad men were the 
most unhesitating and pronounced in 
their endorsement, and the in%'enfor, 
the present master mechanic of the 
Eastern, has reason to be heartily proud 
of the result of the exhibition and its 
indisputable evidence of tiie superior 
practical value of his perfected design. 
It is surely the coining snow clearer of 
all well equipped roads. 

Comtuunlcatlon. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

Permit me to say through-your paper 
that the charge published in The Daily 
News, and by it reiterated, to the effect 
that I am seeking the position of city 
attorney, and that there is a combina- 
ion between the republican nominee, 
Mr. M. O. Hall, and myself, through 
which that result is to be brought about 
in the event of Mr. Hall's election is 
simply false. I do not desire, nor do I 
need the city attorneyship, or any other 
ofiice; and I wish to say that I have 
never aspiretl to any office, here or else- 
where. Our present able and efficient 
city attorney, S. L. Smith, a sound and 
consistent, republican, has given, as I 
believe, entire satisfaction and shouid 
be retained in that position. 

It is needless for me to assure those 
with whom I am acquainted that my 
action in the recent republican conven- 
tion was grounded by what I conceived 
to be for the best interests of the party. 
Yours truly, 

J. B. Cotton. 



Don't Want a Compromise. 

Young McNabb of St. Paul, who was 
arrested here by Chief Doran during the 
early part of the week, was a forger and 
secrured t650 from the Capital Bank of 
St. Paul. His father has offered to 
mortgage his home and sell some of his 
furniture to raise money for a settle- 
ment if the bank will not prosecute and 
no warrant has yet been issued. States 
Attorney Egan grew quite wrathy when 
the prisoner was brought before the 
judge, and turning to President Kirk of 
the bank said, "If this is going to be a 
shake down I will not be a party to it." 
He refused to have anything to do with 
the prosecution. 

The Building & I.oau Hearing. 

Ed. Ingalls received a '•ommunication 
from Public Examiner »enyon, Satur- 
day afternoon, informing him that the 
examination into the affairs of the Amer- 
ican Building & Loan association of Min- 
neapolis has been again postponed until 
the 31st inst. On this date the Duluth 
committee will go down, attend the 
meeting and contribute its qnota of evi- 
dence. 



The Town's New Name. 

Courtenay A. Buell of Itasca, is in the 
city. Mr. Buell is heavily interested in 
real estate at Akeley, and reiiorts con- 
siderable inquiry for business lots in 
that thriving town. Considerable build- 
ing is going on the village. Two new 
names are suggested for the village, 
Prairie River and Winterport, one of 
which will probably be suggested, and 
no doubt permanently retained. 



Notice. 

Owing to the unoomfortableness of 
the building formerly occupied by the 
African Methodist Episcopal denomina- 
tion, they have moved to Ingalls Hall, 
Superior street, where they would be 
pleased to see all. The musical part of 
the service has been greatly improved 
by the addition of Professor 
Z. A. Coleman, of St. Paul, a gifted 
gentleman of therace, who is 
known for his musical abil- 
ity. As a vocalist he ranks second to 
none in the city, therefore if you desire 
a rare musical treat come out and bear 
him. Services Sunday evening at 8:15. 



An 



ilegant Passenger Steamer 
to be Brought to 
This Port. 



The Company may Also 
cide to Put up a Sum- 
mer HoteL 



De- 



Tho Duluth Steamboat and Land 
Improvement company is now being or 
ganizid. A number of heavj' l(x;al capi- 
talist*! are interested in the scheme, and 
it is said that moneyed men from the 
East ire also in the company. The ob- 
ject ill to run an excursion steamship 
line f 'om Lake Sujoerior ports to this 
city, 1 ind also to compete for a share of 
the kcal excursion business. 

Bee ides these intentions the company 
will deal in lands, mainly in those suit- 
able far summer resort purposes. It is 
not improbable, that the steamboat com- 
pany may build a resort of its own at 
the htiad of the lakes, and make it the 
lake terminus for the line, a hotel being 

erected for the accommodation of excur- 
sionis -£. 

It IS proposed to begin operations 
this season, negotiations for one 
steamer having already begun. 
This boat will be the most 
elegai it excursion steamer ever seen at 
the hoad of the lakes. It will accommo- 
date £ large crowd in comfort. The boat 
will b} able to develop great speed. It 
will b) fitted with lower cabins and an 
upper saloon, with staterooms for use 
on lorg tripe. All these will be elegantly 
furniehed. The main and promenade 
decks will be strong, and unusually 
spacic us, so as to insure plenty of room 
when dancing is indulged in. 

The excursion department of the com- 
pany vill be under the management of a 
gentleman of long experience in marine 
businoss, who will treat Duluthians to 
some modern ideas heretofore unexpe- 
rienced in the excursion business of 
Lake i^uperior. 

The Duluth Steamboat & Land Im- 
provement company shows wisdom in 
begin) ling business this coming season. 
So far as can now be predicted, Duluth 
will s(e an influx of summer visitors to 
the h« ad of the lakes greater l)y 100 per 
cent taan has ever before visited this 
city. Through the large circulation of 
riie iVeekly Herald in Eastern cities, 
and the many particulars of the pictur- 
esque beauties and the pure air of Du- 
luth's territory along the north 
and iouth shores and the Vermilion 
range publish in extract and from cor- 
respondence in Eastern journals, as well 
as other publications from this city, Du- 
luth h as become extensively advertised, 
and the results will be seen in the 
jrowd 3 of tourists who will fill Duluth 
bounc boats and railway lines 
durini; the warm months. The 
Vermilion range. Isle Royale, Spirit 
lake, 1 he Brule, Beaver bay. Grand Ma- 
rais, tie Apostle islands, the St. Louis 
dalles and, above all, Duluth herself, are 
a few of the wonders at the head of the 
lakes which are becoming almost as well 
knowi I to Eastern people as Saratoga, 
Bar H arbor or the resorts of the Ad- 
irondfcs. All the hotels are making 
prepa; ations to entertain large crowds 
and The Spalding may need the annex 
which will probably be built for it this 
year. The Duluth Steamboat & Land 
Imprcvement company begins ite ex- 
istence under auspicious circumstances. 



A TRAIN TAKES jFIRE. 



Burned 



On the Monon Route ^ieven are 
to Death. 

Indlanapolis, Ind., Jan. '27.— Passen- 
ger train No. 1 on the Monon route, 
which left Chicago Sunday night, was 
wrecked this morning one mile above 
Carmel, sixteen miles north of this city. 
The train was running at a rapid rate 
and was approaching a long trestle when 
the tender jumped the track. The en- 
gineer reversed his engine, but before 
the air brakes could check the speed of 
the train locomotive and baggage car 
had cleared the trestle, but both sleeper 
and smoking coach went into the creek, 
both teking fire almost immediately and 
being consumed in a remarkably short 
time. 

Those who escaped uninjured busied 
themselves in digging the dead and in- 
jured from the wreck, but before this 
could be accomplished 
burning cars became 
they had to withdraw, 
the following are killed and injured: 

Killed: J.N. Deming, Sheridan, Ind., 
crushed; Mrs. Eubanks, Broadripple, 
"rrushed; unknown woman, burned; un- 
known woman crushed; two children of 
D. S. Oldham, Sheridan, crushed. 

Injured: J. D. Parson, Sheridan, Ind., 
will die; H. C. Miller of New Vork city, 
will die; Louis Newman, internal injur- 
ies; Geo. Munser, badly hurt; Chas. G. 
Wirt, Frankfort, bruised; B. S. Whitsett, 
Indianapolis, head and back; N. B. In- 
gersoll, Detroit; J. P. Altzier, serious; G. 
W. Stingel, Crossville, back injured; 
Harry Angle, elbow cut off. 

Officials of the road say that the train 
was going quite slowly when it struck 
the broken rail. The engine got clear 
over, the cars immediately next tipping 
over on an incline and taking tire, 
whether from lamps or stoves has not 
been ascertained. 

No. 2 train arriving on the scene of 
the accident shortly afterwards, the 
dead and wounded were put on board 
and taken back to Indianapolis. Nearly 
all the killed were in the sleeper, which 
was among the first of the cars to take 
tire. 



the heat of the 
so intense that 
As far as known 



THE FI RE RE CORD. 

Fully $65,000 L«S8 In Itihpeming; $100,- 
OOO in a Navy Yard. 

IsHPEMiNG, [Special.] -Jan. 27.— The 
"iron store'" owned by A. W. Myers &, 
Co. was discovered in flames at 1 o'clock 
this morning. The building was burned 
to the ground and not a single article 
was saved. It is supposed the books 
are secure in the big safe. Loss on 
building, 815,000; insurance, 845a); loss 
on stock, $40,000; insurance, 81'2,500. Ad- 
joining buildings were saved with great 
difficulty. 

PoKi^^MOUTH, N. H., Jan. 27.— The 
largest fire that ever occurred at Kitter 
navy yard broke out this morning in the 
boiler room of building No. 45, occupied 
by the construction and repair depart- 
ments as a machine and iron plate shop. 
The fire quickly extended along the 
shafting and oily timbers into building 
No. 44, occupied" by a futtook mill. Men 
were obliged to jump through the win- 
dows to escape. Despite the effort of 
firemen and marine guard, the fire ex- 
tended into the machine shop, and help 
was called for from this city. With re- 
inforcemente from the city the fire was 
confined to two buildings. The loss is 
expected to reach 8100,000. 



A Healthy City. 

The death rate so far this month has 
been less than one per day. Only twenty- 
four deaths have been returned to date. 
Of these twelve were infante. Not a bad 
showing for a city of 50,000 inhabitante. 
There have been twenty-nine births, but 
several are known not to have been yet 
returned. 



Any kind or description of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job rooms. 



-I- CHEAP - ACRES -i- 



NEXT TO LAND THAT WILL BE 



F^latted This Spring. 



WILLIAM C. SARGENT 



REAL ESTATE. 

Special Bargains I Snaps. 

[C'O Acres in 4-50-1 4, 25 percent below the 
mai'ket. 
200 Acres in 47- 1 6 at $5 per acre. 

Lands in 28-50- 1 5 at a great bargain. 
Several pieces of acreage on the hill below 
the market. v 

2 Lots on Superior Street, Endion. 

IS3 Lots adjoining Lonaon, cheap. 

t\ few of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale tix\ easy terms. 

i\ few desirable lots in Endion for sale without cash pay- 
men t, if improved. 

J. M. ROOT & CO., 

Room 9, Metropolitan Block. v 



"IT 



" 



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JANTJABY 27, 1890. 



f 






ELIOT LORD, Publisher. 




PRICE, THREE CENTS— Subscription Rates: 

Dailjr, by mall, per year •7.00 

Dally, by mail, per three months 2.00 

Dally, by mall, per one month T6 

IN THB CITV. 

D**lyi by carrier, per week 18 



and conscientious conviction with due de- 
liberation of all the facis in the case and 
regard for party above persons though 
not above principle. Whatever such 
conclusion may be The Herald calls 
for it. 



Entered at the poetolfice at Duluth. Minn., aa 
8econd<-la88 mall matter. 



^TThe Washington office of The Herald is 
at 14^4 New York avoaue, N. W., when.- the 
paper is kept on Uie and where The HuraUl 
oorrespoudeut will welcome visitors from the 
Northwest. 



THE HERALD'S POSITION. 

The ground taken by The Herald in 
the weeks immediately preceding the 
holding of the republican city conven- 
tion has been evident, we believe, to all 
readers. But t»-> avoid the possibility of 
any misunderstanding, we now state it 
succinctly. Its news columns have been 
open to any proper suggestion or recom- 
mendation of any candidate for the con- 
sideration of the people, but it has re- 
frained from any eilitonal expression of 
preferences. This course it followed for 
the sake of entire fairness and 
party harmony, and for the 
reason also that it considered that citi 
zens of longer residence and wider per- 
sonal acquaintance were better qualitied 
than The Herald editor tc judge of the 
availability of the candidates presented. 
It was the earnest hope of The Her- 
ald that the party convention when as- 
sembled would view the situation care- 
fully and dispassionately and unite 
finally upon the candidate preferred for 
the most substantial reasons and singled 
out by an unclouded expression of the 
views of the primaries. Unfortunately. 
this was not the case. In the 
opinioo of the declared sup- 
porters of Mr. Pearson, at least, 
Mr. Hall was not in the field by his own 
statement and the presentation of his 
name to the convention was an un- 
doubted surprise to them. It is averred 
that in some wards delegates were voted 
for on the understanding or general as- 
surance that they were in favor of Mr. 
Pearson for mayor, and that their ac- 
tion in the convention in casting their 
votes for Mr. Hall was a mis-represen- 
tation of the views of some of the voters 
at least. On the other hand it is stated 
by the supporters of Mr. Hall that his 
position before the O-mvention was an 
entirely legitimate one. He had de- 
clined to offer himself as a candidate, 
and had left the question entirely in the 
hands of his political friends as to 
whether his name should be presented 
or not. It was his friends then from 
their standpoint and his who took the 
responsibility of working in his interest 
and securing delegates and the presen- 
tation of his name to the convention. 

It is obvious that this misunderstand- 
ing and confiict of views are much to be 
regretted by all true friends of the re- 
publican party, who hold the honorable 
interests of the party above all personal 
considerations. The Herald has consist- 
ently deprecated the drawing of party 
lines in city elections while fully recog- 
nizing that it was a practical conoition 
and not a theory that faced the city at 
this time. Both parties had determined 
to call party conventions and 
it remained only to hold them 
and conduct them in a manner 
that would give no just ground of dis- 
satisfaction to any loyal citizen. Both 
as a matter of politicfd expediency and 
public i)olicy. The Herald is emphati- 
cally in favor of avowed candidacies. It 
is too often too hard to draw the Ime 
fairly between proper modesty and 
mock-modesty in withholding the use of 
a candidate's name to make the practice 
acceptable to straight-forward men, and 
the liveliest and most successful polit- 
ical htistlers whom The Herald knows 
have uniformly preferred to submit 
their cause to the judgment of the peo- 
ple by frank assertion. In the present 
case the decision was different, and as 
we think a grave mistake. For in leav- 
ing the matter wholly to the discretion 
of friends, the successful candidate 
has exposed himself to very 
sharp and warm fault finding 
and the party is constrained to face 
patent dissatisfaction and open and 
secret secessiona 

What course shall be adopted under 
the circumstances is a question which 
every loyal republican must finally de- 
cide for himself upon a thorough and 
temperate survey of the situation. It is 
again a condition and not a theorj- that 
confronts us, and it is the judicial tem- 
per in which alone it should be reviewed. 
It is unquestionably right to consider all 
material reasons that can l>e urged for 
the support of the republican conven- 
tion candidate, as well as those that are 
brought, or may !.« brought, against him. 
The testimony of Mr. H. S. Lord, a mem- 
ber of the republican city committee 
is given in The Herald today to 
the effect that no manipulation 
of the committee's action in 
his favor, and no intluence of any kind 
■ was brought to bear upon the committee 
by its chairman to promote his selection 
as the party convention candidate. This 
evidence of Mr. Lord will have the 
weight to which it is entitled as a com- 
petent witness and an accredited sup- 
porter of Mr. Pearson before the con- 
vention. Mr. Hall is a trained business 
man of known standing as cashier of 
the State bank of this city, and con- 
cededly well-equipped in point of 
ability for the discharge of the duties of 
the mayor's oCace. He has been recog- 
nized and honored by the party here by 
selection as chairman of the city republi- 
can committee, and is now the regularly- 
elected candidate of the party in conven- 
tion assembled. Opposition to him is 
opposition to the declared choice of 
the republican city convention 
or in other words is bolting the party 
nomination. The Herald, as it has re- 
peatedly announced, is not tied to the 
tail of any party, but as an honest re- 
publican newspaper, it holds firmly that 
only ver\- grave reasons can justify the 
demoralization of the party by dissen- 
■ion and secession. The final appeal of 
every true republican in a case of this 
kind must be to his sober judgment. 



The Marquette Journal presents a 
tabulated statement showing the output 
of the iron mines of Lake Sujien'or for 
the year ending December 30, 1889, in- 
cluding rail shipments. The total is 
7.'292,754 gross tons— the largest quantity 
of ore that the mines of this region ever 
placed on the market in a single year. 
The gain over 1888 is 2,237,3i3 tons. The 
work of the year was by far the greatest 
yet achieved by the mines, and is about 
double what it was anticipated the 
mines would ship at the opening of the 
season last spring. The shipments from 
the several ranges were as follows: Mar- 
quette range, :i,(J34,817 tons; Ciogebic, 
!],01l),3i)l; Menominee, 1,71)0,7(54; Ver- 
milion, 844,782. The greatest percentage 
of increase is in our own Vermillion 
range. The Herald goes on record as 
stating that tiiis range will alsoshowthe 
largest relative gain in ISIK). 

The Herald was informed yestt^rday 
by undoubted authority that the city 
was actually at work cleaning snow off 
the sidewalks, in the way it should go, 
but the practical results of the work 
today are far to seek. Keep up the 
good work and let it speak for itself to 
the satisfaction of every weary citizen. 

SEEN AND HEARD. 



I bad supposed that the Idea of a cooking 
school in couueclion with the public sch(X)ls 
was u project decidedly new and thai Duluth 
was entitled to a great deal of credit for bring- 
ing it out. 1 still l>elieve Dulutq's school 
board Is entitled to great credit tor adopting 
the plan, but Miss l-'rench assures me that 
there are no less ttihn a dozen or perhaps Uf- 
teen cities in the Union where the cooking 
school is made part ol girls' public education. 
That the idea is an exceedingly gtiod one there 
can be no duul't. i bear nothing but praise of 
the school board for adopting it. "The fact 
is.' said a traveled and cultured gentleman 
yesterday, "the fact is, you mighty seldom 
tlad a public school b<.>ard as earnest, honest 
and progressive as is that of Duluth and all of 
us who have children to be educated owe the 
l>oard a debt of gralltuile." The new high 
school Is, I hear, to contain a fully equipped 
aud well-arrange<l kitchen where the high 
school girls can carry out the culinary part of 
their day's studies The manual training de- 
piirlment is also to be beiter housed ami cared 
tor than is at present possible aud Is to be 
made still more of a feature. 
* * If 
"1 don't believe in divorce at all," said 
Judge :}tearns In a social chat the other day. 
"When people are married it should be a life- 
long contract, terminated only by the death of 
one of the parties. Separations may become 
necessary, but not divorce. Voung people get 
married uow-a-days too much for fun; that Is. 
they regard the ceremony as a plajthing when 
they should l)e taught to think of it as the 
highest and hoUest of earthly alliances. I 
think there should be a slight change in the 
law , for some people agn« to marry and then 
for some reason do not wish to do so, but 
through fear of breach of promise suits 
go on with a ceremony which 
binds them up In chains Uiat are 
galling and oppressive. Then, in a short time, 
cximes the struggle for a release with all Its 
direful train of charges and counter charges. 
The marriage ceremony should always be a 
public one aud the contracting parties should 
be asked Individually, just before the cere- 
mony, no matter whether the ceremony be per- 
formed by civil or religious authorities, 
whether they desired to draw back and not go 
on with the marriage. They should be given 
to understand that the contract is for Ufe, but 
tliat the law would protect either of them 
from breach of promise actions. Then go 
ahead with the marriage and make it 'until 
death us do part.' " 



Rev. C. C. Salter: The funeral of 
young Glenn Roebuck, one of our Hethel 
boys, 14 years old, held Saturday after 
noon, impressed the boys very much in- 
deed. They marched in procession to 
the cemetery, and there were manv 
others in the funeral train. His deat^ 
was very sad. 

Superintendent of Schools Denfeld: 
The influenza has lowered the school 
attendance to a considerable extent, 
but we have been more fortunate than 
eastern cities. The sickness among 
teachers in January and February is 
also more general than in any other 
montlis of the year. I believe the 
disease is abating considerably. It 
would appear to be from our recorda 

C. W. Wells, F^iist Saginaw: T came up 
here to attend meetings of the Wells- 
Stone and Chapin-WoUs companies and 
the Duluth & Winnipeg road, and I like 
Duluth better every time I see it. I 
don't stay very long at a time. The fact 
is I darens't. I know that if I should 
stay in Duluth thirty days I'd be a hope- 
less case. I w^uld make this my home 
at oiue. 

H. S. Lord, of city Republican com- 
mittee: I did not say to The Tribune 
reporter "but I am disappointed." I did 
say to the reporter in reference to Mr. 
Hall's nomiuation, that "I was surprised, 
I am a republican and shall vote the re- 
publican ticket." I did compare notes 
and expressions of other people concern- 
ing Mr. Hall, and before the reporter 
left my office he exi)re8sly agreed not to 
misquote me. I called his attention to 
the fact that as member of the commit- 
tee I was trying to do my part of the 
committee's duty. So far as I know, I 
have attended every meeting of the city 
committee relating to this campaign, 
and Mr. Hall has never at those meet- 
ings said a word abt^ut being a candidate 
for mayor. Neither has he directly or 
indirectly solicited any support from 
me, or any other member of the com 
mittee so far as I can learn. There has 
been no manipulation of the committee 
in the interests of anyone and anyone 
making such a charge is entitled to the 
name of a demagogue. 

Postmaster John Flynn: lam not a 
candidate for the mayoralty, and will 
not run. 

Manager Emerson, of The Spalding: 
The Duluth Steamboat and Land Im- 
provement company will undoubtedly 
have great success in its imdertaking. 
It is something Duluth has long needed 
and it will result in establishing Duluth 
as the local point for excursions from all 
over the country. 



It is reported that the Khan of Khiva 
and the Fimin of Bokhara are to make 
the tour of Europe. Europe can stand 
it if thev khan. 

Two ftuBsian climbers of Mt. Ararat 
found in perfect preservation a mini- 
mum thermometer, which was left there 
last year. It registered .'JO below zero 
Alexander T. Stewart left an estate 
estimated all the way from ;820,000,(XX) to 
iJ4(),(»(;j,(X)0. At the end of a dozen years 
his widow, to whom he left nearly all of 
it, was in debt to the executor in the 
sum of iSKXVXX), and the estate has 
shrunk to .^r_>,O0O,(X)O. Jim H-^isk left to 
his widow !?:5,r)(X),000. The estate was 
eaten up by sharks of various kinds, and 
Mrs. Fisk, who is now a miserablv p(X)r 
woman, is living on a small farm 'in New 
England. 

Clara Barton, the well known philan- 
throj)ist, is agoo<l shot with either a 
rifle or shotgun. She has been seen to 
bring down two praine chickens from 
the first Hush of the covey. 

Uen. William Tecum.seh Sherman 
8j)end8 much of his time turning the 
leaves of his scraj) b<x)ks of m ips. Many 
of them were pencil sketches which 
wore made by oflicers under his com 
mand in battle days, and all are marked 
with crosses and lined with red ink and 
have marginal comments. 

Edmuntl CJosse has begun a movement 
to have a memorial tablet placed on the 
London house. No. ID Warwick street, 
where Browning wrote "The Ring and 
the Book" and many other volumes. 

The funeral of Adam Forepaugh, the 
great showman, took place today. There 
was a large attendance of amusement 
managers aud personal friends froipi the 
East and West. 



CURED 



SCROFULA 



Is that Jmpurlty of the blood which jir^duces 
unsightly lumps or swellings In tlie neck; 
which causes running sores on the arms. 
legs, or Icet; which develops ulcers In the 
eyes, ears, or nose, often causing blindness or 
deafness; which is the origin of pimples, can- 
cerous growths, or "humors;" which, fasten- 
ing upon the lungs, causes consumption and 
death. It Is the most ancient of all diseases, 
and very few i>erson8 are entirely free from It 

How Can 
It Be 

By taking Hood's Sarsaparilla, which, by 
the remarkable cures It h;i3 acconii)lished, 
has proven Itself to be a potent and peculiar 
medicine for this disease. If you suffer from 
scrofula, try IltHid's Sarsaparilla. 

" Every spring my wife and children have 
been troubled with scrofula, my little boy, 
three years old, being a terrible sufferer! 
Last spring lie was one ni.ass of sores from 
hod to feet. We all took Hood's Sarsap.-u-llla, 
and all liavo been cured of the scrofula. My 
little boy Is entirely free from sores, and all 
four of my chUdren look bright and healthy." 
W. B. Athekton, Passaic City, N. J. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

SoIdbyalUlruKgists. SV.sixtnrS.',. I're pared only 
by V. I. HOOD & C(J., Apothecaries, I.owell, Mass. 

lOO Doses One Dollar 



BHYM[ OF THE GOOSt 



An Old Lady, a Stranger and a 

Goose Constitute the 

Subject of a 



Little Story, Which, if you Have 

the Leisure, You Might 

Read. 






Whether True or False We Cannot Say; At any 

Rate, Some Usef.t Lessons May be 

Gathered Therefrom. 



J. D. & R. C. RAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 



ROOM "B," 



TEMPLE OPERA NOTES. 



Register Tomorrow. 



AMONG STATE EDITORS. 

Wadena County Pioneer: The Weyer- 
hauser Lumber company has purchased 
all pine owned by the Northern Pacific 
company tributarj- to Brainerd, and the 
same is to be manufactured there. From 
this fact it is pretty certain that Brain- 
erd is not dead — far from it. 

St. Cloud Journal Press: Of 8,648,581 
passengers transported in Minnesota 
last year the number killed was but two, 
thus going far toward venfjing the 
truth of the statement that it is safer to 
travel than to stay at home. Thirty- 
three other paasongers were injured but 
not killed. 

Northtield Xewe: It doesn't make the 
slightest difference to The News how 
much the Minnesota senators love or 
hate each other; but a few men old 
enough and endowed witj;! a fair amount 
of g<jod sense are trj-ing to make them- 
selves believe how much our senators are 
in love, which the same— well, who cares, 
anyway'/ 

The Weather Bulletin. 

Meteorolog^ical report received at Duluth 
Minn , 8 a. m. Jan 37, 1890. 



"Zig Zag" opens a two night engage- 
ment here this evening. Of this piece 
The St. Paul Dispatch says: "There 
were only a few vacant seats in the en- 
tire lower tloor of the Newmarket thea- 
ter last evening when the curtain was 
rung up for the first act in "Zig Zag," 
and the gallerj- was well tilled. With 
verj- little semblance of a plot an oppor- 
tunity is given to present a combination 
of some of the best features that has 
been seen in St. Paul since the "City 
Directory" company was at the New- 
market. Miss Anna Boyd, as the incor- 
rigible child, has a plesising voice, is ex- 
ceptionally funny, and an exceed- 
ingly graceful and artistic dancer. 
Alfred C. Wheelan as Mr. Hopper is an 
exceptionally worthy comedian, and if 
he would put a slight curb on his deep 
bass voice while constituting the heavy 
end of the company's musical quartet, 
he would elicit nothing but praise 
throughout the entire piece. George 
Bruno made his first apiwarance as Jaggs 
Green. His story of Peter at the gate 
was one of the most amusing features of 
the evening." 

Clara Morris will make a three months' 
tour next season through the Northwest, 
in a territory entirely new to her. 

It is rumored that J. B. Bo<jth, eldest 
son of the late Junius Brutus Booth, will 
shortly wet! a member of the Boston 
Museum company. He is also a member 
of the Museum company. 

Register Tomorrow. 



IN WINTER. 



PLACES. Bar .Ther.iWind Kaln 



Duluth 

Pt. Arthur. 
Wlnnipejr 
St. Vincent 

2'AppeUe 
sslnib'ne . 

Helena 

Huron, Dak 
6t. Paul.... 
La Crosse. . . 
Bismarck. . . 
Moorhead . 



■JO. 421 16 
:tO.;C 10 
:it».fi<ii— 13 
:«j.<iiji— 18 



:to.i; 

■i».'3l> 
■W.4> 



13 

IM 
112 
30 
31) 
-03 



SW 
NW 
Calm 
NW 
SW 
N 
SW 

w 

NW 
NW 

E 

Calm 



.03 



Weather 



Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Cloudless 

Cloudlese 



T In 



!„,». , "^Jn '■^'•"pn Indicates trace. One (1) 
inch of rain or melted snow eouals ten (10) in- 
ches of snowfall. Minus (-) In temperature 
column indicates l>elow zero. H^miure 

W. H. Fallon, 

Serge ant Sljmal Corps 

DcLCTH, Jan. 'li.— Local forecast for 
twenty-four hourn, ending 10 a. m. Jan. 
Colder, fair weatlier. 



[Louise Chandler Moulton.] 
O, to go back to the days of June. 

Just to l)e young and alive airain, 
Harken atfain to the made swit>t tune 

Birds were siiyrinff with niinrht aud main: 
South they dew at tlie summer's wane, 

LeaviujT tlieir nests for storms to harry. 
Since time was coming for wind and rain 

Under the winter skies to marry. 

Wearily wander by dale aud dune 

l-ootsteps fetteretl by clankingr chains. 
Free they were in the days of June; 

Free they never can be again. 
Fetters of age and fetters of pain. 

Joys tliat tly and sorrows that tarry; 
Youth is over and hijpe were vain 

ruder the wintry skies to marry. 

Now we chant but a desolate rune— 
"Oh, to be live aud young ajrain!" 

But never Oecember turns to June. 

.rf "? length of living is length of pain. 

>V inds In the nestless trees complain. 
Snows of winter about us tarry; 

And never the birds complain again. 
Under the wlntrv skies to marry. 

ENVOI. 

Youth and maidens, blithesome and vain 
Time make thrusts that you cannot parry 

IMate In season, for who is vain. 
Under the wintry skies to marry? 

He'll Grow. 

Father ^to editor)— I would like you to 
give my son a chance in your printing 
oflice. .> f "a 

Editor— What can the boy do? 

Father— Well, at first he couldn't do 
anything more than edit your paper and 
take general charge of the mechanical 
department, but later on when he learns 
sense he'll be handy to have anjund to 
wash windows, keep lamp chimneys clean 
and sift ashes. 



Attention, Property Holders t 

The undersigned are a committee ap- 
pointed by a meeting representing all 
classes of property holders in the Third 
division of Duluth. 

They were appointed to secure the co- 
operation of all pro{)ertj' holders in the 
division who desired to join in a suit t<i 
quiet the adverse claim of Frederick 
Prentic* to an undivided one-half inter- 
est in the division. 

The Prentice claim has been twice ad 
versely adjudicated by the courts, and 
is generally and justly regarded as with- 
out any foundation whatever. Never- 
theless, he persists in asserting it, and 
can make it a source of annoyance and 
embarrassment to property holders for 
many years to come, unless aggressive 
measures are taken by property holders 
to dispose of it. In the absence of ag- 
gressive measures, there is also danger 
that valuable testimony in support of 
the regular title may ' be lose by he 
death of witnesses. 

It is proposesd that all property hold- 
ers in the division who desire to take the 
necessary steps to quiet their title, shall 
join in one suit against Prentice for that 
l)urpose; and in order that every prop- 
erty holder in the division may have the 
benefit of such an action at a compara- 
tively trifling expense, public notice of 
this proposed suit is hereby given. 

All those who, in order to participate 
in the benefits of the action, are willing 
to contribute to its expense in propor- 
tion to the value of their several prop- 
erties, should call immediately at the 
olliee of Snively, Craig i Green, in the 
First National bank building (they hav- 
ing been employed to assist in the pre- 
liminary work of organization), and leave 
their names and a description of their 
Third division properties. 

Property holders are particularly cau- 
tioned that the action will benefit only 
those who become parties to it. 
Dated Jan. 23, 1889. 

M. R. Baldwin, 
G. G. HartLiEy, 

L. M. WiLCUTS, 

Committee. 

The Herald bindery has the best 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 

Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 
the market W. A. Footk A Co. 



HUNTER BLOCK, 



B. C. ORIDLEY. J. C. MISHLRB 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 
Real Estate Brokers 

Koom 36, Exchange BuUding. 
List you r property with us at what it Is worth 



operty 
ell It. 



and we will sell u: We invlt* everybody to 
caU In and see us, and solicit correspondence 



SPECIAL LIST 



BARGAINS 



OFFEKKl) BY 



C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage on the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivided half interest in this forty 
acres can be had for $52,000 

80 Acres at West End, near Brook- 
dale Oivlslon 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior |60 

1 Acres in the heart of the East End, 
on both sidas of Fourth street 30,000 



The best bargain offered now is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which is safe and 
sure. An investment of a small sum will carrv 
as large a rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Ouluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount still for sale. 



E. RICHARDSON, 

326 West Superior Street. 



COFFIN & WARNFR, 

30 FAKOUSSON BL»>CK. 



40 Acres, section 30-48- 14. 
I 20 Acres, section 34-48- 1 4. 

60 Acres, section 32-4H-I3, 

40 Acres, section 18-60-14. 
1 20 Acres, section 6-49- 1 6. 

40 Acres, section 2-50- 1 6. 

40 Acres, section 32-48-14. 

40 Acres, section 26-48- 1 5. 

20 Acres, section 28-48-13. 

40 Acres, section 24-50- i 6. 
I 20 Acres, section 30-60. 1 5. 



POLLING PLACES. 

Boundaries of WardH aud I'reciorts and 

Where to Register. 

Below are given the places of registra- 
tion for the municipal election that is to 
take place on Feb. 4 next. 



All below the market. 
COFFIN & WARNER 



Urst ward-Asa Dalley's lumber office. 
^— oiKi ward McBeth's 
Sut>erlor street. 



SecoiKi ward McBeth's grocery store. East 



Register Tomorrow. 



2S: 



Wa-shington, Jan. 'I^. —Forecast for 
twenty-four hmtm, ending >^ a. m, to- 
morrow: For Minnesota: Variable 
colder in southeast, stationary tempera- 
ture in northwestern portion. Far 
South Dakota: Fair, stationary tem- 
perature in eastern, slightly warmer in 
icestern: variable winds. For North 
Dakota: Fair, warmer in western, 
stationary temperature in eastern par 
tion; easterly to southerly winds. 



Didn't M isH the Circus. 

Mrs. Dolliver (to the new girl)— 
Noreena, throw this water out of the 
window; but be sure you look out. (Ten 
seconds later)- What's the matter? 

Xoreena— I looked out. mum, and I 
saw the water go all over as fine a gentle- 
man as you'd care to meet. 

THEY DO. 



Third ward, first precim t-Alt territory east of 
l.aie avenue to Third avenue east. Poll- 
ing place. Xo. 128 East First street. 
SecotKl priiiiict- All territory between Third 
avenue east and SL\th avenue east Poll- 
luu place, Sii East Superior street. 
Third precInct-^AIl territory lK?tween Sixth 
avenue east and Tenth avenue east. Poli- 
'"*■. .'.','"'?■• wner of Superior street 
and W a.-<hin(fton avenue. 
Fourth ward, first precinct— All ter-ltory be 
tween Lalte avenue and Third avenue west 
north of .the First ward limits. Polling 
place, Howard buildln<f, 113 West First 
street. 
Second precinct— All territory between 
1 bird avenue west and Sixth avenue west. 
PollinK pluce,41» West SuiK.-rior street. 
Third prednct-AIl territory between Si.xth 
ayenue west and Twelfth avenue west. 
I'oilinjr place, 101 West Superior street. 
*^"'i,,^"''''' ""^t precincl-AU that part of 
!• if til ward north of Northern Pacific rail- 
road yards and east of Garfield avenue. 
PoiliuK place. ItWi West Superior street 
Second precinct— .Vil that part of Rkres 
Pomt south of Northern Pacific railroad 
,„>'.*1*'8- PolliUK Pliioo, 63« Garfield avenue. 
Third precinct- All tliat part of the ward 
west of Garfield aud Pie<Iuiont avenues 
and north of the Northern Pacific milroad 
yards. PoUlDgr place, l'J£i West MIchijfan 

Sixth wiinl-Polling place. No. 2231 West 
Michijran street. 




AT ONCE! 



S2,500 Mortgage. 
S 1 ,000 Mortgage. 
S800 Mortgage. 
$600 Mortgage. 
$200 Mortgage. 
Loans of other sizes negotiated 
twenty-four hours' notice. 

N. J. UPHAM, 

Under First Nat. Bank, 

FIRE INSURANCE. 



on 




REAL ESTATE. 



6 PER CENT! 



There was a sitrn upon the fence 

The sign was "Paint," 
And everybody that went by. 

Sinner or saint. 
Put out a finger and touched the fence 

And onward sped; 
And as they wiped their finger-tips. 
It is, they said. 



Nature in Coovulsion 

Is terrific. Volcanic eruptions, cyclones, 
earthquakes are awfully and tremend- 
ously picturesque, but scarcely desirable 
to emulate in action and effect by the 
administration of remedies which pro- 
duce con /ulsion and agony in the ab- 
normal portion of the human frame 
Sucn 18 the effect of the old fashioned 
violent purgatives happily falling more 
and more into disuse, and of which Hos- 
tetter's Stomach Bitters is the whole- 
some, pleasant and far more effective 
succedaneum. They weakened the in- 
testines- the Bitters invigorates them 
rhey left the bowels inactive, because 
incapacitated by ensuing feebleness. 
Ihe Bitters, on the cfjutrary, and be- 
cause it enables, not forces, them to act 
—a vast and fortunate differem.-e— per- 
petuates their activity and regularity 
The liver is beneficially stimulated, as 
the kidneys ai.so are, by this medicine, 
which easily conquers, al-so, malaria, ner- 
vousness and rheumatism. 



The Bttbv Ih KIiik, Anyway. 

It is not right to make a king of a 
baby anyway. It has been done in Spain 
of course, but it must be expected that 
such a king would be more or less in- 
fluon«3ed by the royal nurse, jujt as 
presidente of the United States are in- 
nuenced by private secretaries. 

If She's Pretty Uentelf. 

A young man shoul.l not feel flattered 
because a pretty girl keeps his photo- 
«raph stuck in the frame of her mirror 
When she is in front of the mirror sho is 
pretty sure to be looking at Bomethimr 
else. ** 



We have at command unlimited 
amountsof money to lend promptly 
at 6 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 




LU 

< 

I- 

co 

LU 

< 

LU 

DC 



o 

UJ 

O 

-i 

o 

CO 



u 

Z 
u 
a 

z 
o 

Q. 
CO 
bJ 
OC 
QC 
O 

o 



m 



Loans Made on Onimpfoved Properfj. 



A .Sensible C'ltlendar. 

As usual at this tiiuK of the year the 
new crop of calendars is coming in, they 
are of all sorts, sizes, shapes and kinds 
and many of them can be had for the 
asking, but the Wet calentlar that comew 
t<) our office is that published by N. W. 
Ayer A Son, newspaper advertising 
agents, Philadelpliin. this (ialendar is 
14.X-- inches, the iip|,er portion hoing 
Ijeautifully printed in colors, while the 
monthly sheets are printed with figures 
so plain that they can be seen at a ilis 
tance. 



BUILOINQ LOANS A SPECIALTY. 
1^ MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTGAGES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



CUGUE & PRIIIDLE. 



Strictlj First-Class in all Appointments. 



DULUTH. 



MINN. 



ROOMS 302 AND 303 
OulufK National Bank Buildin 



K- 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 

ANr>— 

INSURANCE. 

2, exchange nidg. 



A. FITGER & GO'S 

Lake Saperior Brewery 

la the larifestln the State 3f MIo lesota ou aide 
of the Twii Cttlei 



Roomt I 
DULUTH, 



MINN. 



Great French remedy. Dr. LeDcc's per- 
loniCAL, fiij^, from Paris, Franeo, act only on 
the Kwneratlve orKans in females and posi- 
tively cun-8 suppression of inensos (from what- 
ever causei, aud ail periodical troubles pecu- 
liar to women. A safe, reliable remedy, war- 
ranted t»j excite menstruation or money ro- 
fund»»d. Hhould not be useddurlng'preflrnancy. 
The larjre pro|M)rtIoii of the ills to which liulles 
an«Kutiject Is tiiodirtH't result of a disordered 
and irren-iilar menstruation. Hobt. Stevenson 
ACX)., (!hlca<fo. III., H. iloswarth & Co., Mil- 
wauitee. Wholesale Agta. Tlie genuine only 
supplied by Boyce ft Totman, Sole Agts., Du- 



X' 



I knew an old wife, lean and poor. 
Her rafrs scarce held toother; 

There strode a stranjrer to the door. 
And it was windy weather. 

He held a goose upon his arm. 
He utter'd rhyme and reason: 

"Here, take the goose and ktsep you warm* 
It is a stormy season.' ' 

She caught the white goose by the leg; 

A goose— 'twas no great matter; 
The goose let fall a golden egg 

With cackle and with clatter. 

She dropt the goose and caught the pelf 
And ran to tell her neighbors; 

And bless'd herself, and cur8c>d herself 
And rested from her labors." 

— Tennyson. 

Our readers may possibly 
think that the foregoing poem 
is rather far-fetched. But after 
all, when rightly considered, it 
contains some food for reflec- 
tion. There are a great many 
people who have a hard strug- 
gle in life, and often when 
everything seems darkest and 
the surroundings are the most 
discouraging, they are nearest 
port. It is an old sa}ing ihat 
"The darkest hour is just be- 
fore day." This old lady in 
the rhyme saw an opportunity 
and she didn't wait to ask how 
old the goose was; whether it 
was fat or lean; or whether, on 
the whole, she had better ac- 
cept or decline. She took it 
'^too quick," and in seizing the 
first good piece of fortune in- 
stanter, another and a greater 
one immediately followed. In 
acquiring a competence, the 
first thousand dollars is gener- 
ally the most difficult to ac- 
quire. Many times people 
work long and hard and have 
to practice rigid economy to 
get a btart, and then get into 
the right current and drift on 
to fortune with apparent ease. 
But such people never refuse 
splendid opoortunities, or turn 
their backs on small things. It 
is the easiest thing in the world 
to make money if you only get 
into the right drift. The old 
lady had faith that the goose 
was a good one, and she "caught 
on" so quick that the jioose 
}ielded up a golden egg and the 
poor woman's fortune was made. 
Now, 3'cu may smile when we 
apply the moral to somethirg 
practical. It would have been 
no more unwise for the dear old 
lady to have refu.scd to accept 
the goose till she had first ixcn 
introduced lo the stranger and 
ascertained that he was of a re- 
spectable family, than it is for 
you to stand hesitating as to 
whether you should buy lots in 
Crosley Park at the give away 
prices we are offering. In 
a year from now we will all 
see how ridiculous it was for 
Mr. Crosley to sell such fine 
property at such prices (to say 
nothing of the terms) and for 
you to stand by looking on when 
you should have known that val- 
ues must inevitably make buch 
large advances in so shoit a 
time. When spring opens up 
(and there is but one more 
month of winter) there will be 
from fifty to one hundred new 
houses built in Crosley Park 
and Lester Park adjoining. 
Within six months suburban 
trains will run each way every 
half hour from 6 a. m. till mid- 
night, and the fare will proba- 
bly be the same as street car 
fare. Then, too, within a year 
you can build a $50,000 resi 
dence down there if you wish, 
and you can have water, jewers 
and electric lights the same as 
you have in Duluth. All these 
things are now assured, and 
those who buy Crosley Park 
lots by the quantity at present 
prices will make big money. 
We propose to advance prices 
soon and we suggest that it 
would be a good idea to buy 
before that time; i e, if you 
care to make money. There is 
always a time to buy and a time 
to s(^ll, and now is the time to 
buy lots at Crosley Park, and 
any time during the next five 
3 ears you will have opportuni- 
ties of selling so as to make 
large profits. Call at the office 
and get further information. 

C. I LOIIEn 4 CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 





crtot 

KiyiuS 

Jar 



SANTA GLAUS SOAP, 
MAKES WASHING VERY EASY 



-e> 



^^e crying ^^ 

loadasl^CdJi 




5fa9d2infQiiili|x 
diiclWeJsrl?t. 



Tliree liitle 



i^iro/^'-BYN.K.rAIRBANK K CO.— CHICAG 




AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



DR. OKO. li. HAYCOCK, 



Manager 



Two Nights of Meiiiment. 

M01I)4T 4KD TDESDAY, 

JAN. 27 and 28. 

FI rst appearance here of 

W. \V. TILLOTSON'S 

Meiif Comedy Comp'y 

In the Neu York success of two seasons, 

G ZAG. 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 16 FARGUSSONJBLOCK. 



OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned, 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER,"i06 Second St. East. 



WANTS. FOR SME. ETC 



ONE CENT A AORD IN ADVANCE. 



Advertisements under this head received at 
the loUowiug- places, besides the business of- 
Uee ol The Herald: 

Kodiou Fharmacy, 127 Tenth avenue east. 

Itojce & Totuian, corner Fourth avenue 
and Superior street west. 

tl. W. Nel>K>n, No. liJUl, comer El^hteentli 
aveuue west ana bui>erior street. 

1>. Johtuiou. chief clerk PhlUlps hotel. West 
Uululh. 



Presented with the orifirlnal cast, headed by 
the charn.inKSOubrette, ANNA BOYD. 



Sale Of seats Thursday, Jan. 23. 
in prices. 



advance 



PEOPLES THEATER, 



DULUTH, 



JOHN S. BARNES. Mer. 



The Best \m\\ Show in tlie Northwest 



This we€k, comiuancing JAN. 27, 

Open every night. You should seeour 
list of Stars this week. 



Admission: Gallery, IQc; Parquet, 25c; 

Orchestra Chairs, 35c; Box 

S^ats, 50c. 



Help Wanted. 

W-*^?^'^^^!^^''"' forg:eneraI housework. 6U 
East Third street. 



C^ANVASSEKS 
, can watches; 



Wanted to sell best Ameri- 
. blif com mission to reliable 
men. Apply to C. W. Wautfer, a«ent Minne- 
sota W atch company, -•ai Fourth avenue west. 



WANTEIi— A cook lor a small family, 
quire, aaj East Second street. 



In 



"VyANXED— A boy at St. Lukes hospital. 



IW l&H t« employ a lew ladles on salary- to 
take chartre ot my business at their homes, 
ivijfhl, very fasciuatiujf aud heaithtul. >\' aires 
*lu iHjr week. Kelereuce Kiven. Good pay lor 
liari time. Address with etamp, Mrs. Marion 
>V aikcr, Louisville, Ky. 



WAMKD— A middlo-ajfed man to look 
alter hotel olhce aud wail on table at the 
Oliver house, Ely, Minn, (iood wa^res to the 
rl^ht man. Apply tu Alfred GUlon, city hall. 



WAN 1KI>— A girl for general house work; 
lauiily ol inree. CaU in forenoon, 411 
Ninth aveuue east. 

8 AI . A EY, %Ati expenses in advance, 
allowed each month. Steady em- 

piyj mcui at home or travcUujr. No soliciting. 

Uuiiea dcliveilutf and making coUectlonb. Ao 

postal curds. Address with stamp, Uafer * 

Co., Piyua, Ohio. 



Doors open « t 

at 8:30. 



7:30; performance commences 




Is tba oldest lod mniit popular iclentlfle 
m*cluuilcal paper published and has the lancast 
eiroolatlOD of a ly paper of Itg elans in the worM 
Fnlly Ulnstratel. Be«t class of Wood EncraT- 
tnss. Pubhahfd weeUr. ^nd for sp«ciin«D 
«opr. Price t3 t year. Four months' trial, tl. 
MONM ft CO., I'UBUSEEHS, 861 Broadway, N T 

ARCHITIlCfslt BUILDERO 
EdItioH iif Scientific Anerican. O 

A treat snocei «. Each Issue contains colored 
Uthoirraphlc plitesof country and cltyreslden- 
oas or public biildlnes. Numerous en^raTlngs 
and full plans i.nd specifications for the use of 
nchas contemi late buildins. Price $2.50 a year, 

XctS. aOOpy. MUXN & CO., Prmi iggmmi. 

I may be secnr- 
jed by apply- 
ing to MCNN 
h, Co., who 
hsTe had over 
40 years' e::perlence and have made oyer 
100,000 applloatlons for American and For- 
eign patent i. 8end for Handbook. CoiTM- 
poadence strict y conQdenUal. 

TRADE MARKS. 

Tb eas« your n ark Is not reetstered In the Pat- 
ent Office, appl ' to MCNN i Co., and procnr* 
liomedtate prof tctlon. Send for Uandbook. 

COPTRIGriTS for books, charts, map*, 
■to., quickly pre our«d. Address 

HUMM St CO.. Patent SellolterB. 
emsAii Ovncxi M Bkoaswat, n. T 



AirANTED— Paetry cook, also other 
f f iuqi 



luire JfhiUips hotel. 



help. 



WANTED— At the Womaus Employment 
llurcuu, :;il bu|>«>vlui ctrccv oiust., iwo 
second (tirls aud a duMiU girls lor general 
house work, bmployiueut obtained iree ot 
cosi. Mio. A. D. Ayei-B. 



Fitr «>«le. 

IT^OK SALE— A htavy working team cheap 
X: ai A. W. t;:iier'r ;Ai4 idike avenue south. 




THREE 



ACREAGE 



|."^01t SALE— My residence with 50 or 100 feet 
X; at ol5 East becuuu street. Terms to Suit 
purchaser. E. A. Gilbert, Xl Uoard ot Trade. 

HEAVV HOKSES FOH SALE— 15 head of 
heavy noibcs, rai&ed at Lake Para, ou 
LUC Aorthcru Pucihc road, lor t>aie by C . W . 
naivej . cau oc seen at Howara barn, ou the 
lake shore, Minnesota point. Kesideuce, SSi 
W c>Bi i'ourih street. 



Lost. 

LOST— Part of a gold-link cuff button In 
shape of three rings. Lost In Superior 
or Uuluth. Finder will receive reward by 
leaving the same at mi office. Uobert G . Mc-- 
Dowcii, a;:; West Suptrior street. 



l-'ur K«at. 

IjlOH KENT— Desirable room; 
! steam, etc.; urivate family, 
tieralu olhce. 



bath, gas. 
Address B., 



Wanted— To K«nt. 

WANTED— A furnished house for the win- 
ter. L. J. Taussig, No. aPhoeuir block. 



FinanciiU. 

DULLTH MOKTGAGK LOAN COMPANY 
loans money in any amount on furni- 
ture, pianos, horses and wagons without re- 
moval from owner's jxissessiou ; also on ware- 
house receipts, bank stocks, aud any property 
of value; notes discounteti; partial payments 
received and j our own time gi°antod lor pay- 
a>em ; no delay ; money on baud and furnished 
immediately alter security Is approved. Wm. 
Horkau. .Muuager, Uoom 12, Fargusson block, 
Duluth, Miuu. 

IF YOU WISH TO SELL OK UUV DULUTH 
or Superior bank stock, corporation or tn- 
I vcstmeut securities, call on or address B. Mur- 
I phiu, broker, U lianniug block, Duluth, Minn. 



Bargains 



If taken at once. 



Lane situated near 





IVilSCELLANEOUS. 

NH. WILSON, ATTOHNEY AND OOUN- 
• seller at Law. Will practice In State 
ana united States Courts. All business given 

Srompl attention, 44 Fargusson block, Duluth, 
[inn. 

T3LASTEH1NG. 

H, T. DINHAM. 

All UndB of plastering done. Jobbing 
promptly attended to. Office, room D, Hun- 
ter block. 



M 



BS. J. 8. DLNWOODIE. 



-THE- 



Teacher of Piano Forte, Voice and Sight Sing- 
ing. Chorus and Choir Conductor. 

Music rooms at J. J. Wigglns's, 16 Bast Su 
perior street, and at reeldenoe, 1:21 Tenth ave. B 



jyj-H.H. 



PARKSK K0BIN80N, 
VOCAL INSTBUCnON, 
8 MILES BLOCK. 



Sl'BBBINS, ABCHITECTB 
i>erintendentB. Office, room No. 

— , Exchange building. 



MCMILLKN 
and sut>erintendentB. 



Greatest Snaps 



PALMKK 4 HALL, ARCHITBCTS 
SuperIntendents,room 46, Bzchange build' 
lug, Duluth. Minn. E. S. Palmer, lTP. 1 



AND 

>uil< 
HaU. 



In the market. 



c. 




HO., 



ADDRESS 



BOX A A, DULUTH, MINN. 



REAL ESTATE. 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE OBNUim BABOAIKS IH 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

Indiflei parte of the city and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 

AU we ask la for n rtlee to examine our Uw and 
compare them rlth other priols bSfS^"** 
buying. CaU or write. 

W. C. Sherwood &, Co., 




r. 




•) 



I 



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H""'— 



DdLUTH EVKNTNG HTCRALTI JANTJABY 27 1890. 




THE REVISION OF FAITH. 



Question That Agitates 
Presbyterianism in a 
Sernaon. 



all 



Dr. 



of the Duluth 



Kingland 
Presbytery States 
the Case. 



Capital Political Sermon 
Briefly Summarized 
Below. 



The revision of the Westminster Con- 
fession of Faith, the initial steps in 
which undertaking have been com- 
menced by the Xew York Presbytery, is 
a matter which it» attracting world-wide 
attention. There is, of irourse, a great 
diversity of opinion on the question. The 
majority, however, apj)ear to be in favor 
of a revision. Following is the gist of a 
sermon on this subject: 

The First Presbyterian church was 
crowded yesterday morning to hear 
the views of Kev. Dr. Kingland on a sub- 
ject whii-h is attracting universal at- 
tention, namely: "Thp Revision of the 
Confession t>f Faith." The text was 
2 Timothy 1, 13. 14: 

Hold fast the form of sound words whicli 
thou hasl heard ot Me, in faith and love. 
That tr>Kx] tUinff which 
keep by the Holy 



which la Christ Jesus 
was committed unto tliee 
Gliost, which dwellelli in us: 

The subject was introduced by a few 
general thoughts having reference to the 
question of which the following is a con- 
densation. 

If it should ever turn out that the 
framers of creeds and confessions have 
gone on a fool's errand — that both the 
will of God and the judgment of man 
pronounce ;igainst them— we must con- 
fess that a prodigious amount of lalxir 
has lieen ei[>ended for the securing an 
unworthy end. 

But this matter will bear talking 
about, notwithstanding the fact that 
some persons pronounce all creeds and 
confessions useless, and worse than use- 
lees, appendages to cburch order. 

But why have a creed at all^ A creed 
is what we believe. Why not spread sails 
and take the "winds of doctrine" as they 
come, and after the fashion of Athens, 
spend our time at nothing else but to 
hear or to tell some new thing. 

The tirs'. reason for not doing that is 
that the B<x)k of Revelation is clostd, 
and the new things nowadays do not 
come by revelation. 

The second reason is that given by the 
text, viz., that the gospel is not some- 
thing that has to be hunted down after 
the fashion at Athens. 

We hear a great deal about revision in 
these days. We recently had a revision 
of the Bible, and many good people got 
a little dismayed, and a good many not 
very good people got a good deal glad, 
because they thought the end would be 
the utter destruction of Christianity, 
but Christianity somehow lived through 
it, because all that was done was to 
make a new translation. And now that 
our ancient and noble confession of faith, 
the banner under which ■10,iX)0,(X)0 of 
Christian people march, and which has 
been the exponent of our faith and our 
progress for over two centuries, is up for 
a re-examination, with a possibility of 
revision. At our general assembly in 
1889, fifteen of the 211 presbyteries 
overtured the assembly, asking for some 
revision of the '"Confettsion of Faith." 
The assembly answered as follows: 
Wliereas, overtures have come from 
fifteen! presbyteries, and whereas, in 
the opinion of many of our ministers 
and people, s<ime forms of statements in 
our "Confession of Faith" are liable 
to misunderstanding, and expose our 
system of doctrine to unmerited criti- 
cism, and. 

Whereas, Before any definite steps 
should be taken for the revision of our 
standards, it is desirable to know 
whether there is any general desire for 
such revision. Therefore. 

Resolved, That this general assembly 
overture to the Presbyterians tlie fol- 
lowing questions: 

1. Do you detire a revision of the 
confession of faith? 

2. If so, in what respects, and te 
what e.xtent ' " 

At the next general assembly which 
meets in Saratoga the third Thursday 
in May, 1890, all of the 211 Presby- 
teries in our body will answer these two 
questions. 1. Do you desire revision' 
2. In what respects and to what ex- 
tent? 

The drift of discussion thus far dis- 
closes these facta: "That no change in 
the doctrinal system is contemplated in 
any <iuarter. (2) That our confession 
should give a more unequivocal expres- 
sion to the universal truth taught in 
Jno. 3, IG. That is to say, that CJod so 
loved the world, etc. (3)' Some think 
that we have long enough been misun- 
derstood atx>ut elect and non-elect in- 
fants, (i) Another fact that is not 
overlooked is that when the confession 
was written the Roman Catholic church 
was the objective t(je. It is thought 
now in many quarters that the heathen 
need the major part of our attention. 
And that instead of holding the old 
view point, we ought to look at things 
from the view point announced in the 
great commission and that the confession 
ought to speak in trumpet tones U) the 
church of its duty to go into all the 
world and preach the gospel to every 
creature. The action of the assembly i's 
not only as yet uncertain, but the most 
it can do in May, 1890 will be to appoint a 
oomnaittee on revision and hear their re- 
port in ISltl, if it is ready even so soon. 
Not even that can be done unless a ma- 
jority of the presbyteries answer the 
questions in the affirmative which the 
assembly has sent down to them for 
their consideration. 

But this action of th^fifteen Presby- 
teries is not of the nature of revolution. 
It simply means this: The confession 
of faith is to be asked whether it is an 
infallible document. It is to be asked 
whether it is sure about every single ut- 
terance it has made. It is to ).>e asked 
whether it is sure that it has the precise 
shade of blue that the apostles and the 
Blessed Master wore. It is a question 
of shades and not a question of fabrics. 
The great system of doctrine will stand, 
notwithstanding the sensational head- 
lines which greet us from the morning 
papers. The Presbyterian church is not 
sick of its oonfession of faith. 

Under every statement of doctrine 
they placed the particular scripture up- 
on which they depended for the state- 
ments that they made. If there is a 
single statement in that confession not 
triumphantly upheld by the word of God 
it ought to come out. If they have in 
any sense lost the central view-point of 
Revelation and established a false cen- 
ter, their work ought to be overhauled 
and reconstructed. 

Some people think that a confession of 
faith ought to be Christii-centric; that 
is, not be written %>} confute Romish 
error, nor to express as a central thought 
the sovereignty of God,but that it ought 
to have Christ as the sun and center of 



its constellation of doctrines. But, for 
my own i>art, I am satisfied with the 
confession as it is. 1 do not object to 
the stress that the confession lays upon 
the divine sovereignty. The Bible is full 
of it. I do not think it would be very 
hard to prove that the expression of His 
love to a fallen race by the gift of His 
S4 n was a sovereign act. It was out of 
His gocxl pleasure. It was an unmerited 
compassion. It was a favor shown to a 
disobedient race that was under the 
curse of the broken law. To lift the 
curse by a gospel provision when justice 
would have been done if penalty had 
t)een rendered, was just such a sovreign 
act as our chief executives exercise in 
the forgiveness of capital offenders who 
have been sentenceti by our courts. I 
cannot, therefore, but think that our 
fathers were wise in making the sov- 
ereignty of God a controlling thought. If 
they could have given a juster emphasis 
to the love that t)eat in that sovereign 
heart they would have given a truer 
Biblical balance and symmetry to the 
confession than it bears today. 

Then as to the elect and non-elect in- 
fants, tliey give me no trouble whatever. 
The Bible does not go into that question 
at any de))th. It uses some illustrations 
but gives no very sweeping generaliza- 
tions. Dr. Hixlge takes the only safe 
ground on this subject. He says that it 
ought to pass for an accepted principle 
of interpretation, that where the Bible 
is silent we are not to presume to speak. 
But the silence of the B*!ripture is 
against such a supposition. The whole 
genius and philosophy of the plan of 
salvation is against it. The silence of 
scripture is to be interpreted as in evi- 
dence that they are saved. The confes- 
sion does not say nor does it imply that 
any are lost. But people persist in say- 
ing that it does. And this is not one of 
the errors to be taken out of the confes- 
sion, but one of the occasions of a per- 
sistent misunderstanding to be re- 
moved by a revision of the confession. 
This can be done by either omitting the 
subject altogether, or restating it in such 
a way that its meaning will be apparent. 
One thing has been made evident by 
the discussions thus far, and that is that 
the church is discovering that revising 
such a carefully worded document as 
the confession of faith is not the small 
matter that it was at first thought to be. 
Ever>- day shows the sublime difficul- 
ties that lie in their path. .'X.nd the 
question returns on itself. How shall 
we revise? (1.) By making a short state- 
ment of modern interpretation? (2.) By 
recasting the whole confession into a 
new one? (3.) By recasting only a few 
chapters, notably, 3 and 10. (4.) liele 
gate tho whole matter to an ecumenical 
council of Presbyterians, throughout the 
world and give us of the Northern Pres- 
byterian church a mere representation 
in the work. But the fact is our church 
has opened the question and it must set- 
tle it. May the Great Head of the 
church give us wisdom for so grave an 
undertaking. 



AMONG THE ORE MEN. 



The Paint Mine in the "Old Red 
Cut" on the 
Range Road 



Iron 



Another Week Shows Only 
Flattering Outlook 
for Ore. 



"We are putting in a steam 
said John Mailman yesterday, 
mine on the Mesabi and shall 
the force of men now 
are underground now and 



our 



pump, 

'at 

ncrease 

We 

have 

in 



WEST END. 



shafts well down, all 

gooil, clean ore. I suppose we'll begin 
shipping alx)ut June, though the rail- 
road company can tell about that better 
than I, for they've got to build into the 
mine. 

"I saw The Herald had something 
atK}ut Col. J.B. Geggie's paint mine. Any 
such ore as he has will make goxl paint. 
The mine is one that was first 
opened by the Iron Range 
road's graders when they were grading 
through the Mesabi heights, hut no- 
body was looking for good ore there, so 
they called it the "Red Cut" and went 
on to Vermilion. I afterwards explored 
and worked a little there, enough to 
show there was good ore in large botlies, 
and then Col. Geggie and his people 
bought it out. I worked there develop- 
ing for them later some. 

"The ore is a pure red liematite, soft 
and something like the Chandler. It's 
of a beautiful purple color and there 
isn't the slightest doubt that it'll make 
a splendid quality of mineral paint. 
Experts all over the country have said 
it is as good as any anywhere, and I 
gu&ss it is. They've got lots of it and 
the mine is close to the road. The ore 
from that mine, too, will tje going East 
this year." 

THE IRON TRADE. 



General and Penwnal News of a t>ay In tlio 
Second Ulviition. 

J. Li. Porter, it is rumored, will become 
a candidate for alderman from the Fifth 
ward. Thos. Craig has decided to l)e- 
come a candidate. He has the support 
of a host of friends and will make a good 
run. 

Jas. Maghan has moved his wall paper 
store from Twentieth avenue to 1610 
West Michigan street. 

Mrs. F. McNorton visited at Cloquet 
with friends Sunday. 

A. H. Larsen has returned from Farm- 
ington, Dakota county, where he has 
b^n visiting with his parents for a short 
Dime. 

The firemen are arranging to give a 
ball shortly. 

The race at Twentieth avenue rink 
Saturday evening was very exciting. 
Gust Johnson was first, G. Lumburg sec- 
ond and Fred Borngesser third. The 
masquerade at Ericikson's Parlor rink 
was very well attended. The prizes were 
given as follows: First, Mrs. A. Jurgen- 
son; second, Fred Stiegler; third. Otto 
Bergijuist. 

The Swedish Methodists held a very 
successful and enjoyable festival or fair 
at their church last Saturday evening. 
Many articles made by the sewing so- 
ciety were sold at a good jirice. 

H. C. Nelson, owing to illness, has de- 
cided not to run for alderman from the 
Fifth ward. Ho favors J. L. Porter. 



NO ALUM — NO AMMONIA - 
NO PHOSPHATES, 



NO LIME- 
IN 



in 



ON POLIT ICS. 

Key. George H. MarClelland Preaches on 
the Abiiorbing Topic. 

The following is a very brief exoerpt 
from a sermon preache<l yesterday by 
Rev. G. H. MacClelland, pastor of the 
First Baptist church. It hiis a special 
bearing on the coming municii>al con- 
test. The text was Eph. G-11, "Put on 
the Whole Armor of God:" 

There is but one thing that we should 
tight, and that is sin in 
every form. You remember the 
great desolation the Nehemiah found in 
Jerusalem. Her people were tew and 
abused, her houses fallen and her peo- 
ple abused. Nehemiah, the old patriot, 
traced the line of the old wall. In the 
morning he said, "Come, let us build the 
walls of Jerusalem, that we \>e no more 
a reproach." And the people answered, 
"Let us rise upward." Now, as to his 
methoil, every man wants to build that 
part of the wall opposite his own house. 

I see that 8<jme of you are going to 
unite as one man against another in 
order to clear the title of your property 
in the Third division beyond any perad- 
venture. Just as you have it in 
your power to do for the clearing your 
city from its reproach of servile and po- 
litical buckling. We are now in the 
throes of a municipal election, and need 
some Nehemiah to lead a reform. First, 
by voting a straight ticket for 
right government, not because 
it is republican, demrx:ratic or 
prohibitionist, but because right 
You had better vote for a man with lit- 
tle brains who would have a moral con- 
science, than a man with much brains 
who is a political truckler. Our city 
seems to have regard for the morals of 
her people. She has banished the 
brothels — to tho Point. She has said thus 
far and no farther can you come. 
There are only two sides to the great 
controversy — the side of right against 
the wrong. Moral, loving people aside 
from creed and party should stand by a 
moral issue. 



A New General Freight .4gent. 
A. B. Plough, general manager of the 
St. Paul & Duluth, announces the ap- 
ix)intment of George W. Ball of Chicago 
to succeed him as general freight and 
passenger agent of the road. Mr. Ball is 
at present general Western agent of the 
Erie Despatch, with office in Chicago. 
Mr. Plough has met him in a business 
way a number of times, and has been 
much impressed with his methods of 
doing business. Mr. Ball is a man of 
family and about 4*^) years of age. He 
will enter upon his new duties Feb. 1. 
Previous to going with the Erie Despatch 
Mr. Ball was with the Merchants 
Despatcjh Transportation company for 
a number of years. 

The Imperial's Output. 

The Duluth Imperial mill is selling 
and grinding about 1400 bbls a day and 
shipping its product east and for export 
as fast as turned out. Last week the 
shipments of the mill were 8057 bbls. 
From the time the mill started up in 
September last to the present it has 
ground about 113,0«0 bbls. The mill, 
while not making as much money as 
some time ago, fjecause of the general 
dullness of the flour market, is making 
some, and its manager sees no reason 
why he should follow the example of 
Minneapolis flour makers and shutdown 
for higher prices. The mill is selling its 
entire product and is storing nothing. 

Register Tomorrow. 



THE PALL.ADIO. 



The Magmlficeat Building About Ready; 
Tenants Move In This Week. 

The elegant office building, Palladio, 
which has been under construction since 
last May, is about ready for tenants, m 
fact a number will move in this week. 
Several have already had their names 
painted in gilt letters on the windows 
and are putting in their furniture. The 
building has l«en constructed in re- 
markably short time and this fact re- 
flects great credit on the builders, 
Messrs. Clark, Raffen &. Co., and on Ar- 
chitect Coffin, the rushing superintend- 
ent, who has been pushing things from 
the start. 

The building has exactly nine 
ty-nine offices, the Superior street 
floor having eight, the second floor seven 
and each of those above, fourteen. Its 
entire rental rolls will aggregate $40,0<J0 
a year, and of this considerably over half 
is now secured and will be in use before 
March 1. 



Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Room D, Hunter 
block. 



I'nprecedented Activity in Furnace Inter 
ests; a .Spccvlatlve Feyer. 

The Cleveland Iron Trade lieview, 
its weekly summary of the ore trade, 
says: 

The most remarkable fact in connec- 
tion with the iron business to-day is the 
unprecedented activity among furnace 
plants. On the first of Januarj .33.3 fur- 
naces, with an aggregate weekly capac 
ity of 174,1)38 tons, were in blast, com- 
pared with 285 furnaces and 111,419 tons 
six months ago. Yet, despite this enor- 
mous production, the unsold stocks on 
hand January 1 were only 187,977 tons. 
Fully as remarkable is the ad- 
ditional fact that, even with 
[practically all the furnace ca- 
pacity of the country in full blast, the 
demand for iron is so great that nearly 
thirty new furnaces are now building, 
most of them in the South, and a third 
as many more are either contracted for 
or under consideration. 

.\dvertising to these facts. The Balti- 
more Manufacturers Record says: "Had 
not the marvelo is resources of the South 
Ijeen developed when they were, the 
world's supply of iron would not have 
Ijeen nearly sufficient for the demand. 
Nothing more forcibly illustrates this 
than the fact that a year or two ago 
Great Britain was shipping immense 
quantities of iron to this country, while 
only last week an order was received in 
this country from England for 50,000 
tons of iron, to l>e delivered at the sea- 
board and paid for as received, and yet 
the order had to be declined." Our im- 
ports of pig iron, meanwhile, show a de- 
cided falling off, having been 183,043 
tons for the eleven months ending No- 
vember 30, 1889. as compared with 131,- 
017 tons for the corresponding period of 
1888. There is very little to report in the 
way of news beyond the rumored pur- 
chase, by the Schlesinger syndi- 
cate, of another mining property. 
The details of the transaction are as 
deal is to be closed today, and means the 
transfer of a well-known and dividend- 
paying property. Local ore dealers re 
{>ort a few minor sales of non-Bessemers, 
but the aggregate of the week's business 
is small compared with the tremendous 
amount of ore already sold. It is re- 
liably stated that some large investments 
are to be made this year upon the Goge- 
bic Iron Syndicate lands, in the vicinity 
of Upson, and that some new ore l>edB 
are to be made accessible as soon as the 
weather will permit. 

Certain it is that the improvement in 
prices and the certainty of the consump- 
tion of every pound of ore that the Lake 
Superior country can produce this year, 
have done much to revive the specula- 
tive fever of a few years ago, and it would 
not be astonishing to see another raid 
upon the ore country by prospectors and 
investors. 



Fiegister Tomorrow. 



Delightful Deerwood. 

Cuyler Adams now has six cottages to 
build on the shores of Serpent and Reno 
lakes at Deerwood, all for Duluth peo 
pie who will put in their summers, or a 
portion of the season, at that most 
beautiful retreat. Among the innova- 
tions which will probably be made there 
early next spring will be a couple of 
small steam craft, several sail boats, and 
a canoe club will also probably be or- 
ganized to explore and travel about the 
fifty or more lakes within a few miles 
distance. The place bids fair to become 
a popular resort for first-class pe«jple 
this year in a much larger degree than 
ever before. 



A Warning to SIcaterii. 
Twelve or thirteen skaters hatl a nar- 
row escape Saturday evening when the 
ice floe moved out from the shore on the 
lake. They were skating alwut, not 
noticing the change in the wind, until a 
sudden tremor of the ice frightened 
them and they turned for the shore. 
Less than half an hour elapsed before 
the entire Ixxly of ice was moving out 
rapidly, and in two hours it was three or 
four miles away. 



Around the World. 



There was a time when a man who had 
circled the globe was a nine day's won- 
der, and if dime museum managers had 
existed then, the traveled individual 
would have been exhibited as a "freak." 
Now such a voyage is so common that 
we have ceased to regard the world's cir- 
cumference of 2.5,000 miles as anything 
large. But distance can be measured in 
another way— by the difficulty and ex- 
pense of overcoming it. The Burlington 
system of railroads has 7000 miles of 
track. Do you realize what a lot of rails 
it would take to string out 1-1,000 miles 
in a single line.-' How much money they 
would cost? How many great cities and 
thriving towns you would pass in travel- 
ing that distance? Buy a ticket over 
the finest railrod in the West, and in- 
vestigate. For information more in de- 
tail, call on any of the Burlington agents, 
or those of connecting lines, or write to 
W. J. C. Kenyon, Gen. Pass. Agent C., 
B. & N. R. R., St. Paul, Minn. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 



Kast Kud Skating Kink. 
David N. Morison, champion fast 
skater of Duluth, and W. W. Brown, 
champion fast skater of Wisconsin, will 
tkate three races at above rink on the 
foil iwing dates for $50 a side and a gold 
metlal to be given by the rink, Friday 
evening, Jan. 24th, distance, three miles; 
Tuesday evening, Jan. 28th, distance, 
three miles; and Thursday evening, Jan. 
'.iO, distance, five miles, the one winning 
best two out of three races to be declared 
the winner. Judges to be selected on 
the ice. Walkers military band will be 
in attendance. 



1^^ I c^, 

C R E A M 

Baking Powder 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for more than a quarter of a 
oentury. It is used by the United Stales Government. En(J-»rscd by the heads of the 
Qnst Universities as the Strongest, I'urest and Most He:ilt!7ul. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO. 

nW YORK. CHICAGO. ST. LOUIS. SAN FRANCISCO. 



Boi i 




B 



R 



O 



W 



N 



R 



O 



T 



H 



E 



R 



S 



ESTABLISHED 1882 



Hotels, Restauiants, 



—AND— 



TAKE NOTICE I 

We are agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The Best In the World. 



Get our prices and vou will l>e per- 
fectly satisfied. 



FOR SALE: 



50-U--ln Hcreage, 
48-15--ln kwL 
Superior Street 
Dock Property, - 



-12, 

1. 

- I 



HARWOOD'S 

Cit| Iransportation FreigH and Express, 

DRAYS. 



Office, 17 First Avenue West. 



WANTED I 



Purchasers for 



Iliree Valuable and Nice-Lying Lots 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFiCE 



17 First Avenue West. 



Lots for Sale as 
as $25 each. 



low 



APPLY TO 



19 West Supedor Street. 



SPECIAL 



umm 



160 Acres in 9-49-16. 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



SPECIAL Bums. 



I 60 Acres, sect 
320 " " 



80 " 

160 " 

70 " 

80 " 

80 " 

Lot 2, block 
$326. 
2 Lots, block 5, West End, SI 050 

We have exclusive sale of this 
erty. 



30, 



on 2-48-16. 
" 18-60-16. 
12-60-16. 
" 20-60-16. 
" 26-60-16. 
" 28-60-16. 

" 27-60-16. 

Dodge's addition. 



SCHILLING'S ORCHESTRA 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 



ROOM <14 PASTORET-SIENSOI BLOCK, 

DULUTH, - . MINN. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY. 



MINNESOTA. 



ttv. Newly 

KIncHt sample room In town. lilvery In 



Klrnt cla.<>s in every way. 

KIncHt ganiL " 

counectiou. WILI lAM GRANT, Prop. 

Open November I. 



en 



-:- WILL BE SOLD VERY CHEAP -:- 



--■ 



-ALSO- 



cl. 



Tliree Good Building Lots on Nintli Street, 



A LOT 



prop- 



LAZIER BROS., 

26 Exchange BIdg. 

' — ' " » 

NEW HOTEL. 

— THt: — 




80 

40 

320 

80 
48-15. 



9-49- 1 5. 



I -49- 1 5. 



-36-48-15. 



Water Front, 



2 Grand Avenue tots. 

2 Lots on Central Avenue. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $1750. 

I Cottage House, with 
well. West Duluth, SI 180. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $2000. 



Terms on Houses, U Casli, Balance 
1,2 and 3 years at 8 Per Cent. 



H. P. MILLS, 



4ie m 411 riRsi iiiiioiial un BuiLOiiii. 



8t, Paul, Minn., 

Cor. 4th and WaHlilnffton St». 

On Cable Car I.lnf. Bent ThWu in the Norm 
west. KaJeit tRXK) auO Ipwai-ds. 

W. H. Babnzs. Manager. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 



FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table is supplied and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



Dr. E.G. Wests 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT 



Spi'Cino for Hyot' 
fulnenM, Mentttl I>.p 



la. I'./zii,«-.. KjlM, N<'Um!;,'io, Wake 

, I, S"tt)'f;iriif fif thf iJmin. rt! 
lultint; in tn^ariM> .i/nl ii ii'.mi.' to rnl-'ei y <l<-fav on'l 
death. Pr**matun' Old Agv, Il.irreiim-B.-*, I.oh^ <>r Power 
In either sex. Involiinr.iry l.os>«>., ai«l Kpcrinutui tbu-a 
r»ii«ed hy orer^jiortion of thu br.iin. fit'ir-nl>u>e (ir 
over-in<!!il^-iicc. Each box rontain> one monlir-* irca*- 
ment Si a l>nx, or nix fur $r>, rent by niall im-i' ill. 
With eiuh order for kIx lioxfx. Hill xeixl |iiir Jia-vi 
^iiaraot^e to refund momv If (ho «r<-attn>nl lallsttj 
cure. I>iiaraut«e9 Iwucil ami t;<-*tiume sold otUjr by 

Boyce & Tot man. Pho«,'nlx Drutr Stor«, and 
7 West Suporltjr street, sole agx.-nt8, Uuluth 
Minn. 



-IN 



BLOCK 12, 





MICHIGAN STREET, 



FOR SALE 



-AT- 



Below MafW Pfice 



If taken at once. 



$8.00--S-5.U£* 

CULLUM, 

_^_ Painless Dentist. 

Koom 1-7. 406 West Superior Street. 
FariruMon Block. Duluth 





Near Third avenue east 



i 



All hese are well located and very accessible. 
Good schools and graded streets close by. 



Apply by letter or in person to 



"ED," 



ajLj^iEi ECEis^aJLnD. 



MEMBERS OF THE 

DDLDTfl CLEARING HODSE ASSOCIATION. 



Lot sold next 
property for $335. 



this 



GREAT ENGLISH REMEDY! 

Murray's Specific. 



iTsJcWMlca A gi:arante(. cure for all ner 
vouf* dlxoase such as Weak 
Mt'inory. UwB Untln Power, 

Hysteria. Headache, Pain In the 
Back. Nervous Proetratlon. 
Xjeuccrrhoea, Universal Lasst- 
tu<i<\ Seniiniil WeakncsR. linpo- 
ttnoy and (ff neral loss »f power 
of the Geberatlve Organs;— In ' 
either sexT caused by Indlscre- 
Ont^TlUafr tlon or overexertion, and which 
ultimately lead to Premature TrmM* — — 
Old Afre. iDSunlty andConsurnp- 
tlon. 11.00 or a box or six boxes 
for 16.00. Sent by mall on re- 
ceipt of.prtce. KuH partlcalars 
In pamphlet, sent free to every 
applicant. We Oaarantee Hlx 
Boxes to cure any case. For 
every 16.00 order recelve<i, we 
send six boxes, with a written 
eruarantee to refund the ""^^^y^ft^j J»|t|«f, 
If our Speclflc does not effect a cure. Address 
•U communications to the sole manufacturers 
THS MURUAT MEDICINK CO. 
Kanaaa Cltr, Mo 
Sold In Dalatb by Mu WIrth 




Address 



LS., 



PostoflRce Box A A. 



American Exchange Bank 
Bell iiL Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of Comnnerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. 

S300,000 
I 00,000 

1 ,000,000 
100,000 
100,000 
1 00,000 
260.000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

1 0.000 

1 00,000 

26,000 




R. KROJANKER. 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 

Altering, repairing, cleaning and dyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty. i9'Good workm^i- 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



209 East Superior Street, 



Duluth, Minn. 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Rooms mo. ill and S12, Dulutb Union lational M BuildiBi. 



ig§ 



'^»- 



4 



^EEBKSm^ ^ 



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IH.«.-»1I.. I <1 I ■» I . 



J ^- .t" * . ' 



r**.*. 



c ^ ' « t j y* I ^Jfc» » »— ' 



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liux^urn lEvrntmo hebaij): ja^tjary 27, i«9o. 




A SPLENOIO STATEMENT. 



PERSONAL. 



The Associated Banks' Weekly 

Statement Shows Easy 

Money. 



The Visible Decrease; Prices 

Elsewhere; Market 

Notes. 



There was a more active wheat market 
today. At the opening it was very weak 
and heavy, not only here but at all mar- 
kets. There were no exports, cables 
were easy and dull, and the visible de- 
crease wa8 small in comparison with the 
light receipts at all primary points. Sell- 
ers at Chicago were numerous and that 
market was verj^ bearish, but with the 
report that Hutchinson was buying and 

that there was an under feeling that it 
was time for an upturn. As the day ad- 
vanced this feeling became more preval- 
ent and gradualb' the demand increased. 
The day's decline at Chicago was all re- 
gainetl. while the close here was very 
tirm. 

Nothing (vas done in cash. Xo. 1 
hard cash closed at 7"?^, No. 1 northern 
75*^, No. '2 northern 73. January No. 1 
hard 771^2, No. 1. northern 75»^, ail nom- 
inal. May opened at 82 ^^g. "^8 below Sat- 
urday's close, dropped to Sil, with good 
sales at that, advanced and closed tirm [ 
at S2\^. May No. 1 northern closed at I 
79^'. 



Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Crittenden of Lake 
City, are visiting Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Men- 
denhall. 

Mrs. H. F. Williamson is spending the 
winter at Mount Clemens, Mich., where 
she is getting the benefit of the medi- 
cinal springs. 

A son was born last night to Mr. and 
Mrs. D. H. Williams. Mr. Williams is a 
very happy yardmaster today. 

Mr. H. P. Haskell, right-of-way agent 
of the Duluth Jc Winnipeg road, is in the 
citv. 

Mr. K. D. Chase, brother of Mr. A. S. 
Chase, this city, is up from Faribault. 

Mr. J. B. Dowling, the St. Louis capi- 
talist, is in the city. 

The funeral of the late Mrs. Wells, 
wife of Maj. Guy Wells, was held yester- 
day afternoon at St. Paul's church. It 
was largely attended, many sorrowing 
friends following the body to its last 
resting place. The pallbearers were 
Messrs. C. M. Vance, D. A. Duncan, W. 
W. Davis, H. M. Peyton, Dr. S. S. Wal- 
bank and J. H. Upham. 

Mr. Smith, sujjerintendent of the 
Kelly Island Lime and Transport com- 
pany, is going to Sandusky, Ohio, on a 
visit with his wife for their health about 
Feb. 1, and will be gone a week or two. 

Miss Kate Lackey of 1005 East Third 
street held a very pleasant reception 
yesterday in honor of her mother, who 
was called home last evening. 



FROM WEST OOLOTH. 



Opening the Bids for the Car 

Company's Village of 

Houses. 



The Term of Village Justices; 

General Notes of 

a Day. 



KEEP RIGHT ON GOESSING. 



Seventy-five Dollars Cash to 
Closest Guessers 
Duluth. 



on 



Imperial Mill'* Output. 
The output of the Duluth Imperial 
mill last week was !>21)0 bbis. an average 
of loiS bbls a day. Shipments for the 
week were 6840 bbls. The tlour trade is 
reported at Minneapoli<; to be very dull 
and slow, and it is not a -uve here. 



Thf Visible -Supply, 

The visible supply ol wheat in this 
country shows a ilecrease for the week 
of 3t3t>.a)0 bu against a decrease of l.OCO,- 
561 bu for the week last vear, and of 
(XX),1(>4 bu for the week in 1888. Corn 
shows an increase of GlS,i;iOO bu against 
•45:^,877 bu for the week last year. Oats 
show a decrease of 139,000 bu against 
276,766 bu for the week last year. The 
total visible supply of wheat is now 32.- 
152,000 bu against' 35,5i>5,-162 bu at the 
date last year and of 41,761,125 bu at the 
date in 1888. 



Two Prizes Offered for the 

Contest; from Now to 

May. 



The Day's Movement. 

Carson track: Wheat 13 corn 1, oats 
7. Receipts: Wheat 17,843 bu, com 
6269 bu, oats 31,242 bu. Shipments: 
Wheat 7101 bu. Minneapolis reportetl 
204 cars on track, against 88 Saturday 
.-ind 291 last Monday. Receipts there: 
Wheat 118,320 bu. Shipments: Wheat 
19,140 bu. flour 18,330 bu. Chicago cars: 
Wheat ■Jl, corn 373, oats 155. 



N'orthweitteru Stocks. 

Wheat in store at Duluth, Minneapo- 
lis and St. Paul, in public elevators, ag- 
gregates 12,544,410 bu, an increase for 
the week of :?9,090 bu. Corn in store at 
Dultuh and Minneapolis, 545,106 bua de- 
crease of 71.671 bu and oats in store 
88389 bu. 



Weekly Statement. 

Showing the stock of grain in store at 
Duluth (by grades; for the week ended 
Saturday, Jan. 25, 1890: 

Bushels. 

3,3«,fl!e 

l,(ioa,U74 

*/7,'»il 

Ml 

61t> 

16.45(1 

e,»u< 

1,SS) 

4T,m»i 



•4,il«.3Ul 
"3,000 



1.2^.371 

t«,i4;i 

oUl,4ltt< 

435. 13:.' 
W.Tll 



No. 1 hard 

No. 1 northern 

No.:: northern 

No. 1 reU wiuter 

No. 3 re<i winter 1' 

No. 3 spring- wbe«t 

Nojfrade 

Kejeeted and condemned. '."..." 
Special bin 

Total 

Afloat In the harbor 

Total 

Increaae for the week 

In attire a year a^jo ...V. 

Increase a year agro 

Corn i n store 

Decrease for the week...... 

Oats In store 

Increase for the week . ..".'. 

Wheat in store at Minneapolis!!!! 

Wheat in jti. re at St Paul "'325.'(J0U 

lncrea.se wheat at Minneapolis 33ju- 

Decrease wheat iit vSt. Paul. . . . 'jum 

Corn m store at Miiinedpolis 313'fj«s 

«Jat8 in store at Mitiueapolis «(•,'«.$ 

THAT MINE DEAL. 
The Bl«r £nglUh Deal About to go Through 
sure Enough. 
As stated last week in The Herald 
there IS every probability that the big 
deal between Vermilion mine owners 
and the English syndicate will be con- 
summated. A price on several valuable 
properties has been given, and if upon 
report this price provesto be satisfac- 
tory the money will Uepaid and Eng- 
lish capital put in. 

If the deal is closed an immediate 
development of the property will take 
place and railroad facilities given 
the mines which wiU be opened. 
it la stated by eome that 
hiB investment of English money 
in these iron properties means the de- 
velopment of these mines partiallv to 
furnish a new steel and iron plant that 
the English syndicate is to erect in this 
city. Should this rumor be true, it will 
be<»me a matter of even greater interest 
to this city. 



[Xotice that all city letters put in the 
Duluth postotlice must have two cents 
prepaid, otherwise The Herald will not 
receive the guesses, for it will not pav 
postage on "guess" letters.] 

How many inhabitants has Duluth ? 
That is a question for the readers of The 
Herald to answer. By "Duluth" is meant 
the city proper. West Duluth, Liikeside 
and Le.ster Park, all to all intents and 
purposes parts of the city. 

The Herald proposes to make it an 
object for its readers to guess as to the 
number of people in the city and the 
three adjoining suburbs mentioned 
above. In brief. The Herald will otfer 
prizes to the two persons guessing the 
number or nearest the number of 
inhabitants shown by the returns 
of the census enumerators. The Herald 
will give to such successful guessera two 
cash prizes, * 

First Prize t-JO in Gold. Second Prize $25 
In Gold. 

Guesses will be received at this office 
until the day when the enumerators of 
the census begin their work. 



Population Contest Coupon. 

My guess as to the number of inhabitants 
in Duluth. West Duluth, Lakeside and 
Lester Park to be shown by returns of the 
census enumerators In the summer of l.-HO 

IS as foUows: 



The Minnesota Iron Car company 
opened the bids for the construction of 
150 houses at West Duluth Saturday at 
the general otBce in Xew York. The 
successful bidders will be puljlished in a 
day or two. O. G. Traphagen sent on 
the plans Saturday night after they had 
been figured on here. 

Xorthwestern Railroader: The Min 
nesota Iron Car company of Duluth is 
now turning out live cars per day, the 
workmanship on and general appearance 
of the cars being e.xcellont. The com 
pany has just shipped some cars t(j the 
C. A. A C. railway, which are the Iron 
Car company's standard 34-foot bo.\ cars, 
60,000 pounds capacity. The body of the 
car does not ditfer from any Hrst-class 
box car, the sills being made of tubes 
instead of woo<l. These cars, from 1000 
to 3000 pounds lighter than wooden cars, 
have a capacity from 10,000 to 25,000 
pounds greater. 

In another column is the statement of 
the xManufacturers bank. It is the 
strongest ever issued at the village. It 
shows that West Duluth is no mushroom 
town, and with that of the Bank ot West 
Duluth, publishetl Saturday, makes a 
strong advertising card. It has deposits 
of $52,880, loans of mi,(Xil and stock and 
profits of $28,167. 

Pete McCormick, the carpenter, fell 
from a high scaffold at the Iron Bay 
Saturday. He was pretty well 
up, but his injuries were not 



A Necktie, Although Ifour Bosom Companion, is Also a Tale 
- Bearer of Your Tastes. 

Please bear In mind that MONDAY, JAN 27 
we will make prices sell one of the best assorted 
stocks of FIN^NECKWEAR in the city, 
f^ . ^'^^ "o^'ce will be given other lines which are 
to be sold proportionately low. 

•KILGORE & SIEWERT 

Fine Hats and Men's Furnishings, 

ST. LOUIS HOTEL BLOCK, DULUTH. 
Store closes at 6:30 P. M. 




•^, 



d'tut/^ad^^ 



LOANS MADE 



-AT- 



6 AND 

MONEY ON 
JON 



7 PER CENT. 

H^ND-NO r>ELA.Y-. 



ES 



409 



-:-&-:- B R A E 

Real Estate and Loans, 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 



O 
O 

(£ 

LU 

o 
cc 

o 

o 

h- 

co 

h- 
z 
< 

Q. 



M GREAT SACRIFICE SALE 




1,1 

II 



Will continue Fifteen Days -until stock is re- 

MUbT REDUCE, even at a great loss. 

Our lowp'ices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Busim:ss Existence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire'Jstock ; 'besides 
you would not stop to read them, but will quote 
afew to give you an idea. r— — • 

, .S7.49 buy > anTelegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat 
worth at least $15. ' 

S9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat 
worth at least $ I 8. 

The same reductions on 



all 



.--V 



Whole nuuiber of inhabitant-t- 



Name of (raeiMer — 



Rertldence of gnemt^t 



Date, Jan. %7. 1800. 



Cut out this coupon, make your guess upon 
it and send It to 'PliC Daily Herald. All guesses 
mu.-t l)o made on this coupon. Onlv une iruets 
allowed to a single croufH)u. lu ease there shall 
be two or more answer* of the same uurat)er 
which Dumber is nearest or next t<i nearest 
that returned hy the euumerators. then the 
wiiiner.-i sh^ll l)e. in either ca^. the ones whose 
couptjns ()ear the earliest date. 

Address all answers to 

"GcEss •• care The Dally Herald. 
Duluth, Minn. 



and 

fol 



H^v Serve as a Guide. 

In order to give data that is of interest 
mav be of value. The Herald reprints the 
lowing- from the directory report of lH.sit but 
It must be remembered that this paper' does 
not vouch for th-! accuracy of the opinions set 
lorth or the tSirures jriven. In fact It will he 
well to recollect that the ordinary directory 
Uffurea and estimates are most alwaysc padded 
sotnetimes fearfully, and must usually be 
scaled down very materially. These are the 
directory statements: 



works 

shaken 
serious. 

.\ttorney Thoiuas went to St. Cloud 
Saturday evening on a short business 
trip. 

The Ladies Aid society of the Presby- 
terian church meets with Mrs. Gilchrist 
Thursday afternoon. 

L. Q. Jonte has taken office rooms on 
the second door of the Hurst block, 
opposite Phillips hotel. 

S. C. Murphy of The Sun has returned 
from his visit to Morris, Minn. 

Mrs. E. J. JLiuther is visiting her par- 
ents at Aitkin, Minn. 

J. H. Phillips will complete the Crosley 
building on Central avenue this week. 

The Lrfidies Aid society of the Metliod- 
ist church meets Thursday with Mrs. 
S. Jones on Second avenue, near Second 
street south. 

The morning papers have been enjoy- 
ing themselves over a controversy in re- 
gard to the term of office of n 'village 
justice. If they would take the trouble 
to examine the village statutes, which 
are considered pretty good authority, 
they would tind that justices are elected 
for a term of two years. Two village 
justices were elected at the general elec- 
tion last March, and unless one or both 
desire to resign their positions candidates 
for official preferment at the coming 
election will be under the necessitv of 
laying their wills in other directions'. 

The News stated an injunction was 
served on U. W. Hoyt, assignee of 
Meagher & Kennedy, restraining him 
from selling gootls until further order of 
the court. It comments on the matter 
by stating that Mr. Hoyt is a man of 
good ability and will faithfully dis- 
charge his duties in an impartial man- 
ner. So far it is good. But it goes on 
to state that it is to be hoped that the 
affairs will be placet! in the hands of St. 
Paul parties. Now, if Mr. Hoyt 
'8 a man of ability 

why ^ this desire to change? 
Mr. Kennedy has rights to be protected 
as well as the 8t. Paul creditors, and 
everyone believes that Mr. Hoyt is a 
capable and impartial man. 

Z. H. Austin, of the tirm of McFarlane 
& Austin, has received the articles of 
incorporation of the Duluth Investment 
company from the department of state, 
which will be published in The Herald 
today. 

See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. Macfarla?.'e & Austin. 



SUPERIOR TRANSFERS. 

Ustof Doiigrlas County Transfers For the 

Past 34 ilotirs. 
■'''.?.',^..? ^Tant to Luther E Newport, 
J"" West Seventh street, KIvs add 



4tM. 



I 

.$ 500 



OeorRe E Chapman to Camuerw White- 
man ne''4 of blk: 17, Tweuty-flrst 
street, hujierior i ^qq 

C C Newman to Sui)erior Land com- 
pany, 1 41:,' and iU, CauLlir street, 
Ueaus add „. 

Mary A Safford to William' H 
p-irt of fr blk T5, First. W .s 

M 1 Hulitt to James Harden 
n .U. HMH-i:t 



JBTICLES Of IICOBPOB/ITIOH 



— OK THE— 



McCarty, 

swi» of 

r {'°ir*.."j*?''i'ni' to Charles' LCatiin. 
^' 'j -if. *.».♦!. -T.3«, ai, at, 31. :u. bit 

1'?^; 1 11 and 1»', blk lii«, W S, First 

WWW inter t<i Charles L Catlln, dia- 

gram 1 isr, and l.»i, Superior 
John C Sjxxmer lo t'liarles h Catlln 

I 1° r^" °' ^"^ of °»^^4 of »^^*- 14-48-14 ' 
John B I^i Fovre to William H Patlison 

lo. «, .. 17. IS blk 11. MIddleton ...; 

■l,^} •^' '•'""ou to Jot n A Hordon. blk 
•«. Hest I'hirty-Hfth strwt, Superior 



40 
10,000 




440 

3,215 
1 
1 

3.000 
375 




„ . _, - -- — ouryOvercoats, 

buits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishing Gaods. No reserve We must reduce 
our stock at least $^5,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mil,i weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels as to^take 'the loss.SnCall andBsee 
our^ prices. L,,, "" «.j -■ 



M.'-S.IBURROWS & CO. 



o 
o 

id 
of 

LJ 
Q 
QC 
O 

O 
CO 



OOIUTH REALTY INVESTMENT 



ASSOCIATION. 



Charles L Catlln to E W Winter. 1 IB. iV 
IX. ly, blk 3; 1 I. 2, ;i, 4, 5, 6, 7. 8, blk 4^ 
1 6, H. II. 12. 13, 14, liik 5; i «! 7, 8 2 *' 
2ft, 2»i, 27. 2X, bit e, Catlins ...... ..' ' 

Kobert J Scott to Horatio Lawson, w'i 



245 



13 transfers; total consideration ... . $19,419 
REA L ESTA TE. 
A Kecortl of the Keal Kstate Transfers for 
34 Hours Kndinx "t Noon. 

"•,^.^J°i*'.\'°„",*f Doran. all bl,.8 2 and 
3: 1 8, 9, 10. 11, blk 7; 1 5, 6, 7, S. blk «• 

5, b. blk 20; I 7, 8, 11, 12, blk 22; all blk 

2i>, Minnewaukan add. . . 
H J Dodjre to O Hanson. 1 9. blk " 'l'7 

I>od»res add 

Ejjj^tJriJley to W C Stearns," e4 of sw'i^; 

^ .EJl>i<-'l£erman to iVaink Anderson i 8 

blk l.S West End add... 
James Drohan to Kate Walsli, i'257' 'lil'k 

■t8. Second 

West Duluth Land company to iliiiro 

Lorleherjr, 1 3 ami 4. t.lk 7«, Fourth 
Joel Colby to George Taylor, lu acres in 

nwi», (w)tt-l3 

*-' "J HaldwiD toL, M Wiricuts,'i"4l','4;i 44 

. ''tj-^u's Hvenue, Lower Duluth 

J ^ Daniels to F W Eaton, sei* ue>,. 's'l- 

H J Dodjre't'o' J F ■Fr'i»j8'.'l Y, '8.'b'lk' ' I'f. 
Dodjfcs add 



« 5,'JOO 

330 

4,800 

3.')0 

10,0UI 

''Olt 

1.00O 



400 



ARTICLE I. 

Dul*irth"H.^.V,,°f *•"! t-orporatlon sliall be the 
Pr"nc niK,l ^";7«ff"*'n» Association, and Its 
of rinl', ..' «> "^ I'usitiess shall be in the city 
or Duluth, Miuuesoia. 

ARTICLE IL 

KiPifv'^S'''"'" ' ""f "re of its business and object 
r',ii,^^'"i.*i"«';.o*"'''^' Improviiisr, seiliS^ 
easiujr and dealinfr In lands. teuem.nt« liew-d- 
taments and such other business as natrallv 
pertains to its principal object aforesaid.- 

AKTICLE in. 

<l.^!''?stJl'"!!?,?*i''"?.*'"'" .*'««■'" «" February the 
nrst, isfti, and shall c-ontlnue thirty years. 

AUTICLE r\'. 

The amount of the capital stock of the cor- 
ponitlonshal beone hundrinl thousand dol- 
f V : ""'""^ '.'"" five thousand sharc-s of twen- 
ne'uUof^t\■m^'"^■*'^"'^ in monthly insT^ I- 
iin.ut.sor tlfty t-eiits per share and at such 
limes and under Mjoh reg-ulations as may be 
prescrihe.1 by the by-laws; but said assoclati<m 
may transact businl-ss and go into o^rat oi^ 
when one thousan.l shares sHall have ?.^.n sub 
scr.btM for and taken. The Board of Di^ctors 
sha I have p<>wer u issue said shares from tine 
to time as they may decide by resolution 



Humphreys' 

Dr. Hi m-HKKvs- .■irhnn.-s arescientlflcally and 
carefully prepari-d pri'scrlpllons ; u.se(l for inaiiy 
years lu private practice with fui'cefis,;iiiilf()rover 
Ihlrtv y.ars iijst-d by tlu- pcoijU-. Evt-ry khigle Spe- 
cltlc,ls a .special cure for Uie disease iianied 

These Specifics cure wlttoul drugKlne, 'pnre 
!.°*i'L''*'**"'^'"« '?■-' «>»'<''", and arelu fact and 
deed the HOTereiKuremediesof the World. 



LIST or PRINCEPAI. K08. CCRKS. 

I Kevers, Congestion, inflammation 
3 W ormst Worm Fever. Worm Colic 
3 rrjina Colic, or Teething of Infants 
DiBrrhea, of Children or Adults 



S l>T8eDlery< Griplntf. Bilious Colic. 
o Cholera Morbus, Vomiting.... 

7 CoUKhn, Cold, llronchlils 

8 NenralKia, Toolba(*e, Faceache 

9 Headaches* SlckUeatiaclie, Vertlno 
IlyspepMla, Billo- "• •- 



PEIOES. 

.•i.-i 



10 



>U8 f^tonjach. 



••2."» 



11 HopbreMsedor PainralFeriods. 
'■"iin - 



, Kniptlons. 
jlnF 



M 

.a.5 

.2.5 
.30 

.5» 

..to 

..10 



Vi Whitea, too Profuse Perlixls.. 

13 C'ronp. CouKh, Dlffleult Breathing 

14 >«Hlt Itheum, Erj-sltielas, Knii ' 

15 Kheumaiism, Kheamatlc Pol 
1« Fever and Ague, Chills, Malarlu 

17 Piles, "'.'"d or bleeding 

19 <'aiarrh, lufltienza. Cold In the Head 
tiO AV hooping <'ough> Violent Coughs. 
si <'cnerBl Oehilily.ynyslcal Weakness 

«7 Kidney Diseaae 

28 Nervous llebiliry l.OO 

• »? ' rl"»ry Weaknesa, Wetting B.>d. ..50 
.T.4 Uiseases of the Heart, Palpitation 1.00 

Sold by Drugglgrs, or sent postpaid on receipt 
OT price. Dr. Humphreys' Maniau (144 pages) 
richly bound lu cloth and gold, mailed free. 
Hnmphreyw'.McdiclneCo.liifr Fulton St. N Y. 

SPECIFICS. 



CEflTIFICATE OF AMEiOED 

ARTICLES OF lUCflfiPOBATlOII 




—OF THE— 



DULUTH mCLINE BAILWA! 

COMPANY. 



Mortga ge Sale. 



AKTICLE V. 



700 



11 transfers: consideration.. 



J23.625 



Register Tomorrow. 



This volume contains 3.:iU9 more names tlian 
n *^, tu' '*lVe: » tot"' of '«•»»' adult citizens of 
Duluth; ihis sum multiplied by 2',. the factor 
which has been found to truthfully represent 
the women anci children not included in the 
list, Indicates a p<jpulatlon of 4»>,92o for Du- 
luth, a train of lo.ijuu inhabitants within a year 
and the prediction is ventured that if a full' 
complete and accurate count be made 
[K'rienc^d and competent canvassers 
b(»,i«K) souls will be found within the 
rate limits of Duluth in iseo. 

Population by Years. 

1*^, United States census.. 

l>^o, state census 

1*^ directory estimate 

1'^''7, directory estimate 

l'*v\ directorj estim.ite 

l*-!*, directory estimate . ". 



Register Tomorrow. 



IHstriet Court. 

Before Judge Stearns one of a number 
of suits against the Duluth Terminal 
Railway company was tried and a ver 
diet gained for the plaintiff. This was 
followed by a jiersonal injury damage 
8Uit agamst the Gas & Water company 
which IS now on trial. Before Judge 
i^nsign the last of the struck jurv cases 
against the Xorthwestern Fuel company 
W!i8 on trial all day. " 



Th. 



. hitrhest amount of indebtedness which 
said a.s*x.-,at ion shall *t any time tacur shall 
bo ntty thousaud dollars. «"«-ur suaii 



PIONEER FUEL CO., 



WEATHEU FORKCAST. 

Jan. 27. —Forecast for Duluth and j 
vicinity torJ4hourncummencinQ 10 a.m. 
today : Colder ; fair weather. 

Obsekver, Signal Office. 



STATE 9F MINNESOTA, t 
CouNi V OP St. Louis, f 

KNO'V ALL MEN BY THESE PKESENTS, 
,, . ^ '"t, we. Jacob K. Myers, president, and 
ucujum n K Myers, secretary of the Duluth 
incline Uadway Company ,ornunized and doing 
busiues!^ under the laws of the State of Miiine- 
.sota bei lit duly and sevcally sworn, do hereby 
lerlify and detHjsc that, at a re«-ular meoIitiB- 
of the beard of directors of the Duluth Incline 
Hai way Lompany,held at the cmpanys omct- 
in the Board of Trade building:, Duluth, Minne- 
sota on I be sixth (6) day of November, l«sn. at 
tcti aO) o clock lu the foren<x)n, it was resolved 
that the lameof the Duluth Incline Hallway 
tompan3l)e changed i<. the Duluth Bell Line 
Kallwuy ..oropany,and ti ;it Article "f (onei of 
the .\rtl rle-s of Incorporation of the Duluth 
Incline iailway Omipany bo changed and 
amended by in.-ortiiiK therein the words, "Du- 
luth Ui'li Line Uailway Company," in lieu and 
stead of he words, "Duluth Incline Hallway 
(.onii>an> ,"eo that the said article shall read - 
loiiows : 

AKTICLE 1. 

I 'J'.'iecotpomtenameof the c-orporation shall 
lie Duluth Belt Line Hallway Company." Tlie 
general nature of its business shall be to sur- 
vey, locate, construct, eoulp, maintain, otter- 
ate and run a railway, with one or more track- 
or lines ol road, with all uccossary side tracks 
turn-outs branch lines and all uec-essary ma- 
chine she ps, warehouses, scorehouses, eleva- 
tors, depots, station houses. ' 
Ings, stru .•tures. right " 
lauds au<l 



The 



AUTICLE VI. 

^/J^sand places of residence of the in- 
'"' """ ■ . ^ j^|_ 



{^^.^•"•itors ot the sai i asstx-iatiou are 

Minn. 
Minn 



CITY BRIEFS. 



tjy ex 
nearly 
corpo- 



3,470 

l»,ttlO 
22.000 
3l),UO0 
37,000 
47,900 



AFFECTS MANY. 



Property 



Title* in Helena Seriously 
Affected by a Flaw. 
Helena, Mont., Jan. 27.— A business 
sensation waa created in Helena yester- 
day by the finding of flaws in the title 
to valuable realty in this city, Great 
t alls and Anaconda. The propertv in 
question IS valued at several millions, 
and includes two valuable additions to. 
Melena, the townsite of Great Falls and 
also part of the townsite of Anaconda. 
lUe man who proposes to profit by the 
flaw IS R G. Daviee, a Helena attor- 
Day. 

The land was located by scrip, the 
powers of attorney accompanying which 
have been declared void by the supreme 
courts of Arkansas, Kansas and Cali- 
fornia. The parties alfected are among 
the most wealthy in Helena, and inoludb 
Governor S. T. Hauser and other 
taliflte. A great deal of the 
is 



To .Make Mineral Paint. 
Co\. J B. Geggie of this citv, who owns 
iron lands in 20-59-14, on the xMesabi 
range, has a rich deposit of o.^cide of iron 
which he has had e.tamined by e.xperts 
in different parts of the country, who 
unite in saying it is very rich in mineral 
paint and will produce more and better 
paint than any other in the 



-, , -. . , • , - — country. 

Gol. Geggie has decided to erect a paint 
factory here in the spring to manufactu 
the paint. 



re 



Real Estate and Insuraore. 

. If you wi.sh t« invest in real estate or 
insure your prope-ty, call and see Men- 
den hall A: Hwpee, as they have the 
largest list of real estate and write 
surdnce in the best 



in- 



sented in the citv. 



companies repre- 



capi- 
property 



^ected is owned in St. Paul, Ohlc^o, 
New York, Boston and St. Louis. 

Tlie Posten. 

The Swedish Publishing Jt Printing 
company has been organized with a cap- 
ital stock of $10,000. It will publish The 
Duluth Weekly Poeten. The company 
today bought for «2200 The Fadernes- 
landet, and w^ill take possession Feb 5 
The paper will be greatly strengthened 
and improved The otlicers are: Presi- 
x®?Hi^,,^- Swanstrom: vice-president, 
>il8Hall;8ecretarj-, Liouis Rietz; treas- 
urer, Dr. J. J. Eklund. These together 
with C. W. Renard, Gust Bergquist and 
Ferdinand L. Engberg are directors, 



Notice the new bargains offtred 
M. Root &. Co.'b ad. 



I am offering a few good bargains in 
residence lots near where the Hourinc 

mills are to be built ^ J. A. Bo<x:s, , ..„„.. „, 

^J FarguBon Building, of people to the streets. 



The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's olfice. Hotel St. Louis: 12 m. 
31 above; 3 p. m.,33 above; 6 p. m., 31 ' 
above; 10 p. m., 28^ above; 7 a. m.. 16^ 
above; 9 a. m., 14 above; 12 m., 15 
above. Ma.\imum, :i3 above. Mini- 
mum, 14 alxive. Daily range, 19\ 

The Industrial Age and Scandinav 
will each issue as a daily for aijout a 
week during the campaign. Both are 
in the interests of Davis. 

At the suburb of Lakeside the side- 
walks are kept clear of snow and ice by 
the street commissioner and a gang of 
men. The plan could be adopted with 
profit in Duluth. It could be done at 
much less cost in this way than if each 
were requireil to clean snow away from 
their own premises. 

Three drunks were regularly commit- 
ted at the police court this morning for 
the penal term of seven days each. 

The deputy clerk of the municipal 
court found a handsome scarf pin in the 
police court Saturday, and will return it 
to the owner upon verification of the ar- 
ticle. 

Treasurer Miller of Temple Opera was 
examined at the court house this morn- 
ing in connection with the Boston Ideals 
garnishee matter. He testified that the 
money taken in from the sale of tickets 
belonged solely to Dr. Haycock, the 
manager of the theater, and that Mana- 
ger Foster of the Ideals had no interest 
whatever in the receipts. 

The advance sale for "Zig-Zag" has 
been large, and the attraction will ap- 
pear before a crowded house. 
The warm weather has brought crowds 



The Citizen Factory. 

Newly made voters up to 3 o'clock to- 
day mcluded 9 xXorwegians, 21 Swedes, 3 
Poles < tins, 4 Canadians, 1 each, Eng- 
land, Ireland and Scotland. 

The county auditor and treasurer are 
hard at work on the financial statement 
of St. Louie county for 1889. The de- 
tails will be ready for publication 
about ten days. 



Samuel C. Ma.rwell, Duluth 
•;'."',""'''"'■''• l^uluth. Minn. 
« lUiam S. Albertson, Duluth 
John K. Shaw, Duluth. .Minn 
Samuel T Harrison, Duluth, Minn 
Kobert Lromble, Duluth, .Minn 

yJV''ii"u*^''?'- V""''"''^"' liuluth, Minn. 
Zadok H . Austin, Duluth, Minn. 

ARTICLE VU. 

v^Zau^Y^^*^^^ V' ?•>'' "ssot'iation shall be 
vested in a Board of elg^ it Dii-eetors and tie 
lowing officers u, bi> chosen by th J said oi 
of directors fnun amou^ themselves: Pn 



COAL 



CfiOSS CfiEEK LEHIGH, 

FREE BURNIIIG, 

AilHRAClIE i eilUMINOUS. 



in 



Mr. P. A. Burdick, the temperance 
lecturer, received a telegram that his 
family were in better health; he will 
therefore remain here a while longer. 

Register Tomorrow. 



Mgemeut and invesiment of its funds If t 

deem it advisable they may, by resolution 

-lum; two dollars lo lA. paid as the flrst i° s'l 

:^" K^!; Vf.^'l'*"."''' o< «o^" ^.ul-scilli^d for 



Acres. 
Two acres in southeast corner swU 

S©C. l»>-t>U-l*±. 

Five acres, sec. 13-50-14. 
SW>4 of nw34, sec. 7 50-13. 

E. W. Markell. 

If you want to build in Endion con- 
sult J. M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptlv 



Notice. 

I desire hereby te announce that 1 
accepted the nomination for mayor last 
Thursday night. M. J. Davis. 

Notice of Dissolution. 

.'^he firm of Joerns & King, consisting 
of W. (r. Joerns and H. M. King, hereto 
fore conducting a real estate, insurance 
and loan business at No. 30 Board of 
Irade, has been dissolved by mutual 
consent. 

W. G. .Ljerns will continue the real 
estate and loan business of the old firm 
at the former place of business, as above 
stated, under the name of W. G. Joerns 
«t Go. 

H. M. King will continue the insur- 
ance business of the old firm at his of 
hce in the Palladio building. 

W. G. .JOEKN.S. 

H. M. King. 

Register Tomorrow. 



fol 
board 

djyit. vlce:pri>si.h;nr";:^"?^.t;,^rt^:i^ure;!''^d 
attorney. The terms of offii^ of such ^ffl,^,^ 
shall be equal to their terms as direc ors Th^ 
cSs^'thJ.'^fllT'/V""'^ -^'^-^l^^^l intrthr^.e 

t le Hi^w.h.'*: '"'V? r^""^- '"'« t'^'-'" of office of 
the first elites shall lie one year; the second 
two years; and the third, tliroo years ^^k,.,' 
the e.xp ration of the terms of any of the •^- 
rt^tors their successors shall be elected for a 
term of three years by the st.Kkholde^ at a 
.^fs .".ii","""'''."?r''"*- ^'''« »oan of Oi^et 
^e the .^«h^4"i" "T^''' '« t'-Husact and mfin- 
2£= ^."Pi'^ot said corporation; imnosinir 
reasoiiable flues, foes, ass<^ssmems an f du^ 
upon Its members; n^KUlatinK the ^ubscriS? 
tiou, issue, and transfer of stock and thV ma^- 
!1?::L'.'SV^.'^?'^ inyesunent of its fuiX. If ?hl>y 

re- 
nstall- 

taken iti iij^ii^^^-;:-^^^uii:^'^^^^^ 

advisable they may in similar manner re.riir.^ 
twodollars on each share to be paid as the Ur^ 
installment for any subse,,uent series. The 

First Class— 

Zadok H. Austin, 

Hobert Cromble. 
Second Class- 
Simon Chirk, 

William S. Alberlscm, 

Samuel C. Maxwell. 
Third Cla.ss- 

Alexander M. Morrisom, 

Samuel T. Harrisom, 

John K. Shaw. 

fl.^'ril "^\'i' *'*>'''■ suf-cossors shall have onall- 
fled the foilowiiiK named persons shall be the 
; officers of this asso<iatlon: 
I Presldenl, John K, Shaw 

yice-^president, Samuel C. MajtweU. 

Secretary. Zadok H. AusUn. '"'^""• 

Ireasurer, Kobert Crombie 

Attorney. Samuel T. Harrison. 

Oiher nieetlnjrs of the stockholders may be 



Dry Maple, 

Hard Mixed, 

.Slal>s, 

Kd|;in{p<. 




CONNELLSyiLLE 
y GAS HOUSE. 



mm nmm delivebed 

TO ANY PART OF THE OTY 



Office: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Superior St. 



YARD: 

Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Garfield Avenue 
Rices Point. 



factories, build- 
of way, depot (frounds. 
appurtenances necessary or con- 
venient fjr the eiiuipmcut, nianag\-ment and 
oi>eration of such railway, which sliall com- 
mence at i point within thelimitsof the vill- 
age of Wast Duluth, in the county of Saint 
Louis and State of Minnesota, and run In a 
jrc-neral narih westerly direction to a point lu 
the uortteust quarter of section eleven (111 
township torty-uine (4!h north of raiijfe flfteen 
116) west of the fourth (4th) principal meridian 
111 said ounty of Saint Louis and State of 
Mlntiesotii . The principal plac«^of transacting 
business if the corporation shall be at Duluth 
in the Co inly of Saint Louis in the state of 
Mluuesota. 

Signed, 
_ Jacob K. Mi-ers. 

Be.njamin F. MvERS, President. 

Secretary. 

Subscribsd and sworn to before me this ICth 
day of Jar uary, ISKI. 

S. M. Chandlek, 
fKT * , , ,, Notary Public, 

[Notarial e oal] St . Louis County, Minn. 




REPORT OF THE CONDITION 



OF THK 



MANOFACTUREeS BANK 



STATE OB MINNESOTA, ( 
DKPAKTMIINT OF STATE, f 

I hereby uertify that the within instrument 
was tiled fir record in this olHce on the ITth 
day of Jan lary. A. D. 1«K). at 11 o'clock a. m., 
and was duly recorded in Book Y of incorpora- 
tion on pajie 217. 

H. Mattson, 

Secretary of State. 



. — part 

■ ■ " paid save tlie Interest on 

said moryrage lo the elirhth flay ot July it<«>° 
Now, thcrelore. notice is herC^by riven that 
by virtue of saldiwwerof sale and pursuant 
to the statute in sucli c-se made and provided 
the siild mort»faKe will be foreclosoa aud the 
premises described in aud covertnl by the s«ld 
mortt^a^., viz : The tracts or parcels of land 
lying and being in the county of St. Louis and 
state ot Minnesota, to-wit: Lots two hundred 
aud sixty-nine latiS) and two hundred and 
seventy-one (2TD on Lake avenue in Upper 
Du uth, acc-ordiug to the plat of said town of 
Duluth, recorded in the office of thereristerof 
deeds in said St. Louis county, with the 
hereditaments and appurtenances, will be sold 
at public auction lo the higliest bidder for 
ca-sh to pay tlie said debt and interest and fifty 
dollars attorney s fees, stipulated in by said 
mong ge in case of forecU>sure, and the dis- 
bursements allowed by law, which sale will bo 
made by the sheriff of said St. Lonis county 
at the front door of the county court house In 
the city of Duluth, ia the cdijntv and state 
aforesaid, on the 15th dav of March, imi at 
ten o clock of the forenoon of thai day. subject 
to redemption at any time within one year 
from the daj of sale, as provided by law 
Dated at Duluth, January a>th, 1«59. 

John D. Howard, 
W.M. B. PHELPS, Mort«a««e. 

Attorney. 
Jan. 27, Feb. 3, 10, 17, 24. 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



Register Tomorrow. 



J. A. Boggs offers profitable invest- 
ments m Superior. This property will 
double ■- - - ■■ 



Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accuj-ate and prompt attention at 
Ihe Herald Job Rooms. 

Mendennall & Hoopee have a quantity 
of money which they can loan iu small 
amounts at G per cent Call and 
them before making your loan. 



may be pro- 
In witness whore<ir we have hereunto set our 
v! D.! WW."*""'" """• fl'^-^^^ot" aay of JaTuSry 
In pre.sirhce of 

G. F. Macke.nzik, witness. 
A. 1-. Wii.so.N. witness. 

S.A.MI-E1. C. .>fA.\WKI.L 

Simon Clakk 
W1LI.IA.M K. Albbrtson 
JoHN K. Shaw 
Samuel T. Makiu.so.v 
ROBKHT Crombie 
A. M. M0RI8ON 
Zadok H. .Vustin 



OF WEST DULUTH, 

West Duluth, Mian., at the Close 

of Business, Jan. 18, 

1890. 



OFFICJ; OF REGISTER OF DEEDS. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, I 
County c f St. Louis, f ^• 

I hereby certify that the within amended 
article wa.s flled in this office for record on tlie 
^h day of January, A. D. 1890, at 4 o'clock p 
m.,and wai duly recorded In Book E of Mis- 
cellaneous, imge 144. 

Amos Shephard, 

Heglster of Deeds. 
^ By J. A. SwANso.N, 

Deputy. 



Northern Pacific Sliort l.lii«. 



DULITTH TO BUPERIOB. 



Leave 
Duluth 



Leave 
W. Sup'r 



KE.SOURCES. 



Seal.l 

Seal. 
^Scal.'' 

Seal. 

Seal. 
,Seal ' 

Seal.' 
^Soal.'' 



see 



A fine large assorted 
tines will be found at 
52(> West Superior street, 
your choice. 



stock of valen- 

W. M. Buckley, 

Call and take 



Highest of aU in Leavening Power^U. S. Gov't Report, Aug. xy, xSSj, 



Mendenhall & Hbopee have a large 
list of Oneota property which they can 
sell at a barg^iin. Call and see them be- 
fore making your purchase. 




Baking 
Pomier 



Notice the new bargains offered 
M. Root &. Co.'s ad. 



in J. 



ST.VTE OF MINNESOTA 1 
CouNTV OF St. Louis (^^ 




Loans and dlsoouuts «64 aiT m 

Overdrafts 59 •« 

Furniture and fixtures "" 1 4xi iw 

Current Expenses 4 2*340 ''« 

Checks and cash Items .:.'.... 'lOO 00 

Rkserve— 

Due from other banks... $10,394 39 

Cash on hand 3,086 18 

13,480 57 

*ttl,401 flO 
liabilitibs. 

Capital stock lesiwiiw 

Undivided profit? ; aSS 70 

I)emai.,| c-ertiflcatee .iW^ii) ' 

il^i^ ,<-T>-t flc;atc8 . 3,000 18 

Individual deposits subject 
to chock 48,643 so 

Cashier's checks ' »52,(W0 54 

Collection account '...'.!!'..!. 



39 60 
316 (to 



«8L401 90 



new 
113 



Dancing and Deportment. 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll 
names for his second term at No, 

West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' nnd gents' 

Wedneedays^t 8 p. m. ' 

Register Tomorrow. 



Register Tomorrow. 



ABSOUUTEUr PURE 



SU Hani & Dnlnth .Short Mue. 

Duluth to West 

iMihith to West 
/Superior. ..... 'S 40 4 46 •+6 30 •« 60 •+IO 00 pm 

>Vesl M/perior '^ 

to Duluth. t^ 10 •7 56 aonio 16 Ml 18 am 

V%est Superior - " ■ ^ 

to Duluth '2 0(1 t340 3 50 '5 46 •tO 10 •» 10 pm 

•Dally +West Duluth onlv. '^ 

.Leave Duluth dally for Spirit Lake-9:0U am 

10:06am and pm. ' 



o be the persons whoexVc uV. "Vhr^/or^K UiK 
Instrumen an.l each scknowle.ljnvl th al*^ I i? 

^^^f,} X, , ..^•".""'"■^ •■" Mackenzie, 
Notary Public, Si. Louis County. Minn. 

OFFICE OF REGISTER OF DEKD.S. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. I 
C<ivsrr OF St. Locis. ( ^• 

Jj!'!'^1u. certify that thewrhin articles were 
nicl In this offlcefor record on the 17th day of 
January, A. D. 1S90, at x odock a. m., and 

was duly ivoordoil in Hook E of Miscellaneous 
pag'c Hu. 

Amos Shephard, 
Hculsterof IK-eds. 

Hy J. A. SWANSON, 

Deputy. 



STATE OF -MINNESOTA, ) 
County or St. Louis. ( ** 
V Harvey P. Smith, cashier of the 



named bank, do solemuly swear that the above 
best " 



statement Is true to the 
and bt'llef. 



above- 
above 
of my knowlodge 



THE fORTHWESTtfiN LINE, 

C, ST. P., M. &0. RY. 

Take this line between St. Paul, Min- 
neapolis aid Chicago, Duluth, Wash- 
burn, Ashlind and all jKiints on Lake 
Superior, and to Sioux City, Omaha, 
Kansas City, Denver, Spokane Falls, 
Portland, end all jxiints west. 

"The Noith western Line," C, St. P., 
M. & O. R'/, will also take you to the 
wheat fields of Dakota and Minnesota, 
the corn fields of Iowa and Nebraska, to 
the Black JIills and the wonderful oil 
and coal be iring districts of Wyoming. 

No line is so well equipped for ite pas- 
senger busi less, or gives more attention 
tothecomfjrt and convenience of pas- 
sengers thai "The Northwestern Line," 
nor does an/ other line make as good and 
reliable connections East, North and 
Southwest. With tourists, land-seekers 
or imigranti, in fact with all the travel- 
ing public, "The Northwestern Line" 
stands first. 

For map 1 older showing the line and 
connections, call at 159 East Third street 
St. Paul, :«1 Hotel St. Louis block, Du- 
luth, U Nicollet House, Minneapolis, or 

Agt,bt.Paiil,orG. M. SMITH, Gen'l 
Agt, Duluth. 



Except Sunday. . 
Except Sunday. . 
Except Sunday. . 

Dally 

Daily 

Except Sunday.. 

Daily 

Daily 

Dally 

Daily 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Daily ■: . 

Dailv ' 

Daily 

Except Sunday... 



ti30 am 

7 35 am 

8 56 am 

10 00 am 

11 35 am 
llOpm 
816 pm 

3 35 pm 
330 pm 

4 00 pm 

4 36 pm 

5 40 pm 
«46pm 
715 pm 
9 25 pm 

U 10 pm 



6 45 am 

7 65 am 
» 10 am 

10 16 am 

11 60 am 
128 pm 

2 30 pm 

3 40 pm 

3 46 pm 

4 16 pm 
4&0pm 

6 66 pm 

7 00 pm 
7 30 pm 
9 46 pm 

U27pm 



Arrive 
Superior 



62 am 
802 am 
917 am 

10 22 am 

11 67 am 
136 pm 
2 37 pm 
347 pm 

4 35 pm 

4 67 pm 

6 02 pm 

7 07 pm 



116.8 pm 



scrpBaiOR to DuttrrH. 



Leave ; Leave 
Superior W. Sup'r 



Daily 

Except Sunday.. 
Daily 

Except Sunday.. 
Except Sunday.. 

Daily ■'.. 

Daily 

Dally :.; 

Except Sunday. .. 

Dally 

Dally ;.' 

Dally 

Daily '..'.' 

Except Sunday. . 
Daily 

Except Sunday! " 



. 09 amj 

"i'ioam 

9 25 am 

10 45 am I 

11 U5 am 

12 3&pm 
1 46 pm 
SSUpm 
405 pm 
6 06 pm 

010 pm 
7a0pm 

1146 pm 



6 46 am 
707 am 
740 am 
8 17 am 
938 am 

10 66 am 
1116 am 
12 42ym 

I 68 pm 
3 00 pm 
4 16 pm 
6 12 pm 
6 10 pm 
6 17 pm 
730 pm' 

11 52 pml 



Arriv« 
Duluth 



706 am 
723 am 
766 am 
836 am 
948 am 
11 10 am 
11.30 am 
100 pm 

3 07 pm 
3I6pm 

4 30 pm 

5 30 pm 

6 25 pm 

6 36 pm 

7 46pik. 
1210 am 



St. Pant A Dolath Railroad. 



Attest: 



Hakvky p. Smith, 

Cashier. 



J. D. UovD. 

W. H. H. Stoweli,. 



Sworn to and subscribed before me tills 33d 
day of January, 1890. 



N..rt]iem Pacific Railroad. 



Dining: Cars on Paciflc 
BxpreiA TraliiB. 



Leave Arrive 
Duluth Duluth 
Dally. 1 Dally ' 



leave Duluth... 
Arrive St. Paul.. 
Ar Mlnnea(>oli8.. 

At Stillwater 

Ar Milwaukee 

Ar Chicago 

ArSt. Louis 

Ar Kansas Citv. .. 



S 
0.0 a.o 

'. OD ^ 



8 00 am 
2 30 pm 

2 66 pm 

3 30 pm 

4 15 am 
7 CO am 

5 05 pm 
446pm I 



B 



210 pm 
666 pm 
7 20 pm 
7 05 pm 
6 45 am 
930 am 
6 06 pm 
4 46 pm 



♦Except 8unday-to other pointa daUx. 



1000 pm 
«66am 
715 am 

7 00 am 
t7 06 pm 

tnoopm 
am 

8 46 am 



LSeal] 



Chas. W. Hoyt. 

Notary Public, 
Minn. 



.^30 p m; retumin^ at 1 




B U 5 1 N E 5 S 



ST.\TE OF MINNESOTA, ( 

Dei'aht.mk.nt OF State. 1 

I beivtiy iHJrtity that the within instrument 
wus HUM forrccMnl in this office on the 34th 
day of January K. D, ISHo. at » o'clock a 
in., and was duly nci>nl«}d In liook Y of incor- 
porations on paj|fe3:t5. 

H. Mattson, j noon at Parsons' Business College" sec 




3.30 pm{«.26 pm 



7.16 pm 



7.65 am 

..4< .... 



For Ladies. Special classes every after- 
noon At. 'Paro/^na' 'P,ia;*..v..» /~1..11 



Secretary of State. ' nd floor. 



P^lflc express (limited) for 

Fargo, Hehna, Butte, Ta- 

wma. Seattio and Portland, 

Grand Forks Grafton. Win' 

nipe» 

Dakota Express, for't'erfriis 

talis, Walpeton, '"arffo, 

Jamestown a ad Intermediate 

points 

Chici^foBxpreis, for' Ashland, 

Milwaukee, 1 ;hlcaKO and all .... 

Wisconsin Central and Mil- .. . 

waukee, Lako Shore & West- .. . 

em points UOQ pm 10.3Qaip 

All trains dnll.v. Throup-h sleeper fro» 
Duluth on DaJiotu express ieavlns- at 7-16 c 
Free Colonist Sleepers ara run on Pacifii 

jNo. c. I.;™™.;,., 

Ticket Agent, Colon Depot. 



Leave Duluth 

Leave West Sup<Srior. 

Leave Su perior 

-Arrive Stillwater 

Arrive St. Paul.. .. 
Arrive M i n neapol la . 



Bz Sunday 

10 46 am 
11 10 am 

11 90 am 
6 32 pm 
SOOpm 
6«0pm 



Dally. 

10 00 pm 
1026 pm 
lOSfipm 
700 am 
6B6;aBi 
786 am 



m 



Joeper 

Express leavlnir Duluth at 3:;J0p _ 

ROBINSON. 



Leave Duluth. 

Leave West Superior 

Leave Superior. . . 

^rive Chi ppe wa Fails. 

Arrive Eau Claire. 

Arrive Madison 

Arrive Milwaukee. 

Arrive Chic ago. . . " • 

F.om8t.PaulandM°igljX'Vwam»i2S2 



CUoaco lo- 
cal, daily 

10 46 am 

11 10 am 
11 90 am 

6 10 pm 

6 60 pm 
1 3»am 

7 40 am 
7 00 am 



WHEREAS ON THE 8th DA V OF JANC- 
.... ary, 18«., Luella P. Blis« and Aaj^n S 

H.'wa?d"u':efr"X"r^ ''"'^ deli ver^^lo'^jX" D.' 
iiowara their certain mortjraires l)earino-dii.f« 

Of Xu^r''\ ?°<^ «'*^"i '^"'^ rS[ed^rh*offl^ 

LousaSifstHL'^^f'^S''''*'' "^"^ county of sT 
ivouisana state of Minnesota in book i!] of 

jTnuarfl;^.?", ^^^ "'"• «°" »"" 10th da'y ?J 
Januarj, ltH.h. j.-.^o p ^ ^j,ich uiortjmirp w«fi 

.M la"rs'''an,l "1',^; ^"^^^ "*-«* "^ X'^'^slnd 
tlontnr^hlJ""''''''' ' "^-oordinR to the cndi- 
low" • Ono ?^ promissory notes payable as foi; 
m^ 0«??S two thousand dollars, payable in 

douir? o..v«'m "'•"' ^'**''= '"^'^ *"'■ tWo tiiousand 
<iOllar^, pai able in two years from 'said datP 

iiiMi J ears from said date, with interest on 
said sums at the rate of s pcT cent per annum 

a,»ih t^^"*"* P-'^vided and stipulated in 
umd, o.^h« ?"'"*''»fe that if default should be 
uiauc in the i)aj mem of said sum ot monev or 

h^nTam"or^';? ^'^" '''^-^"^ ^^ the time and ?n 
ine manner in said morlifage specified for the 
pa> nient thereof, the s^d iortg^J? wal 
authorized and empowere<l to seller mo^ 
K|'Ked premises hereinafterdescribod at pubUc 
auction, and convey th same to the purcK? 
in Iw simple, ajrreeably to the statute i^s^Jch 
case; made aud pmvidi^, and out of the mo^M 
arising- from such sale U) retain the pruXS 
an. interest then due on the said £oSe 
ad notes, together with all costs and cha^^ 
uV^i^V*"-' -ym of Mlty dollars asattornSy^ 
J-^^n^'i^.V. 1'"-* "^crpias, if any, to the mort- 
or as^^usf and*'"^' **^''**"*' administrators 

Whereas, default was made in the pavment 
of the sum 01 two thou.'saud dollars priii "ipal 
and interest on six thousand dollars at the rat^ 

'i'.^K.' VS.Ju'*'1!-P:?''k''°""« f«>°» the hth day 

01 July. IN<». which became due and payable 
on the «h day of January. ISHU, amount"^ to 
the sum of two thousand two hundred and 
forty-scveu 6l-:0u dollar* ,*i'47.«l), widch is 
claimed to be due and payable on said mort- 
ira^e at the date of this nouoe, and no acii"n 

been 
said 



i ■ 



^- 




/ 

/' 



f 



(. 



— h 





■ 



■B 



ammmm-aim 



rgrr 



DULUTH EVENING HERAL13: 




Minn. H'storcal Socic^ 



A large list of Endion division 
lots cheap. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 W. Superior Street. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILDINQ. 



1 



DULUTH. MINN.. TUESDJiY. JANUABY 28, 1890. 



PBIciTTHBEE CENTS. 



& WAISOi 



GLASS BLOCK STORE. 



116, 118 and I 20 West Superior St., 



DULUTH, MINN. 



1 

1 




h 




\ 




J'! 





I THE GOOD WORK GOES NOBLY ON | 



OTJie a-isE.a.a? 



!>■! ■ 



CLEARANCE SALE 



Has proved a Rigantic succees. Thousands of people have been made happy 
bv the Grand Bargains we have given them in the past two weeks. ONLY FIVE 
MORE DAYS, and our Stocktaking sale will be-at an end. We are determined to 
make it. 



Five Days of Terrible Slaughter, 



In order to swell our sales and bring them up to the amount we were detenmined 
io reach when we began this year's business on the first day of last February. 
Bargains that are Bargains,' and good for FIVE DAYS if they hold out that long. 



LADIES, READ THIS! 



r- 


■i 



$ 1 .95 Self-Pouring Tea and Coffee Pots $ 1 .95 

fl.95 each, former price $5.50 and 86.50 each. We are determed not to take 
them into stock and will sacrifice them at 81.95 each to close them out. They are 
self-pouring and made of Silverette, and cost at wholesale $5.50 and IC.50. less 20 
per cent. You can't buy a common china one for that price. COME EARLY if 
you want one for ^1.95. 

$10— SEAL CAPS— $10. 



Any Gent's or Ladys' raal Seal Cap we have in the store, worth $12.50 to 16.50 
for $10 each. 



IScEACH 





1 5c EACH 




One lot of Children Merino Underwear, worth 30c, offered for half price, ]5c 
each. 

LADIES' SCARLET UNDERWEAR. 

7.5o for your pick of our Ladies' St-arlet Underwear, formerly sold for il.'2ii. 

SILVER HARE MUFFS. 

One lot of Silver Hare Muffs, well made and cheap at $1.50. Take them for 
75c each. 
Our 88, .?9 and -SIO genuine 

Beaver Muffs, Pick $5 

Our Lynx Back and Lynx Belly Muffs, worth $5.95 and $6.50. now $3. 

AN EYE-OPENER ! 

1 5c EACW. REGULAR l-RICE, 25c EACH. 

We have 200 dozen Bath Towels, size 44x23 inches. We have sold 100 dozen 
since this sale began at 25c. To create a little excitement we make them 15c each. 
Come and see this bargain. 

GENTS' - UNLAUNDRIED - SHIRTS. 

29c EACH, JUST THINK OF IT, ONLY 29c EACH. 

For Gents' Unlaundried Shirts, with Genuine Linen Bosom and Cuffs, worth 
and sold everywhere for .%c. Our price, 29c. 

Gents' Wool Underwear. 

Lot 1 — Former price $1.75 each, now 81. 

Lot 2— Former price $1.25 each, now 59c. 

Don't fail to ask to see these two Bargains. 




HELLO, THERE! 



^^ 



■K -K -I- T- ■ 



-^^^^^^, 



WHAT'S THE MATTER 



WIIH THE CANDY BUSINESS! 



A Grand Chance for Sweet Mouths. 

All our Candies must be closed out by Saturday night. Not an ounce will be 
left. DIGEST THE PRICES WE QUOTE: 

200 pounds Chocolate Creams, worth 40c per pound, for 15c per pound. 

150 pounds Marsh mallows, the Rising Sun Brand, beet in the market, 
sold by high-prioed dealers for 60c. Take them in one pound boxes while they 
last for 19c per pound. 



; \ 



LAST [DITION. 



L 




UP LABOR. 



Report to the Chamber of 

Connmerce on the Paint 

Question. 



Hope That Local Contractors 

Will Employ Duluth 

Men. 



Other Questions Discussed; 

the Sault and Hay 

Lake. 



Messrs. F. K. Long, A. Hirsch and C. 
O. Baldwin were admitted to member- 
ship at the Chamber of Commerce meet- 
ing this morning, and the executive 
committee reported a favorable outlook 
for large increases this year in the mem- 
bership of the organization. The recep- 
tion committee, to which the names of 
the president and secretary were added, 
was instructed to prepare a program for 
celebrating in an appropriate manner 
the opening of the new Chamber of Com- 
merce building. A banquet to the mem- 
bers will be given. 

The Philadelphia board of trade sent 
the Chamber a memorial on the Sault 
canal appropriation and the chamber of 
commerce of the state of New York 
called attention to the resolution re- 
cently adopted by it regarding the Chi- 
nese exclusion act. 

S. H. Moore of Pipestone asked the 
Chamber for more literature regarding 
Duluth, and also requested the Chamber 
to take action for a passenger service be- 
tween 80uthwe.stern Minnesota, south- 
eastern Dakota and Duluth via St. 
Cloud, over the Manitoba. The needs 
of these sections of country require di- 
rect passenger service to Duluth. 

Senator Davis sent some petitions to 
be circulated among the business men 
of this town, praying congress to i)ass 
the Hay lake and Sault appropriation 
bill. Congressman Comstock informed 
the Chamber that the Lind district 
court bill had been abandonded 
for the i>resent, owing to the 
opposition by democrats to the 
redivision of Minnesota into judicial dis- 
tricts. Mr. Comstock also said he would 
do all in his power to further the Sault 
improvement bill. The merchantile com 
mittee asked for more timis in which to 
make its report. 

The committee on American Labor 
Federation, Duluth council, reported 
that they had the matter of discrimina- 
tion against Duluth labor by con- 
tractors. The committee listened to 
the statements of both sides 
and gave the fullest liberto to each to 
state all. The facts seem to Ije as fol- 
lows: The painting in the Chamber of 
Commerce building, up to the latter part 
of November, was done under the imme- 
diate direction of Mr. Craig, the chief 
contractor. About the 3<->th of Novem- 
ber Mr. Craig, finding the offers of Du- 
luth contractors beyond his figures, let 
the painting contract to a Mr. Nelson of 
Minneapolis, and dismissed the painters 
in his employ, believing that he had no 
right to dictate to his sub-contractor in 
the matter of the employment of men. 
Mr. Nelson assumed his [contract, 
and brought with him his foreman from 
Minneapolis, in his permanent employ. 
He then secured the services of five Du- 
luth painters, one of whom he subse- 
quently discharged as incompetent. One 
of these men is still in his employ. The 
carpenter work, having fallen behind, 
the contractor was not able to give the 
painters full work, and they were em- 
ployetl on partial time. Subsequently 
Mr. Craig was anxious to hasten the 
painting. About this time Mr. Nelson 
went to Minneapolis. He learned that 
three of the men had left, and brought 
some of his permanent employes from 
there. The man who quit gave as their 
reason before the committee that they 
were employed only three days a week. 
Touching wages it seemed difficult to 
arrive at a correct conclusion. Accord- 
ing to statements, the amount paid hits 
been from 20 cents to 35 cents per hour. 
It is presumed that the latter was paid 
only in special cases. Mr. Nelson testi- 
fied that he paid his foreman 'iVi cents 
and his workmen 20ceDt8 per hour. This 
wage question seemed to be the cause of 
the dispute. The c"ontractor testified 
that be offered what he could afford, and 
only those who would work for that were 
accepte<l. These wages were paid with- 
out regard to locality. It was the testi 
mony of contractors and foremen that 
no question as to residence was raised. 

In this connection the committee sug 
gests that no contracts in this city for 
equal skill and fidelity men who are aid- 
ing to build up our own city should be 
preferred. The sub-contractor is now 
employing several from other cities, 
while man of our own in the same call- 
ing are unemployed. 

The committee believes mutual for- 
bearance and a spirit of concession will 
be sufficient to settle all questions and 
remedy all difficulties. At any rate it is 
far better that arbitation by disinter - 
rested citizens should be invoked in 
such disputes rather than recriminations, 
strikes and look-out*. 

TTie committee on National Education 
association entertainment reported that 
it hail asked that Duluth be placed on 
the excursion list of the organization. 
The matter of a contract with Se<-retarj 
W. F. Phelps for further services was 
laid over for further consideration. 



PANTON & WATSON. 



A PleaMunt Aflhir. 
There was a very pleasant gathering 
last night at Mrs. M. Sutherland's 
handsome residence, 313 West 
Second street. There were Judge 
Stearns and wife, Mr. and 
Mrs. G. A. Leland, Mr. and Mrs. F. H. 
Bainard, Mr. and Mrs. A. N. McGindley, 
Mr. and Mrs. H. B. Dow and Mr. J. T. 
Dow. Cards were the principal diversion 
till supper time. After doing full jus- 
tice to an elegant spread, the room was 
cleared for dancing, the old-fashioned 
quadrilles and the Virginia reel com- 

tjrising the list of dances. Mrs. Suther- 
and will leave Friday for a month's 
visit with friends in Southern Wiscon- 
sin. 



A special conclave of Duluth com- 
mandery, No. 18, Knights Templar, will 
be held this evening at their asylum, 
Hayes block, East Superior street, for 
the purpose of conferring the Temple 
degree. By order, 

A. LeRicheix, 
Recorder. 



A B AD O NE. 

Allowed Another Man to go Insane for 
Hl8 Own Crime. 

CoLDWATEK, Mich., Jan. 28. — Today 
an officer here received a dispatch from 
Youngstown, Ohio, to arrest Wm. W. 
Nivison and to hold him until requisition 
papers could be procured. The officer 
went to Nivison 's house and told what 
his business was. Nivison requested 
that he be permitted to go up stairs for 
his overcoat. He was allowed to do so, 
and before Miller suspected anything the 
prisoner had shot himself. Before he 
could fire the second time, he was dis- 
armed. The wound is not believed to 
be fatal. 

Last fall Nivison set fire to and burned 
his residence in Algansee township, but 
was discharged on the ground that a 
person had right to set fire to his own 
domicile. 

Nivison was formerly agent of the 
United States Express company at 
Youngstown. One night a package con- 
taining $7500 was stolen from the office. 
Detectives were employed and the cashier 
of the office was accused. The accusa- 
tion brought against him made him in- 
sane and is now in an Ohio insane asylum. 
Nivison recently made confession of the 
whole affair. The grand jury indicted 
him Saturday. 



MAKING NEW CITIZENS. 



Two Thousand Register**' *t 

Various Precincts for 

Voting. 



A Good Many Are Fresh Citi- 
zens, But More Are 
Old Ones. 



POLISH CATH OLICS. 

A Uelegatlou Goen From itiyiiilo to Rome 
to Knter a Protest. 

Buffalo, Jan. '28. — .V special commit- 
tee of four members of the Polish 
Catholic church of East Buffalo left 
here today en route for Rome with the 
view of securing an audience of the 
Vatican and laying before the holy col- 
lege a statement of alleged grievances, 
which they hope to have redressed. 

For several years, up to a month or so 
ago. Rev. Father Klarviter was the 
pastor of the church of St. Adelbert, 
and as a result of his untiring energy a 
handsome church edifice, together with 
a school and parochial residence, were 
erec^iOd. Recently, however, Bishop 
Ryan, on the ground that the priest was 
deficient in business management, re- 
moved him to Dunkirk, .\gainst this 
the congregation protested in vain, and 
as a last resort the trustees closed the 
church. 

.\ mass meeting of the congregation 
was then held and the four delegates ap- 
points to go to Rome without delay. 
All the facts in the case, however, were 
placed by Bishop Ryan at the disposal 
of Archbishop Corrigan, just prior to 
the latter's departure for Rome last 
week, and it is hardly probable that the 
views of the delegation will prevail 
against those of the head of the church 
in the state. 



A RELIC OF THE PAST. 



Discovery of an Old Frenoh I^ock at the 
Sault. 

Ottawa, Jan. 28.— The report of the 
discovery at Sault Ste. Marie recently, 
on the Canadian side, of the remains of 
an old canal lock built in 1707 has been 
received. The lock was located from 
old maps and papers. The Canadian 
engineering authorities did the excavat 
ing. The lock was fouml intact, ff)rty 
feet long and eight feet nine inches wide, 
and so well preserved that the report 
said it could easily be used for the pur- 
pose for which it was built, the transfer 
of the early French batteaux whose 
breadth of beam was about seven feet. 

It is believed the canal was also used 
as a race for a saw mill, which was 
burned by the American troops under 
Maj. Holmes in 1814. Maj. Holmes lost 
his life in the engagement. This saw- 
mill fire partially destroyed the banks of 
the canal and so filled it with debris that 
it was soon covered by a growth of vege- 
tation and was forgotten. 

ST. C LOUD NEWS. 

A L.arge Lamber Stable Burn«>d ; The Mlss- 
Issippi Klver Bridge. 

St. Cix)ud, Jan. 28. — [Special.]— Yes- 
terday morning one of Foley Bros, 
stables at their lumbt»r camp at Foley 
station, together with four ncules, three 
horses, four oxen and some feed burned 
to the ground. Loss, $2500. It is sup- 
ixweil the fire originated from a lantern 
that was left burning in the stable. 

Work on the new bridge across the 
Mississippi will commence in a few days. 
Foley Bros, of this place have the con- 
tract for $50,500 for the entire bridge. 
They have let the stone work to Coates, 
Freeman & Arnold. 

St Cloud's buildings and improve- 
ments for the year 188'J amount to $643, 
9003.5 which is not a bad showing. 

FOREP AUGH' S WILL 

To be Presented to Probate ; Young Adam's 
Ambition to Kival Barnum 

Philauelphia, Jan. 28. — The will of 
Adam Forepaugh will be presented for 
probate during the present week. It is 
said that the estate outside of the show 
itself will foot up fully $1,200,000. The 
bulk of this will go to Adam Forepaugh, 
Jr. 

The report that negotiiitionshavelieen 
on foot for some time looking toward 
the sale of the property to an Ei^glish 
syndicate is denied, and those in a posi- 
tion to know assert that it is young 
Adam's ambition to i>erpetuate the busi- 
ness as a memorial of his father, and to 
become a rival of Barnum himself. 



Judging from the number of new- 
names which were added to the poll lists 
in the various wards and precincts, there 
will be a heavy vote i>olled here on elec- 
tion day. 

In the Second and Third precincts of 
the Third ward, fully 500 new voters 
were registere<i before 2 o'clock. A very 
rarge percentage of these are Scan 
dinavians, and laboring men of various 
nationalities. The clerks were kept 
busy the whole day, not having time to 
breathe hardly, much less to eat. In 
the first precinct in the same ward at 
the time of going to press 
500 had registered and at 
least fifty were waiting their turn. 
In the First precinct of the Fourth ward 
there was a large number registered, and 
in the Second precinct at least twice as 
many were registered by 3 o'clock than 
were on the first and second days of 
registering. In the First ward Asa 
Dailey's office was crowded and another 
crowd waited its turn on the sidewalk. 
It was impossible to get in to learn how 
many had registered on account of the 
crush, but three or four hundred new 
names were added. The Fifth and Sixth 
wards had large additions to their poll 
lists, as far as could be ascertained be- 
tween 3(X) or 400. 

The offices will be kept open till 9 
o'clock tonight so as to give the fullest 
opportunities for every voter to register 
his name. All candidates are working 
to get ail that are qualified to put their 
names on the poll lists. 

Declaring Their Intentions. 

Clerk Pressnell with two assistants 
has put in the day, (and will be on dutj 
until 9 o'clock this evening) issuing first 
papers to a host of foreigners from many 
climes. In order to facilitate matters 
the men have been admitted in groups 
from one country at a time and they all 
take the oath together. There have been 
about 300 papers issuea today and the 
hallway and steps at 3:30 were still 
crowded with seekers after citizenship. 



BIRTHS AND 0EATHS. 



Report for the Year 1K8U From All St. 
Louis County. 

Between the dilatory conduct ot town- 
ship clerks, the failure of Dr. Hewitt to 
return the Hermantown records and the 
rather peculiar reports in the morning 
papers, one of which calls its publication 
a "morality" report, and the other falls 
into the belief that its item is a complete 
list, the average reader is a little bit at 
sea as to what the figures of births and 
deaths are. The Tower official has sent 
in no report as yet, and the Duluth 
health officer has got December mixed 
up somewhere. Some of the documents 
are almost illegible, by all odds the neat- 
est coming from Broitung where 80 per 
cent of the deaths are from mining acci- 
dents. 

There are 7 cases of twins among the 
births, 1 from Breitung and Oneota and 
5 from Duluth. There were 4 births 
from African parents in Duluth and 
there were 11 illegitimates ushered into 
the county during the year. The 
youngest father wns 18 and the youngest 
mother had not reached 15 years. There 
were some old people among the parents, 
too, and a father of CI and a mother of 
51 speak volumes for the healthfulness 
of our climate. Twenty-five p^er cent of 
the colored births were illegitimate and 
8<3 per cent of them were from foreign 
parents. As far' as reported there were 
714 births, .349 males and 365 females. 
There were no girls born in Duluth town- 
ship, and but one boy in Oneoata. There 
were 296 males and 313 females born in 
Duluth, and in Breitung, Rice Lake, 
Gnesen and Fond du Lac the males and 
females were a tie. 

The list of those who have died in- 
cludes 1 colored and .3'22 white people, of 
whom 240 were males and 117 females. 
Fond du Lac had no male deaths. 

The births were double the deaths, 
and the partial reix)rt is interesting 
reading, the first table being of births, 
and the second deaths: 

Males. Females. Total. 

Rroitung 41 41 82 

Duluth township.... 8 2 

Uiccljike 2 2 4 

(int'SOH 4 4 H 

Oiicota 12 3 

Fonddu Lao 3 :J tl 

Duluth 296 313 «09 



HEAV Y VISI TORS. 

Some Heavy Builders of Philadelphia are 
Surprised at Duluth. 

Duluth has been entertaining today a 
distinguished party of Philadelphia gen- 
tlemen, who ran up from St. Paul last 
night, where they are attending the 
convention of the National Builders as- 
sociation, "to take a look over the far- 
famed Zenith City," as they told a Her- 
ald reporter. 

The party is part of a Philadelph ta i 
delegation of thirty-six, and comprises I 
Charles G. Wetter, of Wetter & Payee 
the builders of the fiimous Bullitt b'' ''-^ 
ing; James U Doyle, presides . 
of the No* :i western Nati- ...' 
bank; Thomas . Doane, who b'lilt 
the Bromley carpet factory, 

the largest 'nctory building in th»' *•..■. Id; 
James P. ^ 'ock, a contractor o" I'h-'- ' 
adelphia'^ j:)20,000,000 city hall; Ht^r- 
Reeves, the juilder of the 8i,000,00i> ! 
Drexel office building; W. H. lioy aad 
James C. Taylor, two of the Quaker city's 
best-known builders and con tract "•«. 

These gentlemen weredelega.,- i he 
convention of ihe National Builders as- 
sociation, now holding in St. Paul. The 
convention began yesterday and will 
conclude with banquets at St. Paul and 
Minneapolis Thursday and Friday even- 
ings, after which more of the 
delegates may visit . Duluth. 

The gentlemen were driven over the 
boulevard and through the principal 
streets this morning by Messrs. Mer- 
chant, McNair, Long and Root. It is 
needless to say they were delighted with 
what they saw. 

"We were greatly surprised at the 
wonderful growth of this city and the 
many evidences of prosperity," said Mr. 
Doyle. "This is one of the best-built 
cities I have seen in the West, and I was 
surprised at the architecture and the 
beautiful and costly materials of which 
many of the buildings are made. The 
Spalding is one of the best built and 
planned houses I have ever been in, and 
the dining room is simply perfect." 

Said Mr. Wetter: "I have seen u'uch 
to please me in Duluth. The business 
streets show many striking examples of 
architecture, and the building materials 
are perfect. I think we must visit Du- 
luth in the summer." 

The party returned to St. Paul at 1:55. 

THE BLOCKADE. 



LEAVE THE 



Three Thousand Sailors Leave 

Powijerly and His 

Knights. 



T^, "wice an Iron Mill .Into 

the >\ssociation in the 

South. 



The .Santa Fe the Only Road Making: the 
run on Time. 

San Fka.nxi«'o, Jan 28. -Typical Cali- 
fornia weather prevails throughout the 
state, the sun shining brightly with clear 
skies, but the situation has not materially 
improved in the Sierra Nevada, where 
the Central Pacific is fighting to open its 
lines. The track is now clear from San 
Francisco to Reno, Nev., with the ex- 
ception of two miles near Cascade in the 
Sierras where the snow is drifted to a 
depth of thirty to fifty feet. 

A rotary snow-plow plunged into the 
drift and was completely lost in the 
snow. The rotary plow was released by 
200 shovelers and is again at work, but 
making slow headway. Between Truckee 
and Summit there is a stretch of road 
covered with ice which has to be cleared 
with pick and shovel. The Santa Fe 
road is the only line operating to the 
East running trains on time. 

TWO STEAMERS GO DOWN. 

Two Large Mississippi Klver Steamers arc 
Wrecked. 

Cincinnati, Jan. 28.- -Close upon the 
heels of the disaster to the steamer Ohio, 
of the Memphis & Cincinnati Packet 
company, which sank last night below 
the falls at Louisville, comes the news 
this morning of the total loss of the 
steamer DeSota. The news came here 
in a brief dispatch from Owensboro, Ky., 
to Capt. R. W. Wise, general manager of 
the line, written by Capt. M. M. Deem, 
who was in command. He gives no 
particulars, but simply says: "Steamer 
DeSoto burned at 2 a. m.,one mile below 
Owensboro; total loss; no lives lost." 

Tenuetutee Republicans. 

Nfw York, Jan. 28. — Hon. John M. 
Thurston of Nebraska, has been in the 
city for several days in the interest of 
the coming convention of the National 
Republican league at Nashville, Tenn. 
His special mission has been to confer 
with prominent republicans regarding 
league work generally as it relates to 
the Southern states. Gen. .\lger. ex- 
Senator Piatt and Hon. John F. Plum- 
mer have promised toattendthe conven- 
tion and Congressman McKinley will de- 
liver an address on protection. 



Railroads to Consolidate;. 

Nf.w York, Jan. 28. — Considerable in- 
terest attaches to the meeting here today 
of the directors of the Chicago & Eastern 
Illinois railroad, owing to the report cur- 
rent on Wall street that a consolidation 
with the Evansville & Terre Haute is on 
the tapis, and that President H. H. 
Porter, who has been in ill health for 
some time, will resign in favor of D. J. 
Mackay, the railroad magnate and pres- 
ent president of the Terre Haute road. 
The consolidation would give a direct 
route under one management from Chi- 
cago to Evansville, and greatly increase 
the importance of both roads. 

That Deadly Grip. 

Chicago, Jan. 28. — With the exception 
of a single day more deaths were re- 
ix)rted yesterday than for any other 
period of twenty-four hours during the 
present grip epidemic. The greatest 
number reported was on Jan. 20, when 
130 death certificates were returned. 
Yesterday 120 deaths were re«>rded. 
Over half of these were due to throat 
and lung diseases, ten of them due 
directly to grip and many others from 
complications resulting from it. Pneu- 
monia claimed twenty of the victims and 
bronchitis ten. 



I 349 

Rlct'Lake 1 

(ilU'St'U 1 

UreitUDg 18 

Oueota 1 

Fond du Lac 

Duluth 219 

240 



386 



714 




The Building & Loan Hearing. 

Ed. Ingalls received a communication 
from Public Examiner Kenyon, Satur- 
day afternoon, informing bim that the 
examination into the affairs of the Amer- 
ican Building & Loan association of Min- 
neapolis has beec again postponed until 
the Slst inst. On this date the Duluth 
committee will go down, attend the 
meeting and contribute its quota of evi- 
dence. 



1 


3 


8 


2B 


2 


3 


2 


2 


M 


323 



117 



366 



Lodge Constitution. 

Ionic lodge 186 A. F. & A. M., was con- 
stituted at Masonic hall last evening. 
The following officers were installed by 
grand lodge representatives: W. M., 
George N. LaVaque; S. W., Robert E. 
Denfeld; J. W., A. B. Wolvin; treasurer, 
Amos Shephard; secretary, S. L. Frazer; 
S. D., F. B. Lazier; J. D., John Cov- 
entry; S. S., W^ D. Underbill; J. S., J. J. 
Shotwell; Tyler, J. W. Miller. The lodge 
starts out with a good membership of 
representative masons and citizens. The 
second and fourth Mondays will be the 
days of meeting. 



District Court. 

The damage case of Charles Stark vs. 
Hubbard and Vincent, which has been 
on trial before Judge Stearns all day has 
gone to the jurj-, who are still out. 

The damage case of John Piering vs. 
the Northwestern Fuel (!ompany, is still 
on trial before Judge Ensign but will 
end this evening. 



If you want to build in Eadion con< 
suit J. M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



For Sale. 
Lot 93, East Fourth street, price, 
$4,000; $2,0(X3 down, balance on terms to 
suit the purchaser. Take advantage of 
this before it is too late. It is an im- 
mense bargain. 

Ericson & Stbom, 
211 Pastoret-Stenson building. 



All Sick and no Doctors. 

BCooMiNGTON, 111., Jan. 28. — Physi- 
cians of this city, who were called to 
Colfax yesterday, found that place in a 
deplorable condition. Dr. Wilson had 
just died from inttuenza, Dr. Langstaff 
was prostrated from the same disease 
and the only other doctor was called 
away by the sickness of relatives. Half 
the population of the town were sick 
from the grip and hundreds were need- 
ing medical attention both in the town 
and about it. 



Chloroformi'd by Those I'nknowu. 

Trknton, N. J., Jan. 28. — The coroner's 
jury in the Kuiffin murder case brought 
in a verdict this morning declaring that 
Mrs. Kniffin died from chloroform ad- 
ministered by persons as yet unknown, 
and further stating that the jury's labors 
have been hampered by the withholding 
of important evidence, which will come 
before the grand jury. 



Hurricanes In Deutschlaud. 

Bkrlin, Jan. 28. -Hurricanes con- 
tinue in northwest and central Germany, 
Much damage has been done to forests 
in those sections. A heavy snow storm 
prevails in the Erzgebirge mountains. 

New York's $15,000,000. 
Albany, N. Y.. Jan. 28. — In assembly 
today the W^orld's fair bill passed with- 
out debate or amendment. Only one 
negative vote was cast. 

Goo<i! The Brotherhood Wins. 

New\ork, Jan. 28.— Judge O'Brien 
has decided the suit of the New York 
Baseball club vs. John M. Ward, in favor 
of the Brotherhood. 



Railroad Notes. 



To Discuss the Shipyard. 

A meeting will be held at the Chamber 
of Commerce Thursday afternoon at 4 
o'olocik, and all citizens are invited to 
attend. The matter of discussion will 
be the McDougall shipyard. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate flniBhings at 
The Herald bindery. 



William Mellen, general manager of 
the Northern Pacific road, was in the 
city last evening for a short time. 

General Manager Plough, General 
Superintendent Copeland and Chief En- 
gineer Beeston, officials of the St. Paul 
& Duluth road, were in the city today on 
a tour of inspection and on Union depot 
matters. 

William Orr, general freight agent ot 
the Duluth, South Shore & Atlantic, 
was in the city today. 



A Bargain, 

We have for sale a lot 90x140 feet on 
East Third street. A fine double house 
IS on the lot, which is now^ renting at 
$100 per month, 40 feet of the property 
is unimproved. Will sell the whole 
thing for $6500; $3000 cash, balance on 
terms to suit. This is a big bargain for 
the purchaser. Catch on, quick. 

211 Pastoret-Stenson building. 



r 



OAOO, J-n . J. — Lake sailors, coin- 
ing Sea nens District Assembly 136, 
iL the Knights of Labor to the number 
of 3000 toe ay, in convention, deserted 
Mr. Powdeily's standard. Delegates are 
present fr)m Oswego, Buffalo, St. 
Cathrines, Cleveland, Detroit, Toledo, 
Milwaukee and Chicago. 

The grievance the sailors nave dates 
from last si miner, when they spent some 
3G00 in defending members of the order 
in cases ariiiing out of the labor troubles 
at Osweiro, N. Y. The men 
were releaBed, but when the district 
assembly atked general officers of the 
Knights for aid, no attention was paid 
their app«ai. When Mr. Powderly 
visited Chicago, a committee from the 
sailors visit jd him and he again promised 
to see abou reimbureement of the funds 
thus expended. That was the last heard 
of the matt>r until just before the At- 
lanta conveaion Mr. Powderly gave his 
word that something would be done in 
the convention. Nothing was done. 

Officials cf the district assembly be- 
came discoi raged, but again they made 
complaint tD the general master work- 
man. Mr. j'owderly did not even ac- 
knowledge t,he receipt of their letters. 
The convention will last several days. 
Delegates deny that any action will be 
taken in thd direction of severing con- 
nections wi ,h the Knights of Labor. 

AN (ORG ANIZED STRIKE 
Try to Forco an Iron Mill Into the Ainal- 



TWO MAY DIE. 

The Result of a Night Crossing's Aoeidemt 
at Chicago. 

Chicago, Jan. 28.— Another serious 
crossing accident which occurred in the 
northern part of the city, has just come 
to light. Mrs. De Mange and daughter, 
of Denver, and Mrs. Thomas P. Dohan 
of this city, started in a carriage from 
Mr. Dohan 's residence on Evanston ave 
nue to attend a party in Ravensw<x)d. 
John Murphy was driving. 

At the intersection of Sultzer road and 
the Chicago, Evanston & Lake Superior 
tracks, no fiagman is employed at night. 
Just as the i-arriage reached the track, 
an express dasheil around the curve and 
struck and shattered the vehicle. 
The driver was thrown fully 
twenty feet out into the 

roadway where he was picked up insen- 
sible. Mrs. Dohan was thrown against a 
row of limes, which grew along the track 
at that point and the other parties were 
also picked up at a considerable distance 
from the wrecked carriage. They were 
all insensible. 

The train was stopped, surgeons sum- 
moned from the United States M-'ine 
hospital and as soon as possible the un- 
fortunate people were reuioved to their 
homes. Since the accident Miss De- 
Mange who, with Murphy, appears to 
have received the most se'vere injuries, 
has been continuously unwnscious. 
Pneumonia complications have set in in 
Murphy's case and it is doubtful if he 
can recover. 



giimaled AsMtciation. 

BiRMiNGiAM, Ala., Jan. 28.— The em- 
ployes of the Birmingham rolling mill, 
1000 ifa number, went out on a strike 
yesterday, and the fight between men 
and the company promises to be a long 
one. A break in the amalgamated as- 
B<K'iation caused a strike. 

For five years this mill has Ijeen non- 
union; the anion's scale has been paid, 
but both ui ion and non-union men have | 
been emplo/ed. On Saturday night the 
men held a meeting and decided to or- 
ganize and 'orce the mill into the associ- 
ation when fi new scale is signed in July. 
At noon yef terday Manager Ward told 
the man th<iy could not organize for the 
purpose of lorcing the mill into the asso 
elation, and all day men quit last even- 
ing. The night men followed at the end 
of the nighl turn and over 1<J(X) men will 
be involved The weekly pay roll of the 
mill is about §26,000. 

400 Acres. 

All of e}4 and n% of nwj^, sec. 25-51- 
14. E. W^. Makkkll, 

Hotel St. Louis, ground Hoor. 



A Penny Wise Position. 

San Fkanciscx), Jan. "28. - The steamer 
Santa Rosa sailed yesterday for Portland 
without carrying the United States mail 
for the North, which had accumulated 
here in great volume owing to the • com- 
jilete railway blockade. It appt^ars that 
the steamer Columbia, which sailed for 
Portland last week, charged the United 
States government $1 per mail bag, but 
the government only offered fiftv cents 
per bag for mail to go by the Santa Rose, 
which the steamship ccjmpany refused. 
The company cites that the British gov- 
ernment pays this American line $40 per 
mail bag for carrying mails from this 
port to Victoria, and that when the home 
government cut the rate to fifty cents 
they declined. Two week's mail for the 
North remains here, and the situation 
from a commercial standpoint is serious. 

A Good l>eal of a Itoomer. 

Chicago, Jan. 28. -Don Luis Huller, 
who is known throughout this country 
as the Vanderbilt of Mexico, has made a 
proix)sition that certainly gladdens the 
hearts of the Chicago World's fair com- 
mittee. His proposition is to subscribe 
for 81.")0,000 worth of Chicago Woild's 
fair stock, and to raise in Mexico §1.500,- 
000 if given the necessary time. *" He is 
ready to sign his name for his individual 
stock as soon as any of the committee 
can get around to him with a subscrip- 
tion book, and he iias the necessary 2 
per cent where he can put his hands on 
it any moment. 

Calamity Weller. 

Indkpendenck, la., Jan. 28.— "Cal- 
amity" Weller, Nashua, well-known in 
connection with Iowa politics, has been 
seriously ill for several weeks, and is not 
expected to recover. 

The county auditor and treasurer are 
hard at work on the financial statement 
of St. Louis county for 1889. The de- 
tails will be ready for publication in 
about ten days. 



C. H. GRAVES & CO. 

ESTABLISHED 1869. 



REAL 



ESTATE. 



We have a large list o* choice Residence Lots, Acres, Business and Dock 
Property, cf which we have exclusive control. 

-:- LOANS. -:- 

We negotiate loans in any amount on improved city property, and for par- 
ties wishin,j; to build, at the lowest current rates of Interest. 

INSURANCE. 

Our list of companies comprises some of the oldest and largest in exist- 
ance. We give special attention to the careful writing of policies and prompt 
and fair settlement of all losses. 



ROOMS 2, 3 AND 4, BOARD OF TRADE BLOQ, DULUTH MINN. 

7- CHEAP - ACRES -i- 



NEXT TO LAND THAT WILL BE 



Platted This Spring, 




.LIAM C. SARGENT. 



REAL ESTATE. 

Special Bargains I Snaps. 

L 00 Acres in 4-50-14, 25 percent below the 
market. 
200 /Veres in 47- 1 6 at $5 per acre. 

Lands in 28-50- 1 5 at a great bargain. 
Sleveral pieces of acreage on the hill below 
the narket. 

2 Lots on Superior Street, Endion. 

63 Lots adjoining Lonaon, cheap. 

A feiv of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on <!asy terms. 

A iew desirable lots in Endion for sale without cash pay- 
ment, if improved. 

J. M. ROOT & CO., 

Room 9, Metropolitan Block- 



f 

i 



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t 



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1^* 

I 

I 



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DUIiUTH liVENLN^Q HEKAIiD: JANTJAKY 28, 1890. 



EV'E^rilS^G^ HERALD. 



ELIOT LORD. Publisher. 



PRICE. THREE OENTS-Sub»cclptlon Rates: 

Oailjr, hy mall, per year 1^*. '^"SS 

Dally, by mall; uer three months 2.00 

Dally, by mail, per one month 76 

m THB CITT. 

l>aUr, by carrier, por week 18 



Bntered at the poetofflce at Dulutb, Minn., as 
second-class mail matter. 



0rThc Washington office of The Herald Is 
at U^ New York aveniio, N. W., where the 
paper Is kept on tile and where The Herald 
correspondent wlU welcome visitors from the 
Northwest. 



THE PRACTICAL COURSE. 

— John K. Shaw was Dotnicated by ac- 
clamatioa Jtt the democratic convention 
yesterday, ond will run as the straight 
democratic candidate fur mayor. He is 
a business man of unclouded reputation, 
a representative democrat and a popular 
citizen, and will unquestionably make a 
strong run. The Herald will never for- 
get that it is a republican newspaper, 
but no member of any party in this city 
or countrj- shall ever be able to accuse 
it justly of misrepresentinjr facts inten- 
tionally or twisting the truth for politi- 
cal advantage. That is the line which 
The Herald proposes to pursue 
both on the ground of principle 
and political and business advantiige, 
for it liriMly believes that no enduring 
respect and success can be won by any 
other course. If that is being "entirely 
at sea" in its course, it is entirely willing 
to be tern pest- tossed on it. 

It is vain to pretend that the nomina- 
tions for aldermen by either party are 
wholly ideal, or even wholly satisfactory. 
In the world of practical affairs, such a 
concourse of nominations is rarely if 
ever seen. The best men for the places 
persistently refuse to run, or owing to 
the practical conditions facing them 
would fail of election if they did run. 
The inescusable apathy or neglect on 
the part of citizens who balk at their 
plain duty at the primaries and complain 
weakly of misrepresentation later, 
result inevitably in the frequent nomi- 
nation of unfit men or men less tit than 
might have been chosen. It is more- 
over fair to recognize that representative 
bodies of this kind are likely to repre 
sent the level and 



summer was a complete justification of 
the position of The Herald that the city 
was primarily responsible for damages 
arising from the diversion of a natural 
water-way by the city and the botch 
work connection with a clearly inade- 
quate and defective conduit, no matter 
whether any other party was secondarily 
responsible or not. Full damages were 
allowed without waiting the event of 
suits to sufferers, whose claims were 
certainly not more strongly founded on 
law than the oi'cupants of the Bunnell 
block, who were constrained to sue in 
order to recover. The Herald made no 
complaint of this discrimination, but the 
event of the Timlin suit has shown how 
baseless it was. The Herald takes pleas- 
ure in giving just credit for the able 
conduct of this suit by the attorneys for 
the plaintiff, Edson and Hanks. 



THEIR INNERMOST THOUGHTS. 



SEEN AND HEARD. 



•There was a time," said a drummer to me 
last night, "when America use<l to import all 
her pipes and canes. I say pipes and canes, 
for ifeuerally one llrm manufactures both. 
Thoy go well together, somehow. Germany 
and France sent us at one time a large portion 
of our supply. Kngland, too. made American 
money In this trade. Within late years, how- 
ever, we have not only held our own, but have 
driven the foreign product from the market. 
Today F. J. Kaldenburg & Co. of New York 
city have one of the largest cane and pipt^ 
manufacturing establishments In the world. 
So proHclent have Americans become In this 
manufacture, that this firm sent a pipe to the 
Paris ejc position, which took the tlrst medal. 
This prize pipe was of meerschaum, with a 
sctne representing Macbeth and the witches 
carved on the b.owl in solid flguro. Its value 
Is S13oU. We Import most of this pipe wood, 
that called briar being the best, as It absorbs 
the uicotiue like meerschaum. The wood comes 
in rough blocks, giving the outlines of the 
pipe In straight lines. Our amber for stems 
is aiso imported, and is ver> costly stuff. 
If * * 

Kaldenburg turns out every year a 
good percentage of all the canes used in 
the United States. They will vary in price 
from ten cents up to f llX), *150 and even higher. 
Some of the canes made this year are beauti- 
ful specimens of art. Cedar, willow, snake- 
wood, olive are the fancy woods this year. 
Only an artist can make a decent cane head. 
One beautiful cane we make this year leaves 
the wood In the rough, but cov- 
ers the knots with beaten silver. 
But the snake cane is the popular one this 
year. It Is of rough wood, unbarked, having 
below the handle a silver snake coiled per- 



Capt. Kidd, in charge of the ship yard: 
It's bad work building steel ships 
the cold weather we've had 
lately, a man can hardly 

touch iron and steel. But we are 
getting along well. The contractors 
down in Brooklyn are building a couple 
of boats for the Steel Bargfe company, 
they are 190 feet long each and about 
half the capacity of our big ones. I 
guess, though, notwithstanding tne size 
and weather, we'll build the two, 101 and 
105, quicker than they will build the two 
there. 

A newsboy: I took out thirty Heralds 
the other night, and it wasn't a very good 
night for news. But I sold the thirty 
before I had been in the street five min- 
utes and had to get another lot. 

R. S. Mungpr: They're having the 
same warm weather in the East they've 
had all winter. It is surprising. There 
is a good deal of sickness there, too. 

Ericson & St om: We regard The 
Herald the best advertising medium in 
Duluth, and we cheerfully give this as 
unsolicited. We sold seven lots last 
week, the result of our ads in The 
Herald. 



STATE AND NORTHWEST. 



A YEAR AQO. 



,,■ t 4.1. ■ '"'P* •* •>'*lf dozen times around the wood, 

composition of their gj, 



heads." 



constituents, and it is preposterous 
to expect therefore that all common 

councilmen will be sages and statesmen. 
The practical course to pursue in the 

coming election is obviously to make the 

best of the material furnished, and to 

give the city as good a council as can be 

elected. It is entirely proper for repub- 
licans to bear m mind that a working 

majority which can be relied upon to 

stand together in the council is no less 

essential to good, consistent and efficient 

legislation than the individual 

character of the members, and 

political divisions however jcauseless 

can rarely Ije wholly eradicated in deal- 
ing with city affairs. It behooves all 

loyal republican citizens, therefore, to 

see to it that an efficient working major- 
ity shall be secured, and in reviewing 

the lists presented The Herald has no 

hesitation in declaring that a republican 

majority can be secured which will rep- 
resent the city fully as well as any 

possible democratic majority. The citi- 
zens in the respective wards know the 

men who live among them and have 

been put up for their support far better, 

as a rule, than The Herald editor is able 

to judge of them, and can compare the 

respective fitness of the rival candidates 

for themselves. The Herald does not 

urge and will not ure the election o£, a 

really inferior republican over a better 

democrat in any ward, but it does call 

for careful investigation and comparison 
and the just remembranceof the rational 
demand for an effective and reliable 
working majority in legislation. 

One thing it hopes will be sunk deeper 
than plummet soundeth in the council 
that is to be. This is the 
mean balancing of end against 
end, and the idea that one section of the 
city will suffer by the legitimate ad- 
vancement of another. What Ijenetits a 
part cannot fail to Ijenefit the whole, and 
The Herald would see Duluth united as a°<J a 'op'c at which 
one man for the interest and growth of 
every part of Duluth and the city as a 
whole. 



Silver has entirely superceded gold in making 



The evening paper is the newspaper of 
the present, and its future success can 
hardly be predicted. The prejudice 
which at one time existed in favor of a 
morning newspaper has vanished and 
totlay many of the most successful jour- 
nals of the country are evening 
papers. The number is growing 
rapidly, much more bo than that 
of successful morning journals, and 
wherever the publishers of afternoon 
papers have thrown off the lazy idea 
that their sheets need not be a mere re- 
print of the morning blanket sheets, 
boiled in some particulars, extended to 
tiresome verbiage in others the after- 
noon paper is easily the leader. People 
won't wait till tomorrow for what they 
can get as well today. TViey want 
the news when it is news and 
not after their neighbors have 
read It and slept over it. 
These reflections are induced by a copy 
of The Washington Evening Star, one of 
the most successful newspapers in the 
country and one that has grown with 
almost phenomenal strides in the past 
three years. To come nearer home we 
have an illustration of the success of the 
afternoon newspaper in The Minneapolis 
Journal, whose circulation exceeds by 
nearly 10,000 copies daily, that of any- 
morning daily in the Twin cities. Its 
success, as well as that of The Star 
was attained by common sense, all round 
work and hustling. The Herald is mind- 
ing its own business and fast going 
ahead on that line as its circulation and 
advertising columns show. It will move 
from its present quarters on the Ist of 
the next month to the Hayes block on 
Superior street, and ita business office 
will be on the ground floor formerly oc- 
cupied by the State bank. All citizens 
and Tiaitors will be cordially welcomed. 



I have been looking over the list of guesses 
on Duluth population returned to The Herald, 
you see none of The Herald's employes are 
permitted to vote or I'd have an unfair ad- 
vantage, and I've Ijeen a good deal interested 
in the guesses and some (.leculiar features, I 
propose to take all readers of Seen and Heard 
into my confidence. There have been guesses 
ail the way from 25,ua)lotio,W)0, while a number 
have pinned their faith about 6ti,000. I will 
say this in reference to the two extreme num- 
bers, CTsUOO is a good deal lower than The 
Herald expected to recel ve,for no provision was 
originally made to take care of such a low figure 
In the same way 66,000 is not a little higher 
than any of us had looked for. I would advise 
those who have made either guess to try 
again. 

* * * 

But perhaps the most surprising feature of 
this whole guessing business, except the num- 
t-)er of answers coming in. is the fatt that this 
office h.-i8 received, on coupomt of the same 
date, three answers of exacUy the same figure, 
two of them came from Duluth and one from 
Cleveland. Ohio. There have been a number 
of guesses from Cleveland, several from Bos- 
ton, many from St. Paul and MinneapoUa, and 
strange to say the latter cities go higher, as an 
average, than do Duluthlans, and a few each 
from New Vork. Philadelphia, and half a dozen 
otlier Eastern cities. 

» * * 
If interest in the subject is any criterion to 
judge by, I should say the people of Duluth 
have declde<l temperance views. When P. A. 
Burdick lectured Sunday night at Temple 
Opera not less than 3U0O were cmwded into the 
building. All the standing room was occh- 
pied, and the stage was also fille<I, the speaker 
having no more room than he needed. The 
lecture began at T :30. By a quarter-past seven 
numbers of people being unable to gain admit- 
tance, were compelled to return home. Not 
only were the regular church congrega- 
tions present, but any number of people 
who never see the interior of a church. 
Whether it is that people like to have their 
ears tickled with strains of eloquence and 
flights of oratory, or from an earnest desire to 
hear the temperance question discussed, is an 
open question. It Is very evident that the 
subject is not at all devoid of interest and sen- 
sation. And a man that can make sensational 
and interesting a topic that is regarded dry 
and uninteresting, as temperance is by many, 
he has talked continu- 
ously to in part, at least, the same audience, 
is a genius indeed. Such a man is P. A. Bur- 
dick. 



.\ year ago Tuesday came the terrible 
afterblow of the Grand Opera house fire, 
when the walls fell and killed E. E. 
Chamberlain; C. F. Johnson's building 
burned, loss §.3000, insurance §'2000; stock 
of Albertson Jc Cham'oerlain, loss $10,- 
000, insurance §7000. 

Iron ore men begin to feel that 1889 
will be a great year on the Vermilion 
and other ranges. 

Fond du Lac pine fuss results in the 
arrest of the contractors who have been 
cutting timber. 

AMONG STATE EDITORS. 

Mankato Free Press: Duluth is bound 
to keep itself before the public. Real- 
izing that this time of year is an espec- 
ially dull one the Zenith cit had it ar- 
ranged that its municipal election should 
occur annually at or about Feb. 1. 
This forethought furnishes all the fun 
as well as noise necessary and the vari- 
ous newspapers of the town have begun 
their yearly scrimmage over the mayor- 
alty. 

Moorhead News: That was a most 
sarcastic and stinging rebuke which 
Land Commissioner Bookwalter admin- 
istered to the St. Paul chamber of com- 
merce the other day. Sioux City, he 
said, with her corn palace offers the 
farmer and home seeker clothing, bread, 
meat and business, and not a word about 
climate. St. Paul, with her ice palace 
and winter carnival, offers him climate, 
ice and Indians. He doesn't want them 
and so doesn't come. 

St. Cloud Times: There is a big 
scramble over the appointment to the 
Duluth receivership. "Charges" have 
been preferred against Mr. Maginnis be- 
cause charges were necessary in order to 
have him removed. It is not at all prob- 
able that there is anything in them, but 
they will ser^-e the purpose just the same. 
There are six applicants, and hundreds 
of letters are received by Mr. Comstock 
on the subject. Mr. Maginnis, is a 
brother of Senator-elect Maginnis, of 
Montana. 



A Norwegian woman about 47 years 
old committed suicide at Warren because 
of poverty. 

A. Jamison, a switchman of St. Paul, 
while out hunting yesterday, was fatally 
shot by the accidental discharge of his 
gun. At the time of the accident he was 
walking along Cedar Lake, near the 
Manitoba road. As he passed over a 
culvert the gun fell from his hands and 
both barrels were discharged. He was 
taken to his boarding house, where he 
died. 

The Minnesota Yacht club, of Minne- 
apolis, held a meeting for the purpose of 
making arrangements for the summer's 
yachting season. 

The second half year of the city schools 
of St. Paul opened today with an in- 
creased attendance in all departments. 
The services of two or three new teach- 
ers were required. 

Three boys, who were coasting at Han- 
cock, Mich., ran into a freight train. One 
was killed and another may die of his in- 
juries. 

The ceremonies attending the installa- 
tion of Bishop Shanley to the diocese of 
North Dakota yesterday morning were 
An a magnificent scale. A reception was 
tendered the new bishop, at which 
Father Constantine, of Minot, presented 
him with a purse of #1,000 from the cler- 
gy of the diocese. 

PROMINENT PEOPLE. 



PLACES. 



Laura E. Brown is the poet of the Ar- 
kansas Press association. She won the 
prize offered for the best description of 
the fair held at Hope. The description 
was written in verse. 

Rev. John Jasper of Richmond, Va., 
the colored clergjman who won fame by 
his sermon, "De Sun Do Move," has just 
preached the sermon for the VJ'tth time. 
He is growing old, but his fifty years of 
preaching do not seem to have lessened 
the vigor with which he presents his fa- 
vorite themes. 

Mrs. Livermore has just completed a 
serie.s of letters entitled "Hospital Rem- 
iniscences" for The Christian Advocate. 

Dr. Hale preached his first sermon 
when he was 20 years old. He was a 
worthy namesake of Edward Everett, 
who was professor of Greek at Harvard 
when he was '21 years of age. 

.\nna Pratt, well known as one of the 
earliest woman botanists, is still living 
at 82. Her greatest work, "Flowering 
Plants and Ferns of Great Britain," was 
begun in 1849, and on its appearance 
took rank with standard authorities. 
She revised it in 1880. 

Thomas B. Allen of F'lemington, W. 
Va., claims that he was the oldest sol- 
dier that served in the late war. He was 
over 70 years of age when he enlisted, 
and is now 98. 

President (iilman of Johns Hopkins 
university is in Spam, looking up Amer- 
ican antiquities in Seville. 



POLLING 

Boundarieit of Wards and Precincts and 
Where to Register. 

Below are given the places of registra- 
tion for the municipal election that is to 
take place on Feb. 4 next. 

First ward— .■Xsa Dailev's lumber office. 

Second ward— McBeth's grocery store. East 
Superior street. 

Third ward, first precinct— All territory east of 
LaUe avenue to Third avenue east. Poll- 
ing place. No. lat) East First street. 
Second precinct— All territory between Third 
avenue east and .Si.xth avenue east. Poll- 
ing place, 3^5 East Superior street. 
Third precinct -All territory between Sixth 
avenue east and Tenth avenue ea.st. Poll- 
ing place, corner of Superior street 
and Washington avenue. ^ 

Fourth ward, first precinct— .\11 lor-itory bo 
tween Lake avenue and Third avenue west 
north of the First ward limits. Polling 
place. Howard building. 113 West First 
street. 
Second precinct -All territory between 
Third avenue west and Sixth avenue west. 
Polling place.41» West Su|)crior street. 
Third precinct— All territory Iwtween Sixth 
avenue west and Twelfth avenue west 
Polling place. 101 Wo.st Superior street. 

Fifth ward, first precinct— All that part of 
Fifth ward north of Northern Pacific rail- 
road yards and east of Garfield avenue. 
Polling place, luaj West SuiHjrior street. 
Second precinct- All that part of Rices 
Point south of Northern I'acific railrt)ad 
yards. Polling place. KW Garfield avenue. 
Third procinct-All that part of the ward 
west of Garfield and Piedmont avenues 
and north <>f the Northern Pacific railroad 
yards. Polling place, ISttJ West Michigan 
stieet. 
Sixth ward— Polling place. No. 2331 West 
Michigan street. 



'S. 



RHYME OF THE KL 



An Old Lady, a Stranger and a 

Goose Constitute the 

Subject of a 



Little Story, Which, if you Have 

the Leisure, You Might 

Read. 



Whether True or False We Cannot Say; At any 

Rate. Some Useful Lessons May be 

Gathered Therefrom. 



Rushing Things. 

Cloquet Pine Knot: At O'Brien's 
camp, on the St. Louis, about sixty-five 
men are employed and nine four-horse 
teams. Eight hundred thousand feet 
of logs have already been banked, and it 
is expected to put in between now and 
breaking up time, enough more to make 
between 5.000,000 and 6,000,000. The 
haul is five and a half miles. This camp 
is situated about twenty-five miles from 
Cloquet. and four miles from the Du- 
luth .t Winnipeg road. 

The IIypert>orean Scheme. 

Sault Ste. Marie News: Those who 
read the prospectus of the Sault Ste. 
Marie & Hudson Bay Railway companv 
and heretofore have been uninformed 
will be amazingly surprised at the re- 
ixjrted richness of' the territory adjacent 
to us on the north. The statements are 
based upon the words of the leading 
men of their pursuits in Canada. The 
Hudson Bay outlet idea is an old one, 
and like many others, has had to await an 
opportune age for its utilization. The 
time now seems to have come, and pros- 
pects indicate an early connection of 
Canada's great inland sea and America's 
wonderful chain of lakes. The advan- 
tage of such an accomplishment to this 
city is hard to estimate. It will be of 
vast magnitude. 



SPORTING NOTES. 



THE POLITICAL ONLOOKER. 



The city republican committee as named by 
the chairman Is as follows: William Stephen, 
First Ward; E. S. Palmer, Second ward; N. F. 
Hugo, Third ward; C. A. Duncan, Fourth 
ward; H. S. Lord. Fifth ward; N. N. Oie, Sixth 
ward. 

* * » 

The democrats and independents held a 
political meeting last night in Normanna hall, 
which, though not wholly inglorious, could 
hardly be termed successful. The speakers 
were T. M. Erickson, John Lundberg, J. K. 
Shaw, Tom Connors, John A. Anderson and E 
S. KadcUffe. 

* * • 

T. B Perry his finally cooBented to become 
a c-andidate for alderman from the Sixth ward. 
Mr. Perry is a goo<l man. The Sixth ward has 
so many good candidates that it is hard to tell 
which Is best. 

* * * 

Toflay will be the last opportunity to regis- 
ter before election. As there are three candi- 
dates for mayor, who will all do their best to 
l>e elected, and the contest In c<m8e<iuence Is 
likely to be close, it Injliooves every voter to 
see that his name is on the poll list before the 
board ef registry mJjourns at 7 o'clock tonight 

* ♦ * 

TheG' rman-speaklng cltlzens>)f Duluth will 
hold a mass meeting at Turner hall Sunday af- 
ternoon to unite and agree on a ticket for the 
Cuming city election. 



The Wttather Bulletin. 

Meteorological report received at 
Minn., 8 a. m. Jan 2h, isjnj. 



Dulutb 



PLACES. Bar. Ther. 



Duluth 30.46 

Pt Arthur.. ;».4H 
Winnipeg . . l.-JO.ie 
St. Vincent .10.14 
Q'Apuelle 39.9K 
AAsinib'oe .•*«.«« 

Helena lau.lx 

Huron, Dak i30.28 
St. Paul . ..j30.ftS 
La Crosse.. 9).6h 
BUmarck .TO. 10 
Moorheai ..|;J0.22 



14 
2 

l£ 
1« 
14 
34 
30 
3S 
10 
K 
St 
22 



Wind Bain. 



SW 
Calm 
S 
S 

SW 
SW 
SB 
SE 
E 



NB 

S 



Weather 



.\ New York dispatch says: Dave Orr, 
last year's first baseman of the 
Columbus team, and Thomas Kinslow, 
catcher for the London, Ont. club, have 
signed contracts to play with the Brook- 
lyn Brotherhootl club, the coming sea- 
son. 

Cornell university has again chal- 
lenged Yale and Harvard to an eight- 
oared race in the spring. 

Jimmy Lynch and Billy Murphy, the 
Australian featherweight, who recentlv 
defeated Ike Weir, will probably be 
matched to fight before the California 
Athletic club for a purse of 81800. 

John Duane is the latest aspirant for 
a position on the New York Players' 
league team. He is a wonder behind the 
bat, and "Buck" Ewing says he thinks 
he will be a great man for the club. 

The meeting of the National league 
which was to have been held today has 
been postponed till tomorrow at 12 
o'clock noon. Chairman Young of the 
board of arbitration has called a special 
meeting of the board, to \ie held at the 
Fifth Avenue hotel. New York, Wednes 
day morning at 10 o'clock. 

President Hewett, in an interview 
today, said that the negotiations which 
have been pending for several weeks be- 
tween himself and the Baltimore club, 
looking to a consolidation of the two 
teams, had virtually been concluded. Mr. 
Hewett said that the beet evidence of 
his sincerity to give this city a team 
bext season was apparent in the fact 
that he had just closed a contract for a 
five-years' lease of a section of ground 
situated in the northwestern part of the 
city. 

A neltrat« Situation. 

Lyre: Mr. Wombat— 'Xcuse me, boss, 
IS dis yere a city hall or a souf ferry 
train? 

Long Wing- Please tellee me what 
station I gettee off, Mist'r; I wan tee go 
Livington street! 

Finn (to himself)— Av anny o' me 
fri'nds should see me now Oi'd be dish- 
graced foriver. 



Attention, Property Holders! 

The undersigned are a committee ap- 
pointed by a meeting representing all 
classes of property holders in the Third 
division of Duluth. 

They were appointed to secure theco- 
operation of all property holders in the 
division who desired to join in a suit to 
quiet the adverse <;laim of Frederick 
Prentice to an undivided one-half inter- 
est in the division. 

The Prentice claim has been twice ad- 
versely adjudicated by the courts, and 
is generally and justly regarded as with- 
out any foundation whatever. Never- 
theless, he persists in asserting it, and 
can make it a source of annoyance and 
embarrassment to property holders for 
many years to come, unless aggressive 
measures are taken by property holders 
to dispose of it. In the absence of ag- 
gressive measures, there is also danger 
that valuable testimony in support of 
the regular title may " be lose by the 
death of witnesses. 

It is proiK>sesd that all property hold- 
ers in the division who desire to take the 
necessary steps to quiet their title, shall 
join in one suit against Prentice for that 
purpose; and in order that every prop- 
erty holder in the division may have the 
benefit of such an action at a compara- 
tively trifling expense, public notice of 
this proposed suit is hereby given. 

All those who, in order to participate 
in the benefits of the action, are willing 
to contribute to its expense in propor- 
tion to the value of their several prop- 
erties, should call immetliately at the 
office of Snively, Craig &, Green, in the 
First National bank building (they hav- 
ing been employed to assist in the pre- 
liminary work of organization), and leave 
their names and a description of their 
Third division properties. 

Property holdere are particularly cau- 
tiooed that the action will benefit only 
those who become parties to it. 
Dated Jan. 23, 1889. 

M. R. Baldwin, 

G. G. ILvKTLEY, 
L. M. WlL^UTS, 

Committee. 



Dyspepsia 

Makes Uie Uves of many people miserable, 
caushig distress after eating, lour stomach, 
Blck headache, heartburn, loss of appetite, 
a faint, "all gone" feeling, l).ad taste, coated 

Ditt4-rAaa *""S"«' »"* Irregularity of 
t/l Stress the bowels. Dyspepsia does 
Afte? not get well of ItseU. It 
Eatin? requires careftil attention, 
***'"S and a remcdj- like Hood's 
Barsaparilla. which acts gently, fet efficiently. 
It tones the stomach, regulates tho diges- 
tion, creates a good ai)- mi t^ 
petite, banLshes headache, OiCK 
and refreshes the mind. HoadachO 
" I have been troubled with dyspepsia. I 
had but little appetite, and what 1 did eat 
Heart' (^'stressed mo, or did me 
1^ little good. Alter eating 1 
DUrn would have a lalnt or tired, 
all-gone feeling, as though I had not eaten 
anything. My trouMe was aggravated by 
my business, painting. Last e-k 
spring I took Hood's Bar- wOUf 
saparlll.!, which did mo an StOmaCh 
Immense amount of good. It gave me an 
appetite, and my food relishe<il and satisfied 
the cr.-iving I had previously experienced." 
Gkokge A. Page, Watcrtowa, Mass. 

Hood's Sarsaparilla 

Sold hy .111 dniggUts.'si ; six for fi Pre^^d only 
b7C. I. HOOD A CO.. AiHJthecariQH, Lowell, Mass. 

ICO Doses One Dollar 



CHICHESTEH-8 ENGLISH 

PENNYROYAL PILLS 

~S%. RED CnoSS DIAMOND BRAND. 

./^VA '^•"" *"' "■'«."" r,-li«bl». LmdiM, 

f\ ip^^tl "^ KrucEtai fur IHamond Brand, in 

"^^ r»d. init»lh.> boim. j.«lt.i with blue 

ribbno Take DO otkrr. All plll« 

In ii»iiwho»r.i boies. pink wrap|.7n. «r« 

ammmrrou» p«unterr«lu. Spnil 4«. 

*"lan.:.>> r.^r parciculftr«, testimonial! _.«, 

"Kfllef for LadlM," in Utter, hj retara 

^•U. Sane Paper. 

CklckMler ntm-l (-«., H«4kM 84., FklI>.,Ilb 




WHITE BEAVER'S 

HEALS DISEASED LUNGS. DRUGGISTS SELL IT 

T. H. S PENCE, LA CROSSE. WIS. 



THE STORY Of A YEAK. 



PHOTOORAPH 
FROM LIFE 

TAKEN 

ONE YEAR 

AOO. 




LA GRIPPE 



A Few Pointers. 



PHOTOGRAPH 

FROM Lire 

AS SHI 

NOW 

4PPEARS. 




Persons who have a cold are much more 
likely to take the influenza or so called la 
grippe. 

It is much more severe when accompanied by 
a cold. ' 

The most critical time is when recovering 
from the disease, as slight exposure will often 
cause a relapse, and that is almost certain to 
end In lung fever or pneumonia. 

The feet should be kept dry and warm, the 
body well clothed and care used to avoid ex- 
posure. 

The bowels should be kept regular, and per- 
sons physically weak should take quinine to 
keep up the vitality. 

With these precautions and a free use of 
Chamberlain's Cough Remedy a prompt re- 
covery Is reasonably certain. That remedy Is 
unequalled for a severe cold, and this disease 
requires preci»ely the same treatment. For 
sale by Boyce & Totman. 



Cloudless 

Cloudy 

P't Cloudy 

Cloudless 

P't Cloudy 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 



The verdict for Thomas Timlin in his 
suit against the city to recover damages 
from the Bunnell block basement last 



Tin rain oolumn indicates trace. One <!) 
inch of rain or melted snow equals ten (10) In- 
ches of snowfall. .Minus (-) in temperature 
column indicates below zero. 

W. H. Fallon, 

Serreant Sljrnal Corps 

Duluth, .Tan. 28.— Z.oca/ forecast for 
twenty-four houm, ending 10 a. m. Jan. 
29 : Warmer, fair weather. 



LOVER'S SOLILOQUY. 



Mr. P. A. Burdick, the temperance 
lecturer, received a telegram that his 
family were in better health; he will 
therefore remain here a while longer. 



Togro. or not to go; 

Thuts the nuestlon! 
Whether 'tis best to stay. 

And suffer sus|iense dreadful. 
Or uke the risk of a rejection. 

And, by ^oinr. end it. 

HiM Impending Fut«i. 

Lyre: "I'm just as happy as a l>ig 
sunflower," he sang, while he preserved 
his equilibrium against a lamp post, and 
favored the crowd with a performance 
on his own account. 

"Yes," observed a bystander, "and 
you'll resemble it more than ever in the 
morning, when your head has expanded 
to the regulation size !" 

Dancing and Deportment, 

Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 

names for his second term at No 113 

West First street. Ladies' class, xMon- 

days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gen t«', 

Wednesdays, at 8 p. m. 



6PERCENTI 



"Look on this picture and then on that." Tho 
aboTe faces are exact reproductions of photo- 
graphs taken from life of Mrs. Morton D. Har- 
lan, who resides at No. 55 West 2»th Street, New 
York City. The first one was taken in Novem- 
ber. 1PH7. while in the last stapes of consump- 
tion, abandoned by physicians and niournetl bv 
friends. The other was taken in I)ecenibef. 
1**. when completely reooveriHl, and entirely 
through the use of Dr. Ackers English Remedy 
for Consumption. The above pictures are wood 
cuts, hut they are true to life and the orijriimi 
photographs, taken from life, can be seen at all 
the dnigr stores. Mrs. Harlan's consumption 
began as consumption usnallv does, with a 
cough in the morning, raising of phlegm, tired 
and depressed feelings, a lack of appetite, the 
Uws of flesh and pains throughout the body. 
She did not realize her e.Ttreme danger until it 
becam^ almost too late, but she is in perfect 
health V>-day. Dr. Acker's English Reme<lT 
for Consumption is sold by all reputable drug, 
gists. You can't afford to be without it 

For Sale in Duluth by Boyce & Totman 



J. D. & R. 0. RAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 



ROOM "B, 



HUNTER BLOCK. 



B. C. GRIDLKY. J. C. MI8HLRB 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 

Real Estate Brokers 

Room 36. Bxchang« Building. 
Llstyour property with us at what Ills worth 
and we will sell It. We invite everybody to 
call in and see us. and solicit o.>rre8pondence 



We have at command unlimited 
amounts of money to lend promptly 
at 6 per cent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



COFHII i WAimER 



30 FAKGUSSON BLiX)K. 



Loans Made on Unimproved Propertj. 



BUILDINQ LOANS A SPECIALTY. 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTQAQES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONDS BOUGHT. 



40 Acres, section 30-48-14. 
I 20 Acres, section 34-48- 1 4. 

BO Acres, section 32-4"^- 1 3. 

40 Acres, section 18-50-14. 
I 20 Acres, section 6-49- 1 6. 

40 Acres, section 2-60- 1 6. 

40 Acres, section 32-48-14. 

40 Acres, section 26-48- 1 6. 

20 Acres, section 28-48-13. 

40 Acres, section 24-50-16. 
120 Acres, section 30-60.15. 



CUGOE i PRIIIDLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 

Duluth National Bank Building. 



All below the market. 

r 

COFFIN & WARNER 




For LadieH. Special classes every after- 
noon at ParHons' Business (College, sec- 
ond Hoor. 



" I knew an old wife, lean and poor. 
Her rags scarce held together; 
There strode a stranger U> the door. 
And it was windy weather. 

He held a goose -jpon his arm. 

He utter d rhyme and reason : 
'Here, take the goose and keep you warm* 

It is a stormy season.' ' 

She caught the white goose by the leg; 

A goose— 'twas no great matter; 
The goose let fall a golden egg 

With cackle and with clatter. 

She dropt the goose and caught the pelf. 
And ran to tell her neighbors; 

And biess'd herself, and cursed herself. 
And rested from her labors." 

—Tennyson. 

Qur readers may possibly 
think that ihe foregoing poem 
is rather far-fetched. But after 
all, when rightly considered, it 
contains some food for reflec- 
tion. There are a great many 
people who have a hard strug- 
gle in life, and often when 
everything seems darkest and 
the surroundings are the most 
discouraging, they are nearest 
port. It is an old saying that 
"The darkest hour is just be- 
fore day." This old lady in 
the rhyme saw an opportunity 
and she didn't wait to ask how 
old the goose was; whether it 
was fat or lean; or whether, on 
the whole, she had better ac- 
cept or decline. She took it 
"too quick," and in seizing the 
tirst good piece of fortune in- 
stanter, another and a greater 
one immediately followed. In 
acquiring a competence, the 
first thousand dollars is gener- 
ally the most difficult to ac- 
quire. Many times people 
work long and hard and have 
to practice rigid economy to 
get a btart, and then get into 
the right current and drift on 
to fortune with apparent ease. 
But such people never refuse 
splendid opportunities, or turn 
their backs on small things. It 
is the easiest thing in the world 
to make money if you only get 
into the right drift. The old 
lady had faith that the goose 
was a good one, and she "caught 
on" so quick that the goose 
yielded up a golden egg and the 
poor woman's fortune was made. 
Now, you may smile when we 
apply the moral to something 
practical. It would have been 
no more unwise for the dear old 
lad}' to have refused to accept 
the goose till she had first been 
introduced to the stranger and 
ascertained that he was of a re- 
spectable family, than it is for 
you to stand hesitating as to 
whether you should buy lots in 
Crosley Park at the give away 
prices we are oifering. In 
a year from now we will all 
see how ridiculous it was for 
Mr. Crosley to sell such fine 
property at such prices (to say 
nothing of the terms) and for 
you to stand by looking on when 
you should have known that val- 
ues must inevitably make t,uch 
large advances in so shoit a 
time. When spring opens up 
(and there is but one more 
month of winter) there will be 
from fifty to one hundred new 
houses built in Crosley Park 
and Lester Park adjoining. 
Within six months suburban 
trains will run each wa}' every 
half hour from 6 a. m. till mid- 
night, and the fare will proba- 
bly be the same as st«eet car 
fare. Then, too, within a year 
you can build a $50,000 resi 
dence down there if you wish, 
and you can have water, sewers 
and electric lights the same as 
you have in Duluth. All these 
things are now assured, and 
those who buy Crosley Park 
lots by the quantity at present 
prices will make big money. 
We propose to advance prices 
soon and we suggest that it 
would be a good idea to buy 
before that time; i e, if you 
care to niake money. There is 
always a time to buy and a time 
to sell, and now is the time to 
buy lots at Crosley Park, and 
any time during the next five 
}ears you will have opportuni- 
ties of selling so as to make 
large profits. Call at the office 
and get further information. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 



DR. GEO. B. HAYCOCK. 



Manager 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 16 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



IiiiEiiTsmiOT I r I I 
cSjuesday.Fey 



NIGHIS AND 

mma 

COMMEtCIIIG 

Grand Matinee Wednesday, 2 p.m 

Jefferson Taylor's Aquatic Specta<le 

A DARK SECRET 

Real Itov Boats. Canoes, Itacing Shells and 
bteam Launches, laden with pleasure-se<"ker4 
on aKIVEK OF KK.4L WATKK. ^^"^ '**^'^* 

Incorj orated in the story of this Drama 

THE CiREAT HENLEY REGATTA, 

For which 1250 8«|. ft. of the stage will tie 
flooded V 1th 5000 cubic feet of water, from 
two to e ght feet deep. 



EOWARD 



HANLANI 

world will ap- 



The Chan pion oarsman of the 
|)ear in his own racing shell 

America's Noted Acrobats, 

THE HERBERT BROTHERS, 

III their unsurpassed gyrations. 

THE /ARLINGTON QUARTET, 

In beautiful vocal selections on the Kiver. 
The Realistic Drawing Scene! The Terrific 
Rain Storm ; The Race for the Diamond Sculls ! 

Sale of I eats opens Thursdaj-, Jan. 31. Prices 
as usual. 



PEOPLES THEATER. 



Duuum, 



JOHN 8. BARNES, IMgr. 



The Besi Vanetj Show in the Northwest 

This week, commencing JAN. 27, 

Open every night. You should see our 

list of Stars this week. 



Admission: Gallery, IQc; Parquet, 25c; 

Orchestra Chairs, 35c; Box 

Seats, 50c. 



Doors oi)en at 7:30; performance commenc-ce 
at >*::tO. 



REAL ESTATE. 



SPECIAL LIST 



BARGAINS 



OFFERED BY 



C. E. RICHARDSON. 



Acreage .>n the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undivldtd half interest In this forty 
acres can be had for $52,000 

80 Acres it West End, near Broolc- 
dale Di\ision 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 1 50 

I O Acres i t the heart of the East End, 
on both lidas of Fourth street 30,000 



The best bargain offered now is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which Is safe and 
sure. An nvestment of a small sum will carrv 
as large i rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Ouluth 
has promised so large returns. A limited 
amount st il for sale. 



OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned, 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER. 106 Second St. East. 



WANTS. FOB SALE, ETC 



ONE CENT A AURD IN ADVANCE. 



Advertisements under this boad received at 
the lollowiug places, besides the business of- 
Uce ut I'iie Herald : 



Tentli avenue east. 
Fourth avenue 



Kndiun I'bariuacy, I 
Koyce ic Totiuan, corner 
and tsuperior street west, 
J. W. KelMtn, No. IHOI, comer Eierhteenth 

avenue west ana buperior street. 

U. Jubuiwu, chief clerk l-hilUps hotel. West 
Uuluth. 



Help MaDted. 

W'^^l'^^V^T^''"' for general housework. 511 
fcabt 1 bird tlreoi. 



C CANVASSERS Wanted to sell Iwst Ameri- 
, can wulcljes; big commiBsiou to r«>il»bie 
"'VVw^.''?'*'*'^- ^•,.^?"^', agent Minne- 
Kjta W atch company, 'iiti fourin avenue west. 



WANTED— A cook for a smaU family 
quire, aaj East Second street. " 



In 



w 



ANl'ED— A txjy at St. Lukea boepital. 



iV\ ISH to employ a few ladies on salary to 
take charge ot my business at their homes, 
ivigbi, very latociuaimg and healthtul. Wa^es 
»lu |x;r week, iteteivuc-e gi\'eu. Uood pay lor 
pan time. Address with ttamp. Mrs. Marion 
>V alter, Ix)uisviUe. K.y. 



WANTtl>— A girl for general house work; 
lumily ol luree. Call ia forenoon, 411 
Niutha venue oast. 



SK( i^^A^"^'.*W expeubos In advance. 
^yjyj allowed each uiouiu. Steady em- 
l.ioi mcul ul home or tmveliug. No Buliciuug. 
Uuues deuvcriug aud making uollectious No 
postal cards. AUOresb wiiii siamu. Hater Ac 
Co.. I'iquu, Ohio. 



WANTED— Pastry cook. 
Inquire Phillips hotel. 



also other help. 



w 

secoud 



ANXED— At the Womans Employment 



Bills and a Uozeu girlt lor general 
house Work. Employment obtaiued tree of 
cost. Mib. A. U. Ayci-s. 



For n»lts. 

LT'OR SALE— A heavy working team cheap 
X: at A. W. Eiier'bao*L,akeaveuueboutn. 



J."^C)R SALE— My residence with 60 or lOU feet 
X; at 31o East second street. Terms to suit 
purchaser. E. A. UUbert Kl Hoard of 'I'rade 



HEAVi HORSES hX)H SALE-16 head of 
heavy horses, raised at Lake Park, on 
iiie Northern Paciflc road, lor sale by C. W. 
Harvey. Can Oe seen at Uowaru baru, on the 
lake shore. Minnesota point. Residence. SSI 
W est Fourth slivet. 



Lost, 

f OST— Part of a gold-link cuff button in 
X-i shape of throe rings. Lost iu Superior 
or Duluth. liuder will receive reward by 
leaving the same at my office. Robert G . Mc- 
Dowell, J:;; West superior street. 



Fur Kent. 

IpOR RENT-Dcsirable room: 
I steam, etc. ; urivate family. 
Herald ollice. 



bath, gas. 
Address S.. 



C. I 



:. RICHARDSON, 

25 West Superior Street. 




AT OHCE! 



$2,50(1 Mortgage. 
$1,00(1 Mortgage. 
$800 Mortgage. 
$600 Mortgage. 
$200 Mortgage. 

Loans of other sizes negotiated on 
twenty-fcur hours' notice. 

N. J. UPHAM, 

Under First Nat. Bank, 



Wanted— To Kent. 

WANTED— A turuished house for the win- 
ter. L. J. Taussig, No. HPiiocuix block. 



D' 



FinanciaL 

LUTH MORTGAGE LOAN COMPANY 

loans mouei' In any amount on furni- 
lui-c, pianos, horses and wa^sons without re- 
moval irom owner's ixtssessiou: also on ware- 
house receipts, bank slocks, and any properly 
ol value; uotesdibcouute.i; partial payments 
received and jour own lime granted lor pay- 
r>ent; uo delai'; money on hand and furnished 
immediately alter security Is approved. Wm. 
Horkau, Manager, Room 1^, ir'argussou block, 
Duluin, Minn. 



IF vol WISH TO SELL OR BLT DULLTH 
or £5Uf»erior bank stuck, corporation or in- 
\i,btmeut securitieb, call on or address B. Mur- 
phiu, broker, '.< Bauuiug block, Duluth. Minn. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



Jl.^ • sell 



WILSON, ATTORNEY AND OOUN- 
sellor at Law. Will practice in State 
and L nited States Courts. All business given 
prompt attention, 44 Fargussou Block, Duluth, 
Miun. 





LU 
< 

co 

LU 

< 
LU 

DC 



o 

UJ 

O 

_i 

o 

GO 

UJ 

U 

z 
u 
o 

z 
o 

Q. 
(0 
lU 

cc 
cc 

o 
o 



■pLASTERlNG. 

H. T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobbing 
promptly attended to. Ollloe. room D. Hun- 
ter block. 



M 



RS. J. 8. DINWOODIB. 



Teacher of Piano Forte. Voice and Sight Sin^ 
ing. Chorus and Choir Conductor. 



Music rooms at J. J. Wiggins's, 16 East Su 
perlor street, and at resldenoe, 131 Tenth ave. B 



M* 



H. PARKER ROBINSON, 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION, 
8 MILES BLOCK. 



MCMILLEN & STEBBINS. ARCtflTECTB 
and superintendents. Office, room No. 
— . lixchauge building. 



X3ALMKR & HALL. ARCHITECTS 
tendenti 

E. S. Palmer. L. 



AT Superiutendents.room 4ti. Exchange 
ing. Duluth. Minn. E. S. Palmer. L. P. Hall 



AND 

build- 



w.c. 




ao., 



RICH'D F. MARVIN, 

REAL ESTATE, LOANS 



REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

BAVB GKNUIirE BAKO^IMS IN 

LOTS ^ BLOCKS, 

In dlffei parts of the cl^ and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 



I NS 

Rooms I 
DULUTH, 



—AND — 

U R A N C E . 

2. Exchange BIdg. 

MINN. 



All we aek Is for ji rtles to examine our list and 

compare them rith other prices l>efore 

buying. Call or write. 



W. C. Sherwood & Co., 



c. I im & CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 



HUMPHREYS' 

Dr. HuHTHB. :r8> Spbcitk-s are stlentlflcall v and 
carefully prep jred prescriptions ; used for manv 
years In prlval ?practlce with succoss.and fororer 
Ihlrt V years us -d by the pt"<>ple. Every single Spo- 
ciflc^te a spt<cl8 1 cure for the disease nami5l 

These bpeolilcs cure without dnigelnB "nnnf- 
i^SiTw'^"'''"''^?"' system, and areS fli-t iS 
deed the BOTei -eign femediea o f the World. 

LIST or PsraciF u. hos. ccbxs. pmces. 

1 VgYen, ingestion, loflanunatlon ... .25 
^ KSf""', ^1°."" Fever. Worm Cone M 

3 Cry Ins Colic, orTeethlng of Infants Ai 

4 Diarrhea, orchUdreuOTAduJite AH 

6 Cholera III orbaa. Vomiting.. Ai 

t Congha, Cold, Bronchitis.^ Ax 

g Kearala: a, Toothacfce, Faceache '.'.'. 

. X Headaclea, SIckHeadache, Vertigo 

10 Dyspepsi a, BUlous Stomach..... T. 

-* 8,WJl>"«»<'ed or Painful Periods. 

Whites, ;oo Profuse Periods 

C«?"|»» C )ngh. DUBcnlt Breathing ... 

= s vJU* Khcam, Eryslnelas, Emptlons. 

is £^B<^Bina lUm, Rbeiunatlc Pains.. 

?2 £ey«ranl Agae, ChUIs, Malaria. . 

IT Piles, Pllr.dor Hleedlng 



THE SPALDING, 



E. P. EMERSON. Proprietor. 



Slrictli Fifst-Class in all tppointments. 



DULUTH. 



MINN. 



Catarrh, Xnfluenra, Cold In the Head . 
Whoopin g Coogh. V'olent Coughs. . 
fleneral l>ebill(v.rh}-glcalWeaJcne88 . 
Kidney I disease . 

3« SofTons >ebiHty 1. 
.'! xr'"*'"^ l^^e^kness. Wetting Bed. . 
2 Diseases of theHeart.Palpltatlon 1. 



RninpbrprB'NedicineCo.lU&'FultonSt.N yI 



CIFI CS 



A. FITGER & GO'S 

Lake Superior Brewery 

IB the largestln the State of Mir v«ot. o« swe 



Gbk.*t French remedy. Dr. LeDuc'e pkb- 
lODiCAL riiA.H. from Paris, Prance, .^t only on 
the gfueriitive organs in female^ and ijel- 
tlvely curt^ suppression of menses ( from what- 
ever cause*, and all perlo.llcal troub™r^cu- 
llar to women. A safe, reliable - *^^^ 

ranted to excite menstruation 

Vi^ i!» :J''"'"''* '*."* be used during pregnancy 
The large proiH)rtion of the ills to whlc™ladS^ 
are subject is the dirtx^t result of a disorterS 
* fl ri^'*"" 'nt-nstruatlon. Kobt. Sieved 
„yi- ''IS^^^'^^-H- Boswarth & Co.. M^- 
waukee. Wholesale Agt». The genuine mW 
!„&•! *^ »>y Boyce & iSSna^'^iolf A^.. "Slj 



remedy, war- 
or money re- 
ngprei 






/ 



'/ 





-^4- 




^'■■■r— 



i 



/ 



r 







1 










'I 




n 




rfl 



mmmm 



(MtMMlWMMI 



DULUTH EVEKXNG HEBAU) JANXJABY 28 1890. 



DOLOTH TO W1IP[G 



Added Particulars of 
road Company's 
Meetings. 



the Rai 
Last 



Opinion of a High Public Offi- 
cer on What it Makes 
Duluth. 



The 



St, Cloud Koad Elects 
Officers; Some Rail 
Notes. 



The newa as published in The Herald 
last night of the Duluth i Winoipeg 
road, from the vice-president cf the con- 
struction company that is building the 
line.who j ust returned.f rom several i m por- 
tanr meetings held at Mew York, proved 
of not a little general local interest. 
There is a very universjil feeling among 
Duluth people that the Duluth &. Win- 
nipeg ri)ad is destined to be the most 
important of all roads entering this city 
from the West, Southwest or North and 
any authentic news regarding it will 
always be of great interest. 

At the meetings held last week, and 
which Mr. Munger attended, it was de- 
cided to at once increase the paid up 
capital stock of the company from $700- 
000 to $1,000,000, the latter representing 
cost of the ninety miles of line to 



the 



A COUNC IL IN C OUNSEL. 

A Siuall Aoiouut of Work Turned Out by 
City Fatheni. 

There was only a small grist of busi 
ness to attend to at the council meeting 
last night, and this was speedily disposed 
of. The city engineer's estimate of 
doGjyu.'Jt! in favor of Wolf & Truax was 
presented. 

The tire commissioners reported that 
the city is practically without fire pro- 
tection above Third street, and advised 
the purchase of a new engine. R. P. 
Porter, census commissioner, asked for 
documents giving data on Duluth for 
the eleventh census. L. B.Moore A Co., 
applied for a i)ool table license. The 
Standard Oil company put in bids for 
oil for the city at ^%, Vl\ andl2i4 centu 
per gallon. Albertson &. Chamberlain 
bid ^355.4.j on stationery supplies. Dun- 
can Brewer &, Co. bid i?10..T0 per thou- 
sand on lumber; W. T. Himebaugh bid 
8;).50; John (J. Howard, 811.45. Chapin- 
Wells Hardware company put in 
bids on hardware, J. D. O'Donnell and 
John McFee on cordwood. M. J. Davis 
was authorized to purchase clothing for 
prisoners that they might be able to 
shovel snow. 

Of $1370.78 due Lundgren i; Johnson 
it was decided the amount due for labor 
and materials should be deducted and 
the balance handed over to them. An 
order of §275 was drawn in favor of Al- 
derman Thomas to pay the bills for en- 
tertaining the visiting editors. A reso- 
lution was introduced instructing the 
clerk to notify theater managers that 
the selling by them of intoxicants would 
result in a forfeiture of their licenses. 
Referred. The ordinance authorizing 
the arrest of property owners for not 
clearing sidewalks of snow and ice was 
referred. 



THE COUNTY'S AIINUAL 



Financial Statement of St. 

Louis County for Last 

Year. 



WEST END. 



from 



The Usual Remarkably Good 

Showing as to 

Stability. 



Arthur Levasseur has retured 
visit to relatives in Montreal. 

H. E. Hackett went to Minneapolis 
yesterday on a short business trip. 

J. Biorn, of Crookston, Minn., is in the 
West End looking over a location for a 
livery stable. 

The Ladies Aid society of the Metho- 
dist church will meet tomorrow at Mrs. 
G. J. Wilner's residence on Michigan 
Street. All are requested to bring need- 
les and thimbles. 



DOLOTH 



MEMBERS OF THE 

CLEARING HODSE ASSOCIATION. 



WANTED 



The following financial information 
will be very interesting to taxpayers and 
the public generally. It gives the con- 
dition of St. Louis county funds for 1889 
up to Jan. 6, and will probably reach the 
public through the official paper in 
about a month: 

At the beginning of 1889 there was a 

total of 371,4.j1 remaining in the treasury 

belonging to eight different funds as 

follows: 

County revenue fund |27 104 44 

Poor farm '"jg,, ' |y 

.Spt'ciiil road tax '.'.'.'.'..'.'.', hSI^.^A 

Bond Interest 3 16«> f>9 

Bond sinking i....."."" lo;434;93 

.lull lUUd IH IIIA flA 

Kedemptlon fund 253128 

^""•P'us 'mi.-Si 



East Knd Skatlni; Kink. 
David N. Morison, champion fast 
skater of Duluth, and W. W. Brown, 
champion fast skater of Wisconsin, will 
skate three races at above rink on the 
following dates for §50 a side and a gold 
medal to be given by the rink, Friday 
evening, Jan. 24th. distance, three miles; 
Tuestlay evening, Jan. 28th, distance, 
three miles; and Thursday evening, Jan. 
.30, distance, five miles, the one winning 
best two out of three races to be declared 
the winner. Judges to be selected on 
the ice. Walkers military band will be 
in attendance. 



American Exchange Bank 
Bell & Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of Commerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
100,000 

1,000,000 

100,000 

100,000 

100,000 

250,000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

10,000 

100,000 

25,000 



'ZIG-ZAG.* 



the Mississippi already completed, and 
the equipment necessarv to run the line 
profitably, 'iesterday The Herald stated 
that equipment would be purchased at 
once. This equipment will consist at 
first of two large and powerful locomo- 
tives, two passenger cars, two 
combination cars, twenty five flat cars, 
and five box cars. Of course 
thia equipment will very soon 
be added to, but it was authorized to 
make this a tirst order to the manufactu- 
rers. 

The company has just filed a trust 
mortgage, covering all its properties, now 
and in future, to the (Juarante 
Loan A- Trust company of Philadelphia, 
for 87,0O0,tXX». It bears date July 1, 
1890, and is to run until July 1, 1929, the 
rate of interest to be ."> per cent, payable 
semi-annually. The mortgage covers all 
property of the company, as well as 
privileges, franchises, rentals, earnings 
and swamp lands, except 10 per cent of 
the last mentioned!, which is reserved 
for expenses incurred prior to 1888. It 
is issued as a matter of form to cover 
the bonds negotiated and about to be 
issued by the comi>any, bonds that will 
pay the company's way to the boundary 
line and wherever else it wants to go. 

Surveying for the line from Cloquet 
down to the city is now activelv going 
on, several parties being reported" in the 
field. The company now uses the St. 
Paul A Duluth tracks, and will probably. 
as soon as it takes charge of its own line, 
now run l»y the construction company, 
move its oScee here and run its trains 
out of the Union depot. 

As indicating what is thought of the 
Duluth .fc Winnipeg outside, may be 
cited the remarks of a very prominent 
government official, who in writing the 
editor of The Herald on pine lantls, savs 
,. ^"'"^h * Winnipeg road is practi- 
cally i)ointing through the center of the 
reservations containing the largest 
amount of standing pine timLier in the 
United States, east of the Rocky moun- 
tains. You can see from the map that 
with the extension of the Duluth .fc 
Winni|>eg road vast supplies for that re- 
gion will be fujmishetl from Duluth. 
\V hether it wilbfcr not make the head of 
the lake herea^r the Great Lumber 
Mart of the Northwest you can deter- 
mine.- 

There can be, there is, no doubt abjut 
It, the Duluth A Winnipeg will be at the 
boundary this year. 



A Large Houmc WitnesiteK the Performance 
of a Fairijhow. 

"Zig-Zag" is a conglomerate mass of 
nonsensical phrases, put together under 
the name of musical farce comedy: and 
although a comedy is supposed to have 
a plot "Zig-Zag" hasn't even the sem- 
blance of one. The piece is of the far- 
cial musical kind and the end in view 
is simply to give some clever people a 
chance to do and say some clever — and 
sometimes vulgar— things. What goes 
for plot is the unintentional stealing of 
some diamonds by two minstrel per- 
formers, who accidentally in "skipping" 
a hotel, take another man's valise and 
get away with it, while before it can be 
returned detectives are on their track. 
The backyard of a New York residence 
and the boudoir of a Turkish bath house 
are the scenes of action. 

That Anna Boyd has lost none of her 
grace and sprightliness her dancing last 
night showed; neither has her voice de- 
teriorated. As Flirt, the incorrigble 
Miss Boyd danced and sung herself into 
the favor of a Duiuth audience. As Mr. 
Hopper, .\lfred Wheelan is funny, but 
his comicalities sometimes overstep the 
boundaries of good taste, and descend 
into the vulgarities of the variety per- 
formances. 

Taken altogether, "Zig-Zag" makes a 
fair evening's entertainment. If Man- 
ager Tillotson would cut out the statue 
business, put in a few more nineteenth 
century songs, and eliminate the vul- 
garities, he would have one of the best 
musical farce comedy on the road. 



On Jan. 6, 1890, the following funds 
were overdrawn: 

County p<x)r fund 

Special road tax 

Kef u nded V. ". 

The following shows the 
totals, disbursements and 
treasury of each fund: 



2,8<H.6»i 

. ... WXi.fiT 
10.44 

collections, 
balance in 



Cojloc- 

tiOD. 



y revi 

Poor fund 

Poor farm 

Speci al road tax 
Bond interest.. 
Uond sinking' . 

Jail fund 

Koad and bri'yP 

bond interest. 

Redempt'n f'nd 

Surplus 

Kefunded . 



Deduct 

o'rd'f t 

CO. p'r.*2.806 66 
Do. CO. 

spl. r'd 906 59 
Hefded 10 44 



JKi3,«« 81 
;y,i»94 29 

•i m 

34.KH GO 
B,083 50 
2,<.I6K 61 

20,666 09 

2,777 09 
1..381 40 



Disbui-se- 
meuts. 



347 51 



il54,4W* 86 



County 
total . 



funds 



State fund 

State sch'l fund 



State 
total 



funds 



«»<,7nO 44 

21,6?..' 09 

292 16 

Vi.rri Si 

5,440 50 

4.349 .35 

2.000 00 

1,910 24 

1 42 

357 96 



Bal'cc In 
Treasury 



«n,949 81 



3.7!I9 69 
13,391 53 
£2,402 59 

777 09 

2,U12 44 

497 81 



»14.5,547 78 



«164,498 86 



S60,13B 79 
29.0fl6 0« 



They Hope to Build. 

The annual meeting of the Duluth, 
St Cloud &, Southern Railway company 
was held in St. Cloud a day or two ago 
at the Grand Central. John Cooper was 
elected president; D. B. Staith, vice 
president; G. T. Barr, secretan-; H. H. 
Carson, treasurer; and J. E. Hayward, 
C. L. At wood, E. Cross, George T. Barr, 
J. A. Willard, W. H. Twilford, William 
Greenleaf, John Murphy, D. E. Myers, 
H. C. Waite, H. H. Carson, L. T. Scott, 
A. J. Henderson, John Cooper, D. Young, 
M. D. Colchester, D. B. Smith and H. H. 
Carson a board of directors. The re- 
quired survey and plat of the road 
necessary to hold the land-grant has 
been made and tiled with the secretary 
of state. H. C. Waite, Carson, Barr, 
VVillardand Cooper were appointed an 
executive committee, with authoritv to 
negotiate with other railroad companies 
for building the road. 



LAUNCH O F THE MANOLA. 

The Minnesota Iron Company'!* First .Stoel 

Ship Launched at Cleveland. 

At the Globe works the other day the 
first steamship of the four under con- 
tract for the Minnesota Steamshij) com- 
pany, the Minnesota Iron company un- 
der another name, was launched. The 
ship is a fine one and will doubtless 
prove herself an honor to her builders. 
The honors of the <icca8ion were per- 
formed by the little girl, who has a cor- 
ner in those things, and she was named 
"Manola." The Manola has grand di- 
mensions— 292 feet keel, .312 feet over all, 
40 feet beam, 24^2 feet deep, with steel 
upper decks. Her engines are triple ex- 
pansion, 24, 38, 61 by 42, and she will 
carry two Scotch boilers, 12' 2 by 14: and 



City of Duluth- 
Gonoralfund. 
Street sewers. 
Hontled int'st. 
Fire dep"t 

Vill. of Duluth 
Uondcd intVt 
Bonded sinlc'^ 
Sewer fund... 
Park Pt, (fn'l 
Park P't. road 

Vili. of Tower— 
Street imji'v't 

Villajre of Ely- 
General fund. 
VIU. aasess't.. 



will be supplied by all the improvements 
that now enter into the construction of 
the modern steamship, including a Prov- 
idence steam windlass and a Williamson 
steam steering gear. 



WILL LABEL 'EM 



the 



Commi.sAiooer Westaway Will Brand 
Overalit on the Biggegt Place. 

Phillip Westaway of the board of 
works, has a job on his hands requiring 
some ingenuity to engineer. His official 
position gives him charge of the street 
work. He has been instructed to obtain 
clothing for the city prisoners that they 
can work on the streets shovelling snow. 
He has made an investigation of the 
wardroljes of the various prisoners, and 
finds that most of them are insufficiently 
clad. The question came up in his mind 
whether he should buy an outfit for the 
men who are up for seven days, believing 
that tfj do so would have the effect 
of keeping the county jail filled. On 
his applying for instructions on this 
point he was informed that he was to 
use his own judgment. 

Being thus thrown upon his own re- 
sources he has devised this plan: Each 
available prisoner will be supplied with 
boots and overcoat. These garments 
will be numbered and labeled in large 
characters on the back as the proi>erty 
of the city, so that when the prieoner's 
term has expired he will divest himself 
of the new clothing and don the garb he 
wore on entering the prison. Mr. West- 
away has not yet evolved a plan for 
keeping track of the txxjts. 



Not One in Ten 

Of the people you meet from day to day 
has perfectly pure, healthy blood. The 
hereditary scrofulous taint afflicts the 
large majority of people, while many 
others acquire diseases fr<jm impure air, 
improper fo<Kl and wrong indulgences 
Hence the imperative necessity for a re- 
liable bltKxl purifier like Hooil's Sarsa- 
parilla, which eradicates e.ery impur- 
ity, and gives to the blood vitality and 
health. It cures scrofula, salt rheum, 
humors, boils, pimples, acd all other af- 
TectKjns catised by impurities or poison- 
ous germs in the blood. All that is 
asked for Hood's SarsaparUla is that it 
b© given a fair trial. 

To the Public. 

Notice is hereby given that Frank A. 
Taylor is not in our employ, and we are 
not responsible for any representations 
made by him. 

The Dcluth Ml-.sic Co., 

. Succeeeors to W. J. Dyer k. Bro. 



Several Messages of Gratulatlon. 

M. O. Hall yesterday received the fol- 
lowing among congratulatory dispatches 
on his nomination: 

From Revenue Collector Johnson: 

Atwater, Minn., Jan. 27, 1890. 
To M. O. Hall: I congratulate you on 
your nomination. Anything I can do to 
swell your majority, call on me. 

M.\Rcu.s Johnson. 

FVom Representative Hall: 

W.\.sHi>oTON, D. C, Jan. 27. 
House of Representatives: Please 
accept my hearty congratulations on 
your nomination for mayor. 

D. S. Hall. 

From the Pioneer Press Company: 

Jan". 2tJ. 
Dear Hall: I read with pleasure the 
account of your nomination as the re- 
publican candidate for mayor of Duluth. 
There can be no question of the election 
in such a republican stronghold. 

D. E. Bajley. 

THOSE CITY BONDS 

Finally Talien Without Protect by Hayes Si 

Sons; What They Claim. 

Messrs. W. J. Hayes & Sons, the Cleve- 
land bankers, who bought the last issue 
of Duluth bonds at a high premium, 
have taken the bonds and have pent on 
the cash to pay for a large installment. 
So the matter ends, and the Cleveland 
bankers can not further be accused of 
bad faith and unfair dealing. 

There has been a go<jd deal of time 
lost in the taking up of these bonds and 
a good deal of fuss. Some of the Du 
luth papers have published a lot of cor- 
respondence ijetween Hayes & M^ns, and 
the city clerk that would go to show 
that the bankers were holding off till 
they had discovered the facts as to the 
city's financial condition, but that were 
twisted to read that the bankers would 
refuse to take the bonds. This latter 
interpretation was evidently, judging 
from the present condition of affaire, 
wrong. Whan one considers the large 
and very complimentary premium paid 
for these bonds it can readily be seen 
that the bankers shonld, out of mere 
business policy, look carefully into the 
condition of the city. Perhaps this 
course would- have been better had it 
been taken earlier. But the matter is 
now all settled and it is probable that 
all the minor points will soon be fixed 
satisfactorily to all concerned. 



Tn of Duluth— 

General 

Koad 

Tn of Oneota— 

General 

Koad 

Tn of F. du Lac 

General 

Koad 

Tnof KiceL'ke 

General 

Koad 

T'nof Hermt'n: 

General 

Koad 

Tn of Gnesen- 

General 

Koad 

T'n of Breitung 

General 

Road 

T'nof Canosla- 

Geueral 

Koad 



«79,30e 85 



l!t5,3P7 m 

2»4.710 10 

28,101 64 

57,251 JIO 

7,!K» 23 

2.001 04 

60 10 

894 11 

866 42 



t 145.547 78 

«.T«.:«» 79 
29,066 06 



$79,2UB 85 



I74.»a) 86 



.3,721 67 



»71,099 111 



Around the World. 

There was a time when a man who had 
circled the globe was a nine day's won- 
der, and if dime museum managers had 
existed then, the traveled individual 
would have been exhibited as a "freak." 
Now such a voyage is so common that 
we have c^wed to regard the world's cir- 
cumference of 2.5,000 miles as anything 
large. But distance can be measured in 
another way —by the difficulty and ex- 
pense of overcoming it. The Burlington 
system of railroads has 7000 miles of 
track. Do you realize what a lot of rails 
it would take to string out 14,000 miles 
in a single line? How much money they 
would costl" How many great cities and 
thriving towns you would pass in travel- 
ing that distance":' Buy a ticket over 
the finest railrod in the West, and in- 
vestigate. For information more in de- 
tail, call on any of the Burlington agents, 
or those of connecting lines, or write to 
W. J. C. Kenyon, Gen. Pass. Agent C, 
B. & N. R. R., St. Paul, Minn. 

"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" bound in appropriate finishings at 
The Herald bindery. 




R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 

s 1.- ^'*®!^'rS' ''^pairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 

,, kinds of furs a specialty. t&- Good workm x v 

ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



Purchasers for 




209 East Superior Street, 



Duluth, Minn. 




ill 



FOR SALE: 



AN ACROSTIC. 



a r|uce- 



940 13 
440 00 



»428.581 66 
74fl 88 

9,075 ;e 

974 28 
4,130 49 

879 55 

7S» 87 

316 
316 22 

341 68 
918 96 

293 37 
492 63 

931 78 
1,529 19 

560 rj 
1.038 42 



»95,.197 89 

234.710 10 

2S,101 64 

57,251 90 

8.080 50 



2,673 60 
6.916 96 



60 10 
HW 11 
866 42 

940 13 

(MO 13 
440 00 



1436.780 2!)| C9,590 66 



745 88 . . 
9,076 38 .. 

974 gsL 
4,130 4»|.. 



Total 
Indep't sch. dls. 

IxK-al mill 

Si>ecial tax . . . 

Building- 

Uuild'ir sink's 
State apporj, 
Co. apporttn't 
Sch'l. dis.. Park 
Point- 
Local mill 

Special ta.x... 
Stale appor't. 
Co. apportm't! 
School dis. \ol: 
Local mill... 
Special tax... 

Huilding 

ISuild'gri'tnk'g' 

State appor't. 

Co. apportm'tl 

School di9.No2: 

Local mill 

Special tax. .. | 

.'^tate appor't. 

Co. apportm't' 

School dls. No3: 

Local mill 

Si)eoial tax 

State app'mt. 

Co. app'mt.... 

School dis. No 4: 

Local mill 

Special tax. . 
Buildinff tax 
State app'mt 
Co. app mt . . . , 
School dis. No 5: 

Local mill 

Special tax. . . 
State app'mt. 

Co. app mt 

Schtxjidis. N06: 

Local mill 

Special tax. .. 
KuiidinKtax.. 
State app'mt. 
Co. app'mt. . . 
Sch<K)ldl9. No7: 

I>^)cal mill 

Special tax.. . 

State app'mt. 

Co. app'mt.. . 

School dig. No 8: 

Local mill 

Special tax . . . 
Kuilding- tax.. 
State app'mt.. 

Co. app rnt 

School di.s. No 9: 

Local mill 

Special lax.. 
Building tax.. 
Slate app'mt.. 

Co. app'mt 

School dis.No 10: 

liOcal mill 

Special tax... 
Buildingr tax.. 
State app'mt. 
Co. app mt. . .. 
School dl9.N0 11: 



122.774 57 

19,083 90 
66,328 06 
42.148 Hi 
6.788 43 
9,963 81 
1.108 76 



409 96 
1,080 93 

347 37i 

164 41' 
I 
3,2n 78 
3,897 54i 
2.967 701 
1.848 56 

381 39 
40 09, 



390 65 

729 87 . 

316 211. 

316 22i . 

341 681. 
918 96 . 

:so 39! 

479 0»| 

I 

614 85i 

1,0*2 06' 

660 72!. 
166 52 



To travel, or not to travel. Is for each 

tlon— but If we 
Have to ride behind the pufflntr iron horse, the 
Eiperience of all our friends advises us to 

choose "The 

Burlinirton," a line whose builders planned 

not a scheme 
l^toplan. By rare ^ood judgrraent guided, and 
Keadlnsr the sigrns of pro^re-s rljrhtlv. they 
Linked with bands of steel the cities chief 
In nine grrcat states (we div)p the mctrci— 
Nebraska. Kansas. Mis.sourl, Iowa, Minnesota 

Colorado, VVyominjT and South Dakota. 
Goest thou a j« urucy to any town In these? 

Then 
To thy ajfcnt hie thee, and buy thy tickets 
On "The BurlinKton," the finest, fastest line. 

and 
Never shalt thou have cause for vain regret. 

For rates, tickets, maps and any information, 
call on a»rentj< of "The Hurlinjflon" or con- 
nectiuK lines, or adJres.* W. J. c. Kenyon, (ien. 
Pass Agent, C , B & N. K. K., St. Paul. Minn. 

The Herald bindery has the Ijeet 
facilities in Diriuth for making blank- 
books. 

Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 
the market. W. A. Footk i Co. 



S"* 



50-]l--ln Hcfeage, - 
0-15-ln beaie. 
Superior Street 
Dock Property, - 



-J2, 



- I 



HARWOOD'S 

City Transportation Freight and Express, 

DRAYS. 

Office, 17 First Avenue West. 



Three Ifaluatle aod Nice-Lyiog Lots 




On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFrCE 

17 First Avenue West. 



Lots for sale as 
as $25 each. 



low 



BROWN 




R 



APPLY TO 



5 35 
8 17 

331 58 
5;r 80 



882 90 



(21.994 70 91.766 80 



19.083 '.<0 . 
65.388 05 . 
42.148 6:j . 

5,788 43 . 

9.V63 81 . 

1,108 76 . 



L«>cal mill. . 

special tax.. . 

Bulldinir tax. 

State app'mt. 

Co. app'mt.. . 
Schofjl dl8.No 12 

Tjocal mill 

Special tax. . . 

State app'mt. 

Co. app'mt 

School fu'd flues 

etc 

State app'mt. .. 
State school f'nd 



Commercial binding and 
ceives accurate and prompt 
The Herald Job Rooms. 



printing re- 
attention at 



Mendennall & Hooj>e8 have a quantity 
of money which they can loan iu small 
amounts at 6 per cent. Call and 
them before making your loan. 



S66 



Notice the new bargains offered 
M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



in J. 



Unitarian literature- furnished free 
upon application at lioom D, Hunter 
block. 



For Sale. 

A fine double corner in West Duluth; 
a great snap. Don't miss it. Apply to 

Ebicson <fc Stko.m. 
Room 211, Paatoret-Steneon building. 



Total. 



494 23 

578 64 

151 31 

74 

1.057 80 

1,011 83 

120 13 

64 21 

1.517 46 
323 30 

753 as 

40 15 

19 78 

617 

739 16 
39 34 
16 96 

708 69 
799 62 
96 
301 73 
147 26 

4x7 38 
.■MX 59 
1.^ 1 
63 71 

565 01 
570 30 
541 83 
119 48 
57 91 

888 72 
4,512 49 
1,746 12 
1,149 72 

130 46 

483 70 

645 18 

306 87 

.58 88 

25 74 

382 38 
17 52 
17 52 
43 30 
20 37 

608 11 

460 12 

184 30 

16 08 

1.969 92 

13.IJ87 :» 

1,316 78 



58 661 

174 08 

98 70, 

14 48 

2,270 25 
3,663 12 
2,922 16! 
1.836 35 
241 15 
104 02 

489 06 

620 88' 

122 43 

62 81 

1,053 63 

1,966 49 

66 65 

24 00 



1.656 79 
333 30 
763 32 

40 16 

19 

617 

729 16 
39 34 
16 96 

708 69 

799 68 

96 

301 73 

147 26 

491 24 

531 22 

148 40 
64 01 

570 87 
.564 99 
633 62 
1C7 58 
46 41 



351 :« 
90ti m 
248 67 
146 93 

33 45 
44 4;.' 
■35 54 
22 21 
313 14 
27 34 

24 63 

68 12 
116 6ti 
68 41 

31 07 

64 42 
104 38 
61 27 



Nature In Convulsion 
Is terrific. Volcanic eruptions, cyclones, 
earthquakes are awfully and tremend- 
ously picturesque, but scarcely desirable 
to emulate in action and effect bv the 
administration of reme<lies which pro- 
duce convulsion and agony in the ab- 
normal portion of the human frame. 
Such is the effect of the old fashioned 
violent purgatives happily falling more 
and more into disuse, and of which Hos 
tetter's Stomach Bitters is the whole- 
some, pleasant and far more effective 
succedaneum. They weakened the in- 
testines — the Bitters invigorates them. 
They left the bowels inactive, because 
incapacitated by ensuing feebleness. 
The Bitters, on the contrary, and be- 
cause it enables, not forces, them to act 
— a vast and fortunate difference— ^j)er 
petuates their activity and regularity. 
The liver is beneficially stimulated, as 
the kidneys also are, by this medicine, 
which easily conquers, also, malaria, ner- 
vousness and rheumatism. 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



o 



T 



H 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restaufants, 



—AND— 



-:- WILL B! SOLD M CHEIP -:- 



SPECIAL Bums. 



I 60 Acres, section 2-48- 



E 



R 



" 18-50 

" 12-50 

" 20-50 

" 26-50 

" 28-50-15. 

" 27-50-15. 

Dodge's addition, 



16. 

15. 
16. 
15. 
15. 



S 




OiQ rsC\ ^«t Set 
a>O.V/U "of Teeth. 



CULLUM, 

Painless Dentist. 



Room 1-7, 406 West Superior Street, 



P»rr'i««on RIoek 



Duluth 



SCHILLING'S ORCHESTRA 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 



320 
80 " 
160 •• 
70 " 
80 «' 
80 " 
Lot 2. block 30, 
$325. 
2 Lots, block 5, West End, $1050. 

We have exclusive sale of this proo- 
erty. 



TAKE NOTICE! 

We are agents lor the celebrated 

fan Point China 

The Best in the World. 



Got our prices and vou will 
f ectlj- satisfied . 



be per- 



IS West Superior Street. 



-ALSO- 



LAZIER BROS., 

26 Exchange BIdg. 



NEW HOTEL. 



-THE 



liraPOLITAI 



SPECIAL 



eHRGAINS 



Thiee Good Building Lots on itii StreetT 



Near Third avenue east 



ROOM 4U PASTOREI-STENSOK BLOCK, 

DULUTH, - . MINN. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 



MINNESOTA. 



918 74 
4,633 29 
1.74«66 
1.149 72 

130 46 

469 37 

630 -Si 

298 01 

22 U5 

4 12 

390 42 
17 62 
17 62 
44 62 
10 21 

H« U . 

460 12 . 

184 20 . 

Vi 09 . 

1,949 62 

13,UJ7 39 . 

1.318 78 



16 63 
33 53 
96 IT 

55 XT 

14 %- 
10 -ii 
8 21 
89 03 
62 22 



F rst class In every way. Newly refltte. 
Finest sample room in ujwn. Livery 1 
eoonectlon. WILI lAM GRANT, Prop. 

Open Noveilflber 



Cor. 



St. Paul, Minn., 

4th and Wanbingftoii St«. 



On Cable Car Line. Best Table iu the Noixu 
west. Itaies $3.00 au<] I {iwards. 

W. U. Babnvs. Manager. 



I. 



14 33 
14 95 

8 86 
36 84 
31 62 

11 19 



30 70 
18 02 



420 00 



$198,092 45i«195,964 44 «3..'i9« 68 



BBCAPITDLATION. 



State funds. .. 
County funds. 
City and villas 

funds 

Town funds... 
Sfhool funds. 

Total 

Add tax collec'd 

not upporti'ed 
State solnxil text 

books 



Totjil 

State text txjoks 
outstauding 



Total. 



t7ej9IS85 
164.488 86 

428,581 5« 
22.TT4 oT 
198,093 45 



$883,160 39 

41.867 63 

289 25 



•825,307 Vi 



1985,307 07 



•79,2US 86 
145,547 78 

428,770 29 

-'I,tf44 TO 

195,964 44 

$86(1.430 06 



Robert G. McDowel 

327 WEST SUPERIOR ST. 

GROUkO rLOOR, 

OPPOSITE ST. LOUIS HOTEL. 
Offers the following 

ACRES AND LOTS 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 

FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant place 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table is supplied and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



DLE.C. Wests 



-IN- 



630 46 
$870,060 62 



$870,050 62 



$71,099 1» 
9.590 56 
3.598 58 



$86,171 23 
41,867 53 



%\3r,SS» 76 
331 21 



$126,707 56 




For Sale. 

West half lot 70, block 175, 3d division, 
four-roomed house on the lot: only 8700, 
half cash, the remainder o your own 
terms. Apply at 211 Paatoret-Stenson 
Block. 



SUPERIOR 



500 Acres at Haywood Sta- 
tion, on line of Omaha, with 
800,000 feet of pine, at $7 
per acre; one-half cash. 

280 Acres in sections 4 and 
5, tp. 47, at $ I 7 per acre. 
2 Lots on West Sixth street. 

10 " •■ Eighth •• 

Block 7, West I 5th street. 
" 10 " " «• 

Block on East 23d street; 
very cheap. 

A dead shot, 80 acres in 
South Superior if taken at once. 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Rp<HHne for Hrntrrift, DtzzinesK, Fits, Neuraltrla. Wake 
fuliie-K, Mental Depression. Softenliii? of tlu' lirain re 
fultiiiif ill in^Aniiy and leadlnif to misery rtecav and 
ileath. Premature Old A»e, Uarrenneas. Loss ol Power 
in cither sex. Involuntary Losses, and fipermatoirho-a 
paused hv ovei-exortioii of the brain, belr-al)U>e or 
over-indiilgi-nce Each hoi contains one month's trcat- 
«'?."i^- •' «*'o». or Fix for tS, Pent tiv mail prepnid. 
with eaeh order for six l.oxe>., will ,<end pun ha-ser 
iTuarantee to refund money If the treatment falls to 
mre. Uuarantees issued au>l (fenuine Bold ouly l<y 

Boyce & Totman. Phoenix Drugr Store, and 
7 West Superior street, sole agents, Duluth. 
Minn. 



160 Acres in 9-49-15. 



80 



40 



320 



9-49-15. 



I -49- 1 5. 



35-48- 1 5. 



1 




i 


i 


i. 




\ 


i 


\ 


; 


* 




i 


'' 


« 


{ 


* 


^ 


' 


1 


1 


1 



48 



80 
-15. 



Water Front, 



2 Grand Avenue lots. 

2 Lots on Central Avenue. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $1750. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $1 180. 

I Cottage House, with 
well. West Duluth, $2000. 



All these are well located and very accessible. 
Good schools and graded streets close by. 



Apply by letter or in person to 



THE NORTHWESTERN LINE. 

C, ST. p., M. &0. RY. 

Take this line between St. Paul, Min- 
neapolis and Chicago, Duluth, Wash- 
burn, Ashland and all joints on Lake 
Superior, and to Sioux City, Omaha, 
Kansas City, Denver, Spokane Falls, 
Portland, and all jKjints west. 

"The Northwestern Line," C, St. P., 
M. & O. R'y, will also take you to the 
wheat fields of Dakota and Minnesota, 
the corn fields of Iowa and Nebraska, to 
the Black Hills and the wonderful oil 
and coal bearing districts of Wyoming. 

No line is so well equip|)ed for its pas- 
senger business, or gives more attention 
to the comfort and convenience of pas- 
sengers than "The Northwestern Line," 
nor does any other line make as good and 
reliable connections East, North and 
Southwest. With tourists, land-seekers 
or imigrants, in fact with all the travel- 
ing public, "The Northwestern Line" 
stands tirst. 

For map folder showing the line and 
connections, call at 159 East Third street, 
St. Paul, 3:12 Hotel St. Louis block, Du- 
luth, v.] Nicollet House, Minneapolis, or 
address T. W. TEASDALE, Gen'l Pass. 
Ag't, St. Paul, or G. M. SMITH, Gen'l , 
Ag't, Duluth. * 1 41 II 



Terms on Houses, 1-1 Cash, Balance 
], 2 and 3 years at 8 Percent 



a 



ED," 



H. P. MILLS, 



AND 4I] RBST lATIONilL BANK BUILDING. 



^ 



CuS^iBE] :Eg::F,T?. a t .t-i 



;, 



1^ 



O. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

Rooms 510. ill and 512. Dulutli llnioo national Bafll Buildlne. 



trr-r 



rrrr-rr 



f 



\ 





♦ ■■ *■ 



t 



I 




lil/JLUTH EVJfiNTEfG HEBAIiD: JANTJARY 28, 1890. 



WORLD OF COMMERCE. 



The Course of Wheat and 

Stock Prices for the Day 

on 'Change. 



Daily Receipts; Chicago Gos- 
sip; Close; Market 
Notes. 



The market was firm, with a good deal 
of strength underneath, but trading was 
small. There was a fair inquiry much 
of the time. Nearly all the prints of the 
day were in favor of higher prices. All 
American markets were stronger, cables 
were steady, and reported a better de- 
mand. The amount of wheat on pas- 
sage, however, showed an increase of 
1M,000 bu. 

Nothing was done in cash. No. 1 hard 
closed at 77 'g; No. 1 northern, 75^ 
•J northern, 73. January No. 1 
closed at 77^2 , No- 1 northern at 75 
both nominal. May No. I hard openeu 
at Si^g, the same as last night's close, 
held steady until about noon, then sold 
up to 82 "4, where it remained for the 
rest of the day and which was bid at the 
close. May No. 1 northern closed at 
79 \i. nominal. February corn closed at 
_ 2» and May at Sli^. 



CITY BRIEFS. 



No. 

hard 

1: 



Tbe Oailv Movement. 

Cars on track: Wheat 15. Receipts: 
Wheat, 4k^t bu; oats, 19,210 bu. In- 
spection: Wheat No. 1 hard, 10 cars; 
No. 1 northern, 9; corn, 9; oats 25; total, 
53, against 34 of whe^tt a year ago. Min- 
neapolis reported 150 cars against 204 
yesterday and 141' a week ago. Receipts 
there: Wheat, !<3,2.J0 bu. Shipments: 
Wheat, 10,080 bu; tiour, 17,869 bbls. 

Chicago Wheat. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of \V. \V. Bill, successor to 
Pressy, Wheeler Jb Lewis: 

Wheat: The bullish feeling was in- 
tensified today by the correction of the 
so-called special Washington report on 
the condition of winter wheat and by 
the news from California. It is now- 
stated that the condition of winter 
wheat should have been given at i.t5.3 
instead of 102.1, the latter percentage 
referring to acreage. A reliable Cali- 
fornia ^rain house wires that there must 
of necessity be a serious reduction in the 
acreage of the state in consequence of 
the Hoods, which not only destroyed fall- 
planted grain, but rendered replanting 
impossible. While the latter news must, 
of course, be taken with doubt, it had 
its affect on a market which was in shape 
to receive it kindly. Liet the bulls become 
enthusiastic and load up on bulges, then 
sell it to them. Weather scares are sure 
to come, and the bears will find plenty 
of hard spots to sell on. The close iJs 
strong at top prices. 

Provisions were weak early on heavv 
receipts of hogs at Western 'p'i°ts. but 
stiffened later on heaNy purchase of May 
pork Hutchinson. 



Frost & Peachy, the grooers, have re- 
moved their stock into their elegant 
new store in the Long building. E. C. 
Thurston, the well-known reetauranteur 
and caterer, has also moved into the ad- 
joining store in the same building. 

William Ward and John Johnson, two 
drunks, were fined the customary $5 
each this morning and being busted 
were obliged to join the snow-ahovelling 
gang. 

On Friday afternoon a mother's meet- 
ing will be held at the Bethel, and in 
the evening the regular meeting of the 
boys brigade. 

The y. W. C. T. U. will not hold the 
the usual meeting on Monday night on 
account of the Burdick lecture at the 
church on that evening. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's office. Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
17 above; 3 p. m., 27 above; 6 p. m., 24 
above; 10 p. m., 18^ above; 7 a. m.. 11° 
above; 9 a. m., 11 above; 12 m., 24 
alxjve. Maximum, 24 above. Mini- 
mum, 11 above. Daily range, 1.3^. 

Senator C. K. Davis has sent the 
Bethel several valuable books, including 
reports of the Ethnological bureau and 
the geological survey. 

P. A. Burdick talked to a big audience 
last night at the Bethel, especially for 
the young men, many of whom signed 
the pledge. 

"The Dark Secret," the greatest of 
tank dramas, holds Temple Opera the 
first four days of next week. 

The case of Hans Wannaboe, now in 
jail on the charge of bjistardy, preferred 
by Mary Martinson, will come up for 
trial Thursilay morning. 

Capt. of Police McLaughlin captured 
an inebriate who was making an exhibi- 
tion of himself on Superior street, and 
lugged him off to the city jail. 

The Sons of Veterans will hold an im- 
portant business meeting tonight. All 
should attend. 

The westerly breeze today, which al- 
most resembled a chinook wind in its 
effects, did more to clear Ihe accumu- 
lated snow from Superior street side- 
walks than a gang of men could have 
accomplished. 

Chief Hafey Kitisfactorily tested 1000 
feet of hose this morning with 150 lbs. 
pressure and shut off nozzle. 

.\n effort will be made to get the rail- 
road to give an e.xcursion to Duluth to 
the delegates to the National Builders 
association, now in convention at St. 
Paul. 



FROM WEST OOLOTH. 



News of The Shops and Fac- 
tories; First Cast at the 
Iron Bay. 



COME AND SEE US! 



Matters of General Interest; 

the Scandinavian 

Union. 



New York sitock^t. 

^ The following are closing prices on the 
New York stock exchange as reported bv 
W. W. Bill A Co.: 

Today. 

Chicapo. Burlln|rton& Quincy. 108S 

An, rton Oil 27\ 

Ml- ;ilc 'o\ 

>u.-, — ^ . ..cittc preferred ~b\ 

Chicinfo. Mtlwaokee Jc Si. Paul.. TOS 
Siurar Trust tM 



Gas Trust 

Louisville i Nasbville 

Cbicagt) i Nurthwestem 

Hock Uland 

Lake Sbure 

KeaiJintr , 

Teno. cwal and Iron 

Kichuond Terminal 

Atchison 

Delaware & Lackawanna, 

New EogUod , 

LeadTnist 

Weetern Lnion , 

Union Paciflc 

Wisconsin Central 

OU 



48 
■ ■ 90V 

.. r.H 

.lUS 

. ap 

. 2S'i 
. 33?, 

.ue 
. iS% 

. a6\ 

. 6»4 
. 33S 
■ 10ti>« 



yester- 
day. 
10 

To', 

m 

«?» 
111'. 

9rS 
lua 

39 

86", 
22 -a 
33', 

IStfi, 
45', 
284 
851^ 
68 
M\ 

106H 



The Minneapolis Close. 



MixsEAPOLls, Jan. *.— Closing quoUtions— 
wo. 1 bard, January, 78S; Februarj-. Tf'i; 
May, »1:<»: on track, T». No. 1 northern, 
Januai?. _76; February, 76»,; May. 79; on 
track, 77®.i^j. No. 2 northern, January, 7d^,; 
February 73',; May, 78',: on track, 73S(a75. 



Chicago Close. 

Chicago, Jan. S*— 1:1.5 p. m close-Wheat 
easy; Cash, 7.5 ^i: February, 75S; May 79S 
Com, ttrm; January, i?-, ; February, at^,: 
May. 31-^. ^ ^ 



N 



Special 3teetJnK of Co.ored Citizens on the 
.Mauifipal CainpaiKU. 
The colored citizens of Duluth will 
hold a mass meeting at the city hall to- 
morrow evening for the purpose of dis- 
cussing the political situation and mak- 
ing a choice of candidates for mayor and 
aldermen. The meeting is called by W. 
H. Bryan, Chas. Winner, L. W. Thorns, 
ex-policeman of St. Paul, and a number 
of others. The gentlemen earnestly 
hope to see a full representation of the 
colored people of the city at this meet- 
ing. 

Announcement, 

James Dingwall, the regular republ- 
can nominee of the First ward, was nom- 
inated for the two year term and Mr. 
Beattie for the one year term. Both 
have served in the council, Mr. Ding- 
wall for a full term, and Mr. Beattie to 
till out the unexpired term of Alderman 
Daily. Mr. Beattie was selected by his 
bretbren in the council itself. 



AN INTER ESTIN G ACTION. 

One That Will do Much Toward Settling 
the Prentice Claiui.- 
White & Keynolds. as attorneys for 
Owen Fargusson, have commenced an 
action against the Western Land associ- 
ation, Daniel G. Cash, Fannie Cash, W. 
P. Cash, Charles T. Cash, Agnes F. 
Hitchcock. W. W. Spalding, Ella Men- 
den ha 11, Frederick D. Prentice and 
Charles Mair, in which the plaintiff 
claims he is owner of an undivided one- 
quarter of all the tract in Duluth known 
as the tract "reserved for the proprie- 
tors," lying in the Second and Third 
divisions or the city. The land is valued 
at dl5,00t) and is stated to be entirely 
vacant. The plaintiflf demands a parti- 
tion of the property and that the title of 
Ella Mendenhall and F. D. Prentice, if 
they have any, be declared void aud of 
no effect and that said defendants be re- 
quired to disclose their interest in the 
land. 

REA L EST ATE. 

A Kecord of the Real Estate Transfers for 
24 Hour>i, Ending at Noon. 

W Swensou to Charles Johnson, w ', 1 

3:>*, Mk li5. Second ; 

John .^txion to David L Kellv, s4 of nw' 

^•4 h, and sc"'^* of ne"* lUti-l' 

John Lyons to David L Kellv, nw»i of 

neU it*, and is 5 and »5, 7-*e-lS .... 
T Sharp to C Peterson. 1 15.blk 2.Sharp's 

add 

Same to O. Bratt, 1 14, bik 2, same..! 
Same to A Haodin, I 7, bIkSi, same...... 

Same to F L Johnson, 1 B, blk 9, game . 
Same to P E Weisen, 1 U, blk J. same . 
Same to J L Gustafson, 1 13, blk 3. 

same 

fame to A P Gustafson, I i2, blk 2 

same 

L B Smith to W H Shlngler, is 21," 23, Z3, 

.U. ii, M, •.:. and *, blk 5, Kensington 

Plat-e . . 

Same to E L Lawton, 1 42, blk 2, same! ' 
Same to A A Simonton. 1 47, 48, blk 1, 

same 

Same to F A Silcox, Is 41, 42. 43. 44, 45! « 

47, 4^, blk b. Is L'l. 'i', Zi, 24. blk t!, same 
bame to F Lu«v ton. Is 40, 41, blk 2, same 
Same to J Kersley, 1 3y. 4(», 41. 42 4:) 44 

45. 4ti. 47. 4^-, blk 4; 1 4a, 44. 45. 4B. 47, 4«! 

blk 2, same 

Same to M S Stanford. 1 33, 34. 35, ai 

blk 5, same 

Same to 1 V Burdin, 1 31 and 3a! ' blk i 

e^ame 

W L Jackson to H H Hawkins! und >i of 

n ' J of ne^*, :W-50-15 

H H H iwkius to J E .Schultz, 1 96 and m, 

Hftli street, Foud du Lac 

C H Prior to H H Hawkins, 1 194, blk a< 

Second 

.Mary Lennon to H S Lord, 1 .334, blk 125! 

Second 

Joseph Mercier to Malvina Ji Palmer 

fr I 24, 2.-.. 26, 27. 2.«, 29. :»l. :n. blk ll! 

Hunters Grassy Point add 
A McGilUvray to M Palmer. 1 7. blk 127, 

Second 

C H Britts to D Stevensoii, 1 8, blk 10 

West Park 

D .\ Dunlap to J L Dow, I 424, blk 85. 

Second 

Ulrlck Haniio to John Diora! 1 34! blk 16, 

Hunters Grassy Point add . 
NHuletltoJ S Hoomer, lot 99. Lake 

avenue. Lower Duluth 

Heniy Dietrich to E L Bradley, nv," of 

se''4, 3, and w', of sw^^, 2-«6-2iJ . . . 
D Hanna to C Cosman, 1 15, blk 4. Lon- 
don 

J Gulbrandon to C Johnson, w^i of 

sw't, 9-49-15 

Inez A Calki.s to W A Abbott! 1 i! blk 
, 3H Kimberley * Strykers. . .^. * 
J Colby to E P. Patterson, lands in 

6s)0-13 



l.StOO 
560 
400 

300 

3UU 

(too 

000 
300 

300 

.«0 



1.300 
150 

300 

1,800 
300 



2,400 
600 
300 

1,400 
300 

2.0W 
1 



1.000 
250 
700 
I 
300 
30 
.'jOO 
750 
2S0 
200 



The Scandinavian union will give a 
masquerade ball in the Johnson block 
Friday evening. This is a national or- 
ganization, of which a branch was re- 
cently established here with a member- 
ship of about forty. Although there 
are a number of branches established in 
Wisconsin and other Western states, 
Wsst Duluta claims the first in Minne- 
sota. The objects and benefits of the 
society are similar to Odd Fellowship 
and other secret societies. The ball is 
for the benefit of the new organization 
and promises to be one of the most suc- 
cessful ones of the season. 

Miss Kate Fleming, the stenogra- 
pher at the can works,started the first tire 
in the new furnace yesterday afternoon. 
West Duluth was well represented at 
the performance of "Zig Zag" last even- 
ing. 

The mother of A. C. Smith is very sick 
at Duluth. 

W^ F. McKay, the real estate man, 
will move his office to the Palladio 
building. 

R. P. Grogin has established a real es- 
tate office in the same building with S. 
G. Whiteman. 

Ed. Warner wdl drive a sleigh load of 
young people to Duluth this evening to 
attend the second performance of "Zig 
Zag" at Temple Opera. 

The firm of Smith Jt Anderson will 
dissolve partnership in the spring and 
Frank Nelson will succeed to the inter- 
ests of Mr. Anderson, .\mong several 
changes to be made will be the introfluc- 
tion of a bar in the room now used for 
confectioneries, and the a bowling alley 
in the room below. 

G. W. Barnes has completed sound- 
ings in the bay for the West Duluth 
Land company. Investigation extended 
to the depth of thirty feet below the 
bottom of the bay and the soil was found 
in a condition favorable for the, work of 
dredging for the new docks. 

The committee of the Society of 
Christian Endeavor will make their re- 
port at the general business meeting to- 
morrow evening. 

The first cast was made at the Iron 
Bay works today. 

Capt. Sharp in a letter to his nephew 
agitates the question of tapping Midway 
creek and conducting the water to West 
Duluth. 

The Washington hotel,recently op ened 
is already crowded with boarders and 
additional rooms will soon have to be 
secured. 

The i)enal sign has been torn off the 
north end of the Central avenue bridge 
and Duluth sports are said to be in the 
habit of driving over this crossing at a 
furious rate. The attention of the 
authorities is called to the matter. 

R Maegher, an employe of the Iron 
Bay company, arrived from Marquette 
Saturday, and moved into one of the 
brick cottages on Broadway. 

O. K. Balstadt, the butcher, has opened 
a meat market at Tower. 

L. R. Mayo has about concluded his 
arrangements for openinjr a first-class 
barber shop in Phillips hotel, in the room 
recently occupied by O. C. King. He 
will probably move his furniture in the 
last of the week. 

If subscribers of The Herald should at 
any time fail to receive their paper regu- 
larly, they will please send a postal to J. 
O. Hancock, Phillips hotel, and the mat- 
ter will be attended to. 



It will pay you I 



Never before in Duluth 
opportunity to buy 



have you had the 



Fine Hats and Men's Furnishings 



At such lovt^ prices as we are quoting this 
See our east window — full of the best- 



week. NECKTIES! 
All to close out. 



KILGORE & SIEWERT 

ST. LOUIS HOTEL BLOCK, DULUTH. 
Store closes at 6:30 P. M. 



L O A NS _M A D E 

6 AND 7 PER CENT. 

MONEY ON HAND NO DELA-Y. 

JONES -:- & -:- B RACE, 

Real Estate and Loans, 
FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 




4^. 



"»> 



'ZuM 




409 



KEEP RIGHT ON GUESSING. 



Seventy-five Dollars Cash to 
Closest Guessers 
Duluth. 



on 



Two Prizes Offered for the 

Contest; from Now to 

May. 



See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. Macfarlane & Austin. 



PERSONAL. 



.500 



It Was Not. 

To tne Editor of The Herald. 
The morning News says, talking of 
last night's West End meeting: 

John Lundt)erg. the uptown saloonkeewr 
tried Xa create excitement for Shaw and failed. 

Now I did not fail. The S<:andina- 
vians present endorsed what I said. I 
did not attempt to run down Hall or any 
other man but 1 did praise Shaw and he 
deserved praise. My remarks were en- 
dorsed by the feelings of the Scandina- 
vians present. JOH.N LUXDBEKU. 

Mendenhall A; Hoopes have a large 
list of Oneota property which they can 
sell at a ijargain. Call and see them be- 
fore making your purchase. 

The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptlv 

J. A. Boggs offers profitable invest- 
ments in Superior. This property will 
double In six months. 



SUPERIOR REAL 
Trannfers 



ESTATE. 
County 



the 



Filed in Uouglas 
Past 3 4 Hours, 

Furnished by W. W. Stanford & Co., abstract- 
ors of titles for Douglas county, Wlk.iW^S 
Norris-McUoujrall block, Duluth. 

Furnished by W. W. Sanford i Co abstnu-t- 
Hoom 3, Norri.v.McDougall block. '-^""^y- 

Luther Mendenhall to John A Watter- 

worth und '/, of n ' i of se!,. 15-4«-1.3 f 1 

John A Watterworth to C C Whitney 

n' . of sei-4, l.-,-4K-13 '• 5 8,,,, 

i^V}^ t' ML-rrlam to Elizabeth B ' ^i^. 

ford 1 Si, 34, blk 40. South Superior 

r irsi 



South Superior Improvement coin'pan 

to Byron T Kan' -" ' - 

Superior, First 



'I 



1,000 



750 



6,400 
5.S00 



If you want to build in Endion con 
Bult J. M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



Aionzo J Whiteman to Sprague Snlvei y 
eS. .ti-tO-lo ■" 

George L Kobins to Nancy Wiillii^^'i 1 
-, J. 4. ;,, b!k ;).H, .-^uiKTior City . . ..\. ' 

A eiander H .Morri.son to W W Dwyer 

w \ "« ^' ^V^"' ^- 8u|H?rior City ' 2.OOO 

>«iT.J^.'""".''U',* to E H Iiauk^l4«9. ' 

John H Hammond Uj Francis A Wat 

&'dVd•.::•.*:.!'.^^"^«r!^.':-« -.000 



Acres. 

Two acres in southeast corner swii 
sec. lo-50-14. *' 

Five acies, sec. 13.50- 14. 
SW,'4 of nw>4, sec. 7-50-13. 

E. W. Mark ELI,. 



Mr. James E. Heg of Lake Geneva, 
Wis., the newly-appointed immigration 
inspect<ir for Duluth has arrived. 

Government Inspector Chalk returned 
yesterday with his daughter from a long 
trip to Boston, New York, loronto and 
other Eastern cities. 

Mr. Neil McLachlan returned last 
evening from St. Augustine, Fla. Mr. 
McLachlan has enjoyed his Southern 
winter greatly. 

A distinguished party of New York 
business men took dinner at The Spald- 
ing last night, the guests of R B. C. 
Bement and S. M. C<»ry of the Duluth 
Gas k Water company. The guests were 
Theodore Roosevelt, R. S. Belknap, New 
York; A. M. PattLson, Waterloo; W. H. 
Getard, Poughkeepsie; T. H. Weeks, 
West Superior. 

Mr. Frank Burke returned yesterday 
from Baltimore and Washington. 

Mr. Tom Martin, son of Judge E. P. 
Martin, and a printer, is very seriously 
ill at St. Lukes hospital. 

Mr. R. H. Hartley of Minneapolis, 
brother of G. f ;. Hartley of this city, is 
registered at The Spalding. 

Archie McKenzie, advance agent of 
the "Dark Secret" company, is in town. 
Mr. M. Prankle of St. Paid, is in 
town. 

Mr. G. E. Poster, the Oil Citv million- 
aire and wife, are guests at T^he Spald- 
ing. Mr. Foster Is one of the heaviest of 
Duluth 's non-resident property owners. 
Mr. J. T. Gregory, ex-Indian agent, is 
inthe city. 

Mrs. Ci E. Shannon was a passenger on 
this morning's Omaha, en rOute for a 
winter's stay in Barton, Fla. 

Miss Murray, niece of M. S. Burrows, 
left this morning for a visit to her home 
in Pennbrooke. Ont. 



[Notice that all city letters put in the 
Duluth postoflice must have two cents 
prepaid, otherwise The Herald will not 
receive the guesses, for it will not pay 
postage on "guess" letters.] 

How many inhabitants has Duluth ? 
That is a question for the readers of The 
Herald to answer. By "Duluth" is meant 
the city proper, West Duluth, Lakeside 
and Lester Park, all to all intents and 
purposes jmrts of the city. 

The Herald proposes to make it an 
object for its readers to guess as to the 
number of people in the city and the 
three adjoining suburbs mentioned 
above. In brief. The Herald will offer 
prizes to the two persons guessing the 
number or nearest the number of 
inhabitants shown by the returns 
of the census enumerators. The Herald 
wdl give to such successful guessers two 
cash prizes, 

First Priste $.<>0 in Gold. Second Prize $35 
in Gold. 

Guesses will be received at this office 
until the day when the enumerators of 
the census begin their work. 

Population Contest Coupon. 

My gruess as to the number of inhabitants : 
: in Duluth. West Duluth, Lakeside and ■ 
: Lester Park to be shown by returns of the ■ 
; census enumerators in the summer of ItsOO • 
: is as follows : 

: Whole nnmber of Inhabitants- 



Name of gneiwer- 



Mortgage Sale. 



o 
o 

q: 

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Residence of ^uesser — 



Date, Jan. %», 1890.- 



Cut out this coupon, make your guess uixin 
it and send it to Tlie Daily Herald. All guesses 
must be made on iliis coupon. Only one guets 
allowed to a single coupon, but you can buy as 
many pap<'rs as you want, day after day. and 
guess on the coupons therein contained as 
often as you please. In case then- shal 
Ik' two or more answers of the same number 
which number is nearest or next to nearest 
that returned by the enumerators, then the 
winners shall be. In either case, the ones whose 
coupons bear the earliest date. 

Address all answers to 

"Onxss " care The Dally Herald. 
Duluth, Minn. 



WHEREAS, ON THE fVru DAVOF JANtJ- 
ary, IKWt, Luolla P. Bliss and Aaren S. 

Bliss made, executed and delivertMl to John D. 

Howard their certain mortgage l>cariiig <liite 
on ^aid day and tiled and recorded in the office 
ot tlie regi.*ler ot deeds of the county of St. 

Ix)uisaud sUte of .Minnesota in book Zl of 
mortgages, on page 514, on the lOtli dny of 
January, l.SMi, at J r^Op. m., which mortgage was 
given to secure the nayuieut of six thousand 
dollars and interetit. according to the cundi- 
tiousof three promissory notes payable as folj 
lows: One for two thousand dollars, payable iu 
one year Iromjsaiddato; one for two tliousand 
dollars, payable In two years from said date, 
and one tor two thousand dollars, payable in 
three yeai-s from said date, with interest on 
said sums at the rate of .h pir cent per annum 
payable semi-annually till fully paid; and 

Whereas, It was provided and stipulated In 
and by said mortgage that if default should be 
nuule in the pa> meut of said sum of money or 
interest or any part there<jf at the time and in 
the manner in said mortgage specitted for the 
pay incut tlicreol, the said mortgagee was 
autliurlzed and empowered to sell tlie mort- 
gaged premises liereinafterdeserilied at public 
auction, and convey the same to the purchaser 
m lee simple, agreeably to tlie staiuU- in such 
case made and provided, and out of the monies 
arising from such sale to retain the principal 
and interest then due on the said mortgage 
and notes, together with all costs and charges, 
and also the sum of fifty dollars as attorney's 
fees, and pay the overplus, if any, to the mort- 
gagor.-*, their heirs, executors, administrators 
or a.ssigns; and 

Whereas, default was made in the payment 
of the sum of two thousand dollars principal, 
and Interest on six tliousand dollars at the rate 
of eight i>ercent per annum from theMh day 
of July. IS'it, which Ixjcaaie due and payable 
on the Sth day ol January, lt*!MJ, now amounting 
to the sum of two thousand two hundred and 
foriy-seven (il-lOU dollars (*£.*47.eM, which is 
claimed to bo due and payable on said mort- 
gage at the date of this notice, and no action 
or protwding at law or otherwi.se having bi>en 
Instituted U) recover the debt secured by said 
mortgage or any part thereof, and no part 
thereof having been paid save the Interest on 
said mortgage to the eighth day of July, !.•*(*»: 
Now, therefore, notice is hereby given, that 
by virtue of said power of sale and pursuant 
to the statute in such c.»se made and provided, 
the suld mortgage will lie lorcclost-d and the 
premises described in and covered by the said 
mortgage, viz : The tracts or r arc-els of land 
lying and being in the county of St. Ix>uls and 
state ot Minnesota, to-wit : Lots two hundred 
and si.\ty-nine (:ii.1i) and two hundred and 
seventy-one (271) on Lake avenue In Upper 
Du uth, ac«)rdlng to the plat of said town ot 
Duluth, recorded in the office of the register of 
deeds in said St. Louis eouuly. with the 
hereditaments and appurtenauci-s. will be sold 
at public auction to the highest bidder for 
cash to pay the said debt and intertjst and fifty 
dollars attorney's fees, stipulated in t>y said 
mortg go In case of foreclosure, and the dis- 
bursements allowed by law, whicli sale will be 
made by the sheriff .>f said St. Lonis c-ountv 
at the fn)nt door of the county court house. In 
the city of Duluth. In the county and state 
al\jresaid. on the lAth dav of March. IHltu. at 
ten o'clock of the forenoon of thai day, subject 
to redemption at any time within one year 
from the day- of sale, as provided by hiw. 

Dated at Duluth, January ;»th, Is-U 

John D. Howard, 

WM. B. PHKt.,..s. Mortgagee.. 




OyR GREAT SraiFICE SIILE 



Will continue Fifteei Days— until stock is re- 
duced. Cost or wcrth cuts no figure WE 
MUST REDUCE, even at a great loss. 
Our low prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business Existence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock ; besides, 
you would not stop to read them, but will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

$7.49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ I 5, 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least $ I 8. 

The same reductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishing Goods. No reserve We must reduce 
our stock at least $£5,000 (thirty -five thousand 
dollars.) Mild weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us to^take the loss. Call and see 
our prices. 



M. S. BUILROWS & CO. 



o 
o 

id 

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a 

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D 




HBTICLK OF mCORPOeilTION 



— OF THE— 



DULUTH REALTY INVESTMENT 



ASSOCIATION. 



Attorney. 
Jan. 2», Feb. 4, 11, IN 35, March 4. 



Certificate of Amended Arti- 
cles of Incorporation of the 
Duluth Incline Railway Com- 
pany. 



In order to become a corporation under and 
by virtue of the laws of the State of Minnesota 
in such case made and provided, the under- 
signed have adopted and executed the foUow- 
articles of Ineort oration : 

AKTICLE I. 

The name of this corporation shall be the 
Duluth Realty Investment Association, and its 
princiiial place of business shall l)e In the city 
of Duluth, Minnesota. 

ARTICLE U. 

Tlie general nature of Its business and object 
shall be buying, owning, improving, selling, 
leasing and dealing in lands, tenements, henjd- 
itaments and such otlier business as naturally 
pertalns to its principal object aforesaid. 

ARTICLE III. 

This corporation shall begin on February the 
flrst, IWKI, and shall continue thirty years. 

ARTICLE IV. 

The amount of the capital stock of the cor- 
poration shall be one hundred thousand dol- 
lars, divided into five thousand shares of twen- 
ty dollars each, to be piiid in monthlv install- 
ments «»f fifty cents per share and" at such 
times and under such regulations as may be 
prescribed by the by-laws: but said association 
may transact business and go into operation 
when one thousand shares shall havt> been sub- 
scribed foi- and taken. The Board of Directors 
shall have power to Issue said shares from time 
to time as they may decide by resolution, 

ARTICLE V. 

The highest amount ot Indebtedness which 
said assoc-lation shall *t any time incur shall 
be fifty thousand dollars. 

AKTICLE VI. 

The names and places of residence of the In- 
corporators of the salJ association are as fol- 
lows: 

Samuel C. Ma.xwell, Duluth, Minn. 
Simon Clark. Duluth, Minn. 
William S. Albertson, Duluth. Minn. 
John K. Shaw, Duluth, Minn. 
Samuel T. Harrison, Duluth, Minn. 
Robert Crombie, Duluth. .Minn 
Alexander M. .Morrison, Duluth. Minn. 
Zadok H. Austin, Dulutli, Minn. 

ARTICLE VII. 




Sixteenft Semi-Hnnual Red Pigufe Sale. 

BOY8' AND CHILDREN'S CLOTHING. 



th^.v^^V®*^"!"'' '^ *7*'^'"g- stronger and more carefully-made clothine than 
the.r fathers, fo-. as the mothers well know, the little fellows Rive their ear 

tTe?r ?im% o^.' r^l *'r 'l^f^'"' «^P«^'-^"y these days, when thTboylspend a 
theirt me outsi.e of school houses coasting. Our Boys' ClothinR .s thorouehlv 
»hnu? tf / "]f"^ ^'■°'" wear-resisitngfabrTcs. and will stand lo^s of knocking 
IaLE aVpR'f^ORlrUQ" S'^V^^'"" "'°'''^^' ^"'^ "°^ that our RED FIGUrI 
EVER PROGRESS our always reasonable PRICES ARE LOWER THAN 



Boys' and C^hildren's Overcoats 



^ We are able to offer sot»e big bargains 

a: now is our clearing up time. We've put prices on them that 



in Overcoats, 

will surely make them move^ 



Kouths and Men's Clothing at Red Fipre Prices. 



'\ 




3i^i/m 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 




Ill TB; mGHT DIRECTION AND yOU WILL MlKE^tJONEY. 



H 'V S«rve as a Guide. 

In order to give data that is of Interest and 
may be of value. The Herald rc-prints the fol- 
lowing from the directory reprirt of ItW, but 
it must be remembered that this paper does 
not vouch for th<? accuracy of the opinions set 



STATE OF .MINNESOTA, ( 
Cou.NTY or St. Louis, f 

KNOW ALL MEN BY 
That we 



a\s'i!;;nS-^fe„ii«Ei; S5!x?« ?^e'S??5sks;15 



well to recollet.-t that the ordinary dirf>etory 
figures and estimaies ore most aiwaysOpadded 
sometimes fearfully, and must usually In- 
scaled down %ery materially. These are the 
directory statements: 

This volume contains 3,:in9 more names than 
the last issue: a total of lti.:Mi adult citizens of 
Duluth: this sum multiplied by ■i\, the factor 
which has been found U) truthfully represent 
the women anu children not include*! in tlie 
list. Indicates a iMipulation of 4tl,'.*a) for Du- 
luth, a gain of lu.dini inhabitants within a year, 
and the prediction is ventured that If a lu" 
complete and accurate count Ivj made 
i>eriencetl and competent canvassers, 
«1,000 souls will bo found within 
rate limits of Duluth lu IH90. 

Population by Years. 

18S0. United States census.. 

1885, state census 

ISJ^ directory estimate 

lfW7, directory estimate 

1888, directory estimate 

188H, directory estimate 



_. THESE PRESENT.-^, 

rr — , , -„ -• J"**^** K. Mvers, president, and 
Benjamin h. Myers, secretary of the Duluth 
Incline Hallway Compauy.orgunlzed and doing 
business under the laws of the State of Minni»- 
.Hota. beingdulyaiid severally sworn, do hereby 



the 



by ex- 
nearly 
corpo- 



3,470 

18,0(111 
22,(KJ0 
30,U«I 



of the iHwrtI of directors ot the Duluth Incline 
Hal way Coiiipany,hcld at the compauy's oilice 
iu the Roardof Trade building. Duluth, Minne- 
sota, on the sixth (ti) day of November, 18Wt, at 
ten (10) o'clock in the loreiuxjn, it was resolved 
that the name of the Duluth Incline Hallway 
Company be changed to the Duluth Rclt Line 
Railway C"ompauv,and that Article 'I" (one) of 
the .\rli.les of IncoriKjratlon of the Duluth 
Incline Railway Company be changed and 
amondiHl by inserting therein the words, "Du- 
luth Belt Line Railway Company," In lieu and 
stead of the Words, "Duluth Incline Railway 
Cotnpany. "so that\be said article shall read :.8 
follows : 

ARTICLE 1. 



Nortlieni Paciflc Short Line. 

DULnTH TO airpEiuoR. 



Except Sunday. .. 
Except Sunday. .. 
Except Sunday.. 

Dally 

I»aily 

Except Sunday... 

Dally 

Daily 

DaUy 

Daily 

DaUy 

Except Sunday. . . 

Daily 

Dally 

Dally 

Except Sunday... 



Leave 
Dulutb 



Leare 
W, Sup'r 



Arrive 
Su perior 



«3U am 
736 am 
866 am 

10 00 am 

11 .36 am 
1 10 pm 
216 pm 
3%pm 
330 pm 
4 00 pm 
4<% pm 

6 40 pm 
«46pm 

7 15 pm 
9 ai pm 

11 10 pm 



« 46 am 
7 &o am 
9 10 am 

10 16 am 

11 60 am 
128 pm 
2.10 pm 
3 40 pm 

3 45 pm 

4 15 pm 
4 60 pm 

6 66 pm 

7 00 pm 
7 30 pm| 
9 46 pmj 

U27pm| 



t>&2 am 
HUSam 
9 17 am 

10 22 am 

11 •'>7 am 
136 pm 
237 pm 

3 47 pm 

4 26 pm 
♦ 67 pm 
«02pm 
T07 pm 



115 3 pm 



PlEEe FUEL CO. 



WKATHKR FORKCAST. 

Jan. 28. —Forecast for Duluth and 
vicinity for 24 hours commencinq 10 a.m. 
today : warmer ; fair weather. 

Observer, Signal OflBce. 



K«al Estate aud Insurance, 

If you wish to invest in real estate or 
insure your prope-ty, call and see iMen- 
denball A Hoopes, as they have the 
largest list of real estate and write in- 
surance in the Iwst companies repre- 
sented in the f'iiv. 



Highest of all in Leavening Power,,— U. S. Gov't Report, Aug. xy, iS8$^ 



COAL 



CROSS CR[[K LEHIGH, 

FREE BURNINC. 

miHRIlClIE 4 BIIUMIXOUS, 



The corptirate name of the corporation shall 
be "Duluth Helt Line Railway Company • The 
general nature of its business shall bo to sur- 
vey. Kx-ate, construct, eoulp. maintain, oper- 

—•,," : I »te and run a railway, with oiie-or more tracks 

°i'^\ I i>r lines ot road, with ail necessary side tracks, 

»'.«« turn-outs, branch lines and all necessary ma- 
chine shops, warehouses, storehouses, eleva- 
tors, depots, station houses, factories, build- 
ngs, structmes, right of way, depot grounds, 
lands and appurtenances necessary or con- 
venient tor the equipment, management and 
0|K.<ratIon of such railway, which shall com- 
mence at a iKjInt within thelimitsof the vill- 
age of West Dulutb, in the county of Saint 
Louis and State of Minnesota, and run In a 
general northwesterly direction to a point in 
the northeast quarter of section eleven (U) 
township forty-nine (49) n-rtli of range fifteen 
(15) west of the fourth (4th) principal meridian 
in said county of Saint Louis and State of 
Minnesota. The principal place of transacting 
business of the corporation shall be at Duluth. 
In the County of Saint L<}uis In the state of 
.Vlinnesota. 

Signed. 
„ Jacob R. Mvkiis. 

Benjamin P. Myebs, President. 

Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before mo this Iflth 
day of January, INm. 

S, M. Cha.ndlkk, 
rvT * _! 1 ., „ Notary Public, 

[Notarial seal] St. Louis County, Minn. 



The government of this association shall be 
vested in a Board of eight Directors and the fol 
l()W'ing otlic-ers to be chosen by the said board 
ot directors from among themselves: Presi- 
dent, vice-president, secretary, treasurer and 
"twrney. The terms of office of such officers 
shall be equal to their terms as directors. The 
iMwrd of directors shall be divided into three 
classes, the first, two. and the second and 
third classes, three each. Tlie term of office of 
the first class shall l)e one year; the second 
two years; and the third, three years. Upon 
the expiration of the terms of any of the di- 
rectors their successors shall l>e elected for a 
term of three years bv the stockholders at a 
regular annual moeting. The Board of Direct- 
ors shall have full power to transact und man- 
age the affairs of said corporation; imposiiur 
reasonable fines, fees, assessments anci dues 
upon its memU-rs; regulating the subscrip- 
tion, issue, and transfer of stiwk and the man- 
agement and investment of its funds. If they 
deem it advisable they may, by resolution re- 
(lune two dollars to be paid as the flrst install- 
ment on each share of stock subscribed for and 
taken m the first eeries. And If they deem it 
advisable tliey may in similar manner reiiuire 
twodollars on each share to be paid as the first 
installnient for any subsequent series. The 
tollowiug named iiersons shall constitute the 
first Board of Directors: 
First Class— 

Zadok H. Austin, 
Robert Crombie. 
Second Class- 
Simon Clark, 
William S. Albertson. 
Samuel C. Maxwell. 
Tldrd Class- 
Alexander M. Morrison, 
Samuel T. Harrison, 
John K. Shaw. 

And until their successors shall have qnali- 
fliM the lollowing named persons shall be the 
officers ol this asi^ociation : 

President, John K, Shaw. 

Vice-president, Samuel C. Maxwell. 

S<>crelary, Zadok H. Austin. 

Treasurer. Robert Crombie. 

Attorney, Samuel T. Harrison. 

Other meetings of the stockholders may be 
held at .such time and place as may be pre- 
scribed by the by-laws. 

In witness whereof we have hereunto set our 
A "I?* ?JJii ^'"*''* *'''"• *ltteenth day of January 

A. D., 18iH), 

I n presence of 

G. F..Mackenzi£, witness. 
A. t. Wii,8o.N-, witness. 

Samuki. C. Maxwell [Seal. 

Simon Clark Seal. 

William S. Albertson Seal. 

John K. Shaw [seal 

Samukl T. Harkiso.v tseal. 



1 HAVE IH[M 



HERE IS A SAMPLE I 

Southwesi quarterof northwest quarter Section 
18-50-14, $130 per acre. Land within 1-4 
mile sold about 6 months ago for $225 per 
acre and held now at $300 per acre. The 
buildingof the Incline Railroad by the High- 
land Improvement Co. will make this land 
wo-' h $200 per acre. 



HERE'S ANOTHER. 

Southeast quarter Section I 5-50- 1 5 at $40 per 
acre. Acres in Northeast quarter Section 
I 4-50- 1 5 just sold for $65 per acre. 



'/ 






|WOOD 



Dry Maple, 

Hard Mixed, 

!Slabs, 

K4i|rings. 



I am offering a few good bargains in 

residence lots near where the liourinj,' 

mills are to be built. J. A. Botics, " 

3o FarguBon Building 



Notice the new bargains offered 
M. Root & Cio.'s ad. 



in J, 




Bd(ing 
Powder 



ABSOLUTEUir PURE 



CmiElLSIIlU 
lid CIS HOUSE. 



COKE 



OBD[eS PBOMPTLy OELIKEefO 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, ( 
Depakthknt ok 8t.\te. f 

I hereby certify that the within instrument 
was tlkMl for record in this olllce on the 17th 
day of Jaiuiary, A. D. 18W), at 11 o'clock a. m., 
and was duly recordo<l in Book Y of iuoorpora- 
tlon on page 2»7. 

H. Mattson, 

Secretary of State. 



ROBKRT CROMBIK 
A. M. M0RI80N 

Zadok E. Austin 



,;seal 
Seal. 
Seal. 



STATE OP MINNESOTA. I 

CouNTv OK St. Louis. (**' 

On this 15th day of January, 1890, l>efore me 
personally appeared Samuel T.Mnvwoll, Simon 
Clark, William 8. Albertson, John K. Shaw 
Samuel T. Harrl.son, Robert Crombie, A. M 
.Morrison, Zadok H. Austin, to me well known 
to be the persons who executed the foregoing 
Instrument und each scknowlcdged that they 
executed the same as their free act aud deo<l 
[SEAL.] Gkoroe if. Mackknzik, 

Notary Public, St. Louis County. Minn. 



SOME spe:cial bargains 

LUTH PROPER. GALL 



IN LOTS IN 
OR WRITE. 



DU. 



Office: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Superior St. 

YARD 

Superior Street and 
third ave. 



. ea*t. 



DOCK: 

Qarfield Avenur 
Rices Point. 



OFFICE or RKGISTKK OF DEEDS. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, ( . 
County OF St. Loi.'is. jf"*- 

I hereby certify that the within amended 
arllcle was filed In this otHoe for record on the 
aith day of January, A. I>. IWki, at 4 o'elock p. 
m., and was duly recorded in Rook E of Mis- 
oellaneous, page 144. 

Amos Sbepiiard, 

Register of Deeds. 
Ry J. A. SwANSON, 

Deputy. 



OFFICE OF KEOI.STER OF OEJKDS. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, I 
County OF St, Louis. f""- 
I hereby certify tliat the within articles were 
filed in this office for record on th(^ 17th day of 
January, A. D. ISMU, at 8 o'clock a. m., and 

was duly recorded In Rook E of Miscellaneous 
page 140. 

Amos Shephard, 
Register of Deeds. 
By J. A. SWANSON, 
Deputy. 



MONEY TO LOAN I * 

MORTGAGES BOUGHT I 

NO OELAY— MONEY ON HANOI 



Applications wanted at once, especially for 
$500, $800, $ I 000, $ I 500, $2000, $2400. 





STATE OF .MINNESOTA. I 
Department OF State, t' 
I hereby certify that the within instrument 
wiisflledfor rcHJord in this office on the 24th 
day of January A. D. 1890, at U o'clock a 
m., and was duly recorded in book Y of incor- 
porations on page Xi&. 

H. Mattson, 
Secretary of SUte. 



Stryker, Manley & Buck. 



FIRiJT NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 




""■■WT 







V;^ - ^r : 



< » 




< 


A 


Lot on 


Central Avenue, 


in 


Block 


II, for $3300, 


for a few days 




E 


C. HOLLIOAY, 

Hotel St. Louis BIdg. 



DULUTH EVENING HERALD. 



A large list of Endion division 
lots chea^}. 

E. C. HOLLIDAY, 

326 W. Superior Street. 
HOTEL ST. LOUIS BUILOINQ. 



VOL. 7; NO. 256. 



DULUTH. MINN.. WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 29, 1890. 



PBIC£ THREE CENTS. 



YES, VOTE! 



LAST [D 




You 



can't vote too often for a good candidate, (because they 
won't let you), but don't let a bargain run right under 
your nose and not notice it. 



NEWS FHd WASHINGTON 



Arguingthe Sault Bill With the 

House Committee 

Today. 



1 



WF HAVE IT; COi, SNATCH IT 



^^ 



To 



Improve the Red River; 
Wants $75,000 for 
Reds. 



Other Fresh News from 
National Capital for 
a Day. 



the 



I 




■^N 



ACRES 

FHt LEVEL 



ALL BIG BARGAINS! 



I 



•t-r 



The Acres LIE 



but WE will 
Call and we 



STAND by the above statement, 
verify them. 



Wll 



Washington, Jan. 29.— Col. C. H. 
Graves of Duluth and ex-Congressman 
Seymour of Sault Ste. Marie, testified be- 
fore the house river and harbor commit- 
tee totJay regarding the needed improve- 
ments on the Sault canal. Col. Graves 
has an idea that if a special appropria- 
tion for the improvements is not made, 
the agitation will result in something 
being added to the river and harbor bill 
for the benefit of the Sault. 

The delegation wasjncreased by Geo. 
H. Ely of Cleveland and expatiated upon 
the importance of the improvements and 
their bearing upon the commerce of the 
great lakes. They remonstrated against 
the ijontinuation of the old policy of 
making insufficient appropriations for 
the prt>3ecution of these great improve- 
ments, and requested the committee to 
grant the full amount of the engineer's 
estimates, as follows: Hay lake channel. 
§1,G31.115; St. Marys river at falls, %\- 
738.8t;4. 

The indications are that the commit- 
tee will report to the house a river and 
harbor bill carrying a total appropria- 
tion of about 8".J3,000,000 to remedy in 
part any failure of the bill in the last 
congress. Such an appropriation would 
be verj' little larger than that made by 
the last act, that of 1888. 



COUNT Y VS. STATE. 

The County luMtne Myitteiu is Very Severely 
Condemned. 

Albany, N. Y., Jan. 29.— The first an- 
nual feport of the state commission in 
lunacy was made public today. A con- 
siderable amount of spac« is devoted to 
a comparison of state care and county 
care of the insane, and the report takes 
strong ground in favor of the former. 

A large number of shocking incidents 
observed in the county institutions is 
related. One aged woman, afiliutad with 
turbulent dementia, was found confined 
in a cell-like room. Her bed was inde- 
scribably filthy, and the floor was wet 
and soiled with her excrement. Her 
only attendants were two pauper 
girls who brought her food 
in a basin, which they set on her filthy 
bed. She had no companions except 
five filthy male patients in the. same 
building. The beds of the latter were 
also saturated with filtn. In «Bother 
part of the building a young woman was 
found in nothing but a blue cotton 
skirt and a man's cloak. Her room was 
cold and cheerless, and its floor was wet 
and foul. In another place the attend 
ant excused the practice of bathing 
several patients in the same water by 
saying that "the patients w ith skin dis- 
ea.ses were bathed last." In another, 
two filthy patients were put in the same 
bed. 

The commission concludes that how- 
ever feasible may be the theory of 
county care, it has fallen far 
short in practice. Its difficulties and 
defects seem to be ineradicable and it 
should be abolished by the legislature. 
As the county asylum has been a failure 
for twenty years it can hardly be ex- 
pected ever to become a success. State 
care, on the other hand, while not per- 
fect, represents all that is best in the 
present state of medical knowledge. 



FROM WEST DULUTH, 



Many New Cars; Work at the 

Blast Furnace and 

Other Shops. 



Mention of the People; A New 

Scottish Clan; Minor 

Notes. 




PIIIRIP 

I ill It i L— 



T^HAT INSURES. 



Sent to the .Senate. 
Washington, Jan. 21). — The President 
today sent to the senate the following 
nominations: Blanche K. Bri'ce of the 
District of Columbia to be recorder of 
deeds in the District of Columbia. 



OPPOSED TO H OLINESS. 

lubelieverii Make Thing^H Lively for a 
Clergyman at Wentworth. 
Concord, X. H., Jan. 29.— The Rev. A. 
S. Orne of Dover is a believer in the dcx;- 
trine of holiness. He was engaged a 
year ago as pastor of the Congregational 
church at Wentworth. The church took 
exception to his preaching holiness as a 
definite experience, with the result that 
Mr. (Jrne was called before the Concord 
Ministerial association and his license re- 
voked. He at once began an indepen- 
dent crusade, and hist week returned to 
urge his holiness doctrine upon the 
Wentworth people. 

He no sooner arrived there than most 
riotous demonstrations began about the 
buildm in which his meetings were held. 
Oaths and threats against him were 
shouted through the windows and mis 
siles were thrown against the building. 
As he left town this morning he saw 
swinging from the signboard of the 
hotel a tattered effigy of himself, on 
which was a large card inscribed, "Be- 
ware of this place. 



new 



In the House. 

Wa-shington, Jan. 29. — Mr. Payson, 
111., from the house committee on public 
lands, reported the senate bill for the 
creation of three additional land districts 
in Colorado. The bill was passed — yeas, 



182; nays. 



Mr. Dalzell, Penn., calletl 



up the electien case of Smith vs. .Jack 
son from the Fourth West Virginia dis- 
trict. Mr. Crisp, Go., raised a question 
of consideration. 

The house is in an uproar over the at- 
tempt of the speaker to count a quorum, 
an attempt A'hich was denounced by Mr. 
Breckenridge of Kentucky as revolu- 
tionarv. 



Stryker, Manley& Buck 



5 AND 6 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BUILDING. 



WANTED ! Purchase Money Mortgages up to 

$3,000 in Size. 



I I 



Sixteenth Semi-lliioual Red Figuie Sale. 



BOYS' AND CHILDREN'S CLOTHING. 




Boys require, if anything, stronger and nnore carefully-made clothing than 
their fathers, for, as the mothers well know, the little fellows give their gar- 
ments harder usuage than the men, especially these days, when the boys spend all 
their time outside of school houses coasting. Our Boys' Clothing is thoroughly 
and reliably made from wear-resisitng fabrics, and will stand lots of knocking 
about, that all youngsters give their clothes, and now that our RED FIGURE 
SALE IS IN PROGRESS our always reasonable PRICES ARE LOWER THAN 
EVER. 



Boys' and Children's Overcoats — We 



in Overcoats, as now is our clearing up time, 
will surely make them move. 



are able to offer some big bargains 
We've put prices on them that 






Kouths' and Men's Clothing at Red Figufe Prices. 





^iSDiim 



WHOLESALE. 



RETAIL. 



CAR ST OVE M UST GO. 

Att«ntii>n of Connress Attrtcted l>y the 
FatHl Monon Wret-k. 

Washington, Jan. 29. — The catas- 
trophe which occurred on Monday on 
the Monon route, near Indianapolis, has 
had the etfect of attracting renewed at- 
tention among members of congress to 
the neceesity for the passage of a national 
law prohibiting the use of coal stoves on 
any railroad in the United States. Three 
bills covering this question were par- 
tially prepared several weeks since, but 
one thing or another hiis conspired 
against their completion and introduc 
tion into the house. 

The latest railroad accident jiroves 
conclusively that not a single life would 
have been lost had the train been 
equinped with steam beating apparatus, 
and it will have the effect of ha8t<?ning 
th^demand upon congress for legisla- 
tion which will make such holocausts a 
thing of the past. 

JDamit for the Ked Ki\'er. 

Wa.shinoton, Jan. 29. — Congressman 
Comstock will send up a hill providing 
for the survey of the Red River of the 
North. It is with a view to putting in 
locks and dams to hold back the sur- 
plus water m the spring, thus prevent- 
ing disiistrous floods and making the 
river more navigable in the summer. 
The bill provides an appropriation of 
$iO,000. 

Indians Starving. 

Washington, Jan. 29. ^-In response to 
senate resolutions of the 20th inst., the 
secretarj- of the interior has sent to the 
senate a letter from the Indian commis- 
sioner in relation to the condition of In- 
dians at the La Pointe agency, in Wis- 
consin. The Indian commissioner in- 
forms the secretary that many of these 
Indians are destitute and suffering, and 
calls attention to the report of 
Indian Agent Leahy, heretofore trans- 
mitted to congress, with the recommenda- 
tion that an appropaiation of 875,000 be 
made to relieve their necessities. The 
commissioner calls attention to the fact 
that about 1,500 of the Indians have 
taken land in severalty, and suggests 
that if the money now advanced is to be 
repaid through sale of land or timber, 
congress prescribe the restrictions to be 
placed on the exjtenditures for the bene- 
tit of this class to secure to the United 
States a reimbursement. 



THIEVES ON THE RIO GRANDE. 

BunditM from the 8lHter Kepubllc Commit- 
ting Uepredation>t. "* 
Brownsville, Tex., Jan. 29.— Two 
bands of thieves from Mexico have been 
operating on this side of the river lately. 
Ljist week they captured three men near 
the Calabaso ranch, about fifty miles 
from here, and, after binding them hand 
and foot, robbed them and wounded oue 
with a sword. They aucceeded in escap- 
ing across the border with twenty-three 
head of horses, including two carriage 
horses belonging to a widow who owns 
the ferry at Arrovo. The other band 
killed a number of cattle and drove off 
twenty horses and nineteen mules be- 
longing to different people along the 
Ixjrder. They were foiled in an attempt 
to rob a store, but meeting a man named 
Santillana, they compelled him to re- 
move his clothing, which they carried 
off. Capt. Brooks of the Rangers is now 
in pursuit. 

ON E KILL ED. 

Three liadly Injured, a Fall of Ore in a 
<>ogebie Mine. 
IsHPK.Mi.No, Mich., Jan. 29^Special.|— 
At the Montreal mine on the Gogebic 
Iron range a cable broke last night let- 
ting a skip, containing a ton of ore, fall 
into the shaft. One miner was killed 
and three were badly injured. Their 
names can not be learned. 



Autlioritatively denied. 

Washington, Jan. 29.^The report 
that the Russian mission had been of- 
fered to ex-Congressman Logan H. Roots 
of Arkansas is denied upon authority. 
The president has experienced great dif- 
ficulty in finding a suitable man for this 
imix)rtant post. Col. Elliot Shepherd of 
New Vork could have had it months ago 
had he been so inclined. 



To Kegrulate the Telegraph. 
W^ASHiwGTON, Jan. 29. — The senate 
committee this morning instructed sena- 
tor Cullom to rejwrt favorably, with a 
slight amendment intended to define 
more clearly the powers of the comjui.9- 
sion, the bill introduced by Senator 
Spooner to confer upon the interstate 
commerce commission authority to regu- 
late telegraph communication between 
the states. The bill in effect applies the 
law relating to railroads to telegraph 
companies. It is substantially the bill 
passed by the senate last session. 



luveKtlfpttiuK I'nder Protection. 
Lexington, Ky., Jan. 29. -The Sharp 
rifles, of this city, have received orders 
to be ready to march to Harlan county. 
The occasion is the apprehension of 
trouble there when the circuit court 
opens. The legislature has ordered an 
investigation into the troubles in that 
county and it will probably be made 
while the troops are there. 

Blinded the Cashier. 

ViNNA, Jan. 29. — A daring robbery has 
been peri>etrated in this city. Thieves 
entered the office of the Austrian Navi- 
gation Company and, walking to the 
desk of the cashier, entered into conver- 
sation with him. Suddenly one of them 
threw a quantity of pepper into the 
cashier's eyes, temporarily blinding him. 
They then seized upon some of the 
money lying upon his desk and made 
their escape. 

THAT UNIQUE AD. 

The Duluth Train to Go Kast Friday; Its 
Koute of Travel. 

The South Shore's "Duluth Advertise- 
ment" train of fifteen iron cars, new from 
the shops of the Iron Car company, and 
filled with Imperial mill flour, several 
times mentioned in The Herald, will 
probably leave here Friday noon for 
Boston. The cars will be decorated with 
banners, flags, streamers, etc., and 
hung with statistical matter relative to 
the head of the lakes. 

The train will go via the Duluth, 
South Shore &, Atlantic to Mckinaw 
City, over the Michigan Central to Buf- 
falo, then it will take the New York 
Central for Albany, thence over the Bos- 
ton & Albany to Boston. The train will 
pass through Detroit Sunday, will reach 
Bufialo about Tuesday, Syracuse and 
Utica Wednesday, Albany Thursday and 
Boston probably Saturday, Feb. 8. 

Nativitieti of the Naturalized. 

There has been a total of 4i80 newly- 
made voters, throufjh the medium of 
first citizenship papers, since the incep- 
tion of the present campaign. Thirteen 
second papers have also been granted. 
The numl>er of each nationality is here 
given: Swe<Ien 177, Norway 79, Canada 
G2, Italy 32, Finland 28, Scotland 19, 
Russia 17, England 15, Poland 14, Ger- 
many 11, Ireland 8, Denmark 5, Iceland 
4, Nova Scotia 4, Newfoundland 3, Aus- 
tria 1, Hungary 1; total 480. 



Six bran new oars stood painted and 
lettered in the paint shop at the Car 
works yesterday ready to go out on the 
road as soon as dr>-. Seven more were 
in process of erection in the ("onstruct- 
ing shop. 

A number of men are working at the 
Steel works finishing up the iron work 
on the Incline, and building a huge wa- 
ter tank. The latter is being built of 
iron 5o feet high, resting on a stone 
foundation and will have a capacity of 
two-hundred barrels of water. 

C. W. Everitt has moved into his 
house in the Fifth division. 

Professor Stamm's social which was to 
be held next Friday evening will be 
postponed one week. 

William Jennings, who fell from a 
scaffold yesterday afternoon at the Iron 
Bay works received severer injuries than 
was at first supposed. It is found to- 
day that besides a bruised face, a dislo- 
cated finger and injured legs, he has re- 
ceived internal injuries of a serious na- 
ture. 

A. W. McRae held a singing school at 
the Congretrational church last evening. 
Ed. Melette has returned from his trip 
to Bessemer, Mich. 

John Bros., carriage manufacturers, 
have moved into one of the Duncan cot- 
tages near Second street south. 

Preliminary steps are being taken to- 
wards the organization of a chapter of 
the order of Scottish Clans here, and the 
project is meeting with encouraging suc- 
cess. It is found that about fifty 
Scotchmen or descendants of Scotchmen 
are entitled to membership and the ma- 
jority have signified their willingness to 
unite with such an organization. The 
object of the order is to unite Scotch- 
men to establish a fund for the 
relief of sick members to be- 
queath to widows and orphans a 
sum of money as its laws may prescribe, 
and attend to the burying of the dead. 
.\l8o to cultivate fond recollections of 
Scotland, its customs and amusement*. 
The administrator of the estate of O. 
C. King removed the stock of liquors 
from Phillips hotel today. 

Mrs. McGregor of Minneapolis, a 
sister-in-law of Dr. Bowman, vif-itedwith 
Cashier Smith and wife on Monday. Dr. 
Bowman and wife, Mrs. McGregor, H. P. 
Smith and wife were formerly school- 
mates at the state university, and enjoy 
ir'nn- c-o.- g<-' o-j! days together. By tue 
way, there are a number of university 
graduates in Duluth. and they should 
effect some organization to renew 
acquaintance, and keep alive memories 
of pleasant school days at old Alma 
Mater. 

The suggestion of Capt. Sharp's m re- 
gard to tapping Midway creek for water 
supply is a good one and should result 
in some definite action toward a system 
of water works. Midway creek is a good 
sized stream of pure water which bursts 
from the rocks at the top of the hills and 
empties into the bay near the car works. 
In its downward course it flows through 
a deep gulch which could be easily 
turned into a natural reservoir and the 
water conducted through pipes could be 
thrown to the height of the tallest 
buildings. 

Under circular of Jan. 23, the North- 
ern Pacific road has given notice of the 
establishment of an agency at West Du- 
luth, with Mr. Frank Dick as the agent. 
The company usee the St. Paul &. Du- 
luth freight depot and warehouse. The 
lycal rates between Duluth and West 
Duluth will be five cents per 1(X» pounds 
all classes, for small lots, and d4 for car- 
loads. Rates to all points West from 
West Duluth will be the same as from 
Duluth. 



League 



IRISH LEAGUE'S BOOKS 

A Committee of Members of the 
to Audit Itii Books. 

Detboit, Mich., Jan. 29.— President 
Fitzgerald and Secretary Sutton of the 
Irish National league of the United 
States, arrived here this morning on 
business, connected with the sijecial 
audit of the accounts of Rev. Dr. 
O'Reilly, the treasurer of the league. 
The special committee which has 
accepted this task includes 

John Hearn and Felix Car- 
bray of Quebec; Martin Bat- 
tle of Ottawa; William Gleason, 
Cleveland; Hon. 'Thomas Taite, Detroit; 
J. W. Fitzgerald, Kansas; P. H. Mc- 



TALKS ON A CANAL eW 



Cossill. St. Louis; 
Port Huron, Mich.; 
ing, Omaha; John 
mira, N. Y. 
It is the duty of 



O'Brien Aikinson, 
Mayor R. C. Cush- 
J. O'Connor of El- 

this committee to 
examine the books and records of the 
treasurer's office from the day the league 
was brought into existence to the pres- 
ent time, but the method of bookkeep- 
ing in vogue is a complicated one, and if 
the committee does its work as it should 
be done, its labors will cover at least ten 
days. 

The investigation has been called for 
in consequence of the charges which 
have been openly made that the funds 
of the league have been employed in 
the defense of the murderers of Dr. 
Cronin. Most of the members of the 
committee are in town this morning. 

TWO W EEK'S MAILS. 

Delayed Truiux Get A<-ro»H tlie (Continent 

Today; Two Week's Mail. 

San Pranciscx), Cal., Jan. 29.— It now 
seems probable that the great blockade 
on the Sirreas will sot)n be over. The 
big rotan- plow has been dug from its 
snow bed in Cascade Canon and has 
done splendid work since. The track is 
now clear as far as a plow can clear it. 
The snow it has been j)a.s8ing through 
was nearly as hard as ice and averaged 
twenty feet in depth. Railroad officials 
state that the only obstruction now is 
about a foot of hard tramped snow and 
ice which covers the rails for a consider- 
able distance. This must be removed 
by picks and shovels. 

Oflicials think the blockaded trains 
will rea(!h here today. These trains have 
two week's mail. Tne high water has 
gone down all over the state and wash- 
outs and land slides are generally re- 
paired. Great damage has been done to 
roads and bridges. 



The Engineer, Mr. Boiler, Looks 

Over the Canal Bridge 

Site. 



No Cirade Crossings in Endion 

if the Board Can 

Help It. 



See our list of bargains in another col- 
umn. Macfaklane Jk Au.STIN. 



THE FORM AL W ITHDRAWAL. 

Note of Prenident Adams Witlidrawing 
from the Intenttate Asiioclation. 

Chicago, Jan. 29.— Chairman Walker 
made public tociay the oflicial notices of 
tHe Union Pacific and Chicago & North- 
western Railway companies withdrawing 
from the Interstate Commerce Railway 
association. President Charles Francis 
Adams of the Union Pacific, in his letter 
to Chairman Walker, says: 

Referring to a decision made by you 
at the meeting of the Interstate 
Commerce liailway association held 
in New York on the 14th 
inst. to the effect that the contract re- 
cently entered into between this com- 
pany and the Chicago & Northwestern 
was a violation of the terms of the 
agreement under which this association 
was organized. I am instructed by the 
directors to inform you that in their 
opinion the decision places this company 
in a most difficult position. Your de- 
cision is that the control of traffic is a 
matter of proprietorship of lines, in 
other words, existing distribution 
of competitive traffic may be af- 
fected to any extent by the 
construction by new lines by parties to 
that association but under the articles of 
a8e<jciation, it cannot be effected or con- 
trolled by contracts between members 
of the association. I am directed to in- 
form you that if this decision is final it 
would, in the opinion of the directors, 
place this company in a position jvhich 
a proper regard for the interestsof sttxsk- 
holders would not justify. 



GAVE RO UGH O N RATS. 

A V'oung Wifeand Iter Paramour Give the 
old Uu!tl>Hnd Arwenic. 

Topeka, Kan., Jan. 29.— One of the 
most sensational cases that has been 
Ijefore the public for many years is now 
on trial in this district's court. Fannie 
Brown, a young girl, married R<3bert 
Burnside, who was old enough to be her 
grandfather. They lived together in 
Highland Park, happily it is said, until 
Charles, the old man's son by a former 
wife, was pardoned and came home from 
the i>enitentiary. He was about Fannie's 
age and an attachment followed. 

He confessed that they contrived to 
get the old man out of the waj- and gave 
him "rough on rats." The lx)dy was 
buried and several months later the 
young people quarreled. Fannie had 
Charles arrested for some trivial affair, 
and he became infuriated at her ana 
told the whole st<jry. Both were ar- 
rested. She claims to be innocent, but 
he confesses to everything. 

Gone to Mis Lord. 

NicHOLASviLLE, Ky., Jan. 29.— There 
lies dead in this place a man than whom 
there is no one better known in this 
state; Rev. Stephen Noland, who died 
suddenly yesterday evening. He was an 
evangelist and claimed that he had had 
divine visitations from .lesus Christ, who 
appeared to him in bodily form three 
times. He gave a full account over his 
signature in his paper, The Central 
Methodist, of the strange meeti_;,s, and 
described the .conversations in full. 
Many members of his church — Method- 
ist — South thought that to doubt his 
story was impiety. 



Alfied P. Boiler, a leading New York 
engineering expert, arrived in the city 
yester lay, being called here by the city 
to confer with its engineers and Maj. 
Quinn regarding a bridge over the 
canal. 

"It is impossible for me," said Mr 
Boiler to a Herald reporter, "to even ap- 
proximate the cost of abridge across 
the cinal. The scheme is perfectly 
practii sable, and it will not interfere in 
the leiist with navigation. The cost de- 
pends on many things. The structure 
will Ix a drawbridge, with piers to the 
south aide of the canal. The foundations 
for tho piers are expensive. How far 
they M ill extend below the surface is un- 
known. Soundings and borings will be 
made, and the results will l>e sent to me 
at Nevr York. 

"I am only here now to gather data 
and facta regarding the canal, but 
until I can arrive at a definite 
calcuU tion by several weeks' figuring I 
cannot give anything definite, even an 
approximation either of the character of 
the bridge or what money will be needed 
to build it." 

Mr. Poller returns to New York this 
eveninif. He will probably visit Duluth 
again ia the spring. 



WAS FO R THE LEAGUE. 
.So ^Thinks the I.ea«ue, or at L«afit so 
Says It. 

New York, Jan. 29.— Today the formal 
order of Justice O'Brien denying the in- 
junction asked for by the Metropolitan 
E.\hibition company in its suit against 
John M. Ward was filed. The Fifth 
Avenue hotel meeting called forth a big 
gathering of baseball men. Long before 
the hour of meeting, 10 o'clock, the 
hotel corridor was crowded by baseball 
men. John B. Day was kept busy 
answering questions in regard 
to the Ward decision of yester- 
day. He said the decision 
favored the League as much as it did 
the Brotberh.xKi. He hoped to see 
Ward enjoined from playing with any 
other club than the New York club. 
Walter Hewitt of Washington, consid- 
ered the opinion decidedlv la favor of 
the leajf ue. This was the op nion of all 
league people. 

The delegates present at the board of 
arbitration were Day, Rogers and Young 
of the National league, O'Neill, Von der 
Ahe and Whittaker of the American 
association. Von der Ahe acting as proxy 
for Phelps, and Wnittaker for Allen 
Thurman; .John H. Schumaker, William 
Barnieand WUliam Burnham of the 
.\tlanta association. 



NO GRADE CROSSINGS. 

The Board of Workti DIhcusr the Grade of 
Ohio Avenue. 

The nembers of the board of works 
conferied this afternoon with R. Angst, 
chief eigineer of the Duluth «fc Iron 
Range road in reference to bridging 
South street, over the railroad com- 
pany's tracks. The plan dis- 
cussed was to abandon the grading 
of Ohio avenue further down than the 
south side of Superior street, the grade 
tlien to be continued to a point between 
Indiana and Missouri avenues, opposite 
the trestle bridge over the ravine, there 
to fill i 1 so as to go across South street 
and un ier the trestle bridge. 

This matter, of course, will have to be 
decidec by the council. It is believed, 
however, that this will prove the most 
feasible plan, and would accommodate 
more ptiople than to carry out the orig- 
inal plan of continuing Ohio avenue and 
buildin i a bridge over the track. 



\«'INNIPEG TO DULUTH. 



in Running 



A. W. Wright, 
ife Winnipeg, 



Time of Skating RaceK. 

Nkwburg, N. Y., Jan. 29.— National 
Skating association races at Washing- 
ton Lake were held here this morning. 
Quarter mile; Moshier of Pishkill Land- 
ing, first; Joe Donoghuo, second; James 
Donoghue, third. Time, 37J^ seconds. 
Five mile race, Joe Donoghue, time 17 
minutes 50 seconds. 



The Portuguese UuKtling. 

Zanzibar, Jan. 29. — Advices from 
Moseambique are to the effect that the 
Portuguese are acquiring as much ter- 
ritory as possible pending a relimitation 
of boundaries of their districts on the 
Zambesi river. The British African 
Lakes company is making satisfactory 
arrangements with the Arabs and 
Karongas. 

Dr. Peters O. K. 

Zanzibar, Jan. 29. — A number of 
French parties have arrived at Malindi. 
They state that they recently met Dr. 
Peters, the (ier man explorer, concerning 
whose death many conflicting rei)orts 
have been received at Koki. He was in 
good health. 

TELEGRAPH BRIEFS. 



The Neir I.ine Expected to be 
Order This Year. 

Win? IP EG, Jan 29. — Mr. 
presideitof the Duluth 
Mr. Fisher, general manager, are in *tire 
city. 'J 'hey came here to confer witb 
Winnipeg & Southeastern people, with 
whom they have l>een carrying on nego- 
tiatione, as they expect to reach this city 
over thi» line which the latter have a 
charter for building from here to the 
boundary. 

Tliey also desired to look over Winni- 
peg anci size up its imjwrtance as a rail- 
way to\,'n, and as a result of their visit 
they arj more than ever impressed with 
the des.rability of locating this city and 
through it the great Northwest for trade 
for their new road. There is said to be 
an agriiement between the two com- 
panies that the Duluth & Winnipeg 
is to lie at the international bound- 
ary as 6oon as the Winnipeg &. South- 
eastern is there. A director of the lat- 
ter ent€ rprise said that before the pres- 
ent yea- is out they hoped to have the 
railway running from here to Duluth. 
Work o 3 the Southeastern will be re- 
sumed as soon as spring comes. 



Investigate Deathbed ChargeH. 

Minn eapolis, Jan. 29.— [Special.]— 
The grand jury commenced investiga- 
tion toe ay of sensational charges made by 
Judge Hollins on his deathbed that Dr. 
H. B. Fiy, of this city, has been guilty 
of performing many abortions. 



strikes Spreading. 
London, Jan. 29.— The strike of dock 
laboren at Liverpool and Birkenhead is 
spreading. 



"The Battles and Leaders of the Civil 
War" b< >und in appropriate finishings at 
The He 'aid bindery. 



THREAT EN TO STRIKE. 

North Wlsconiiin Woodsmen Want (Shorter 
Hours of Labor. 

Haywood, Wis., Jan. 29— [Special.]— 
A wage-war seems imminent in the lum 
ber camps of the Northwest. Ever since 
the establishment of sawmills in the 
pineries eleven hours has been con- 
sidered a day's work in the mills. But 
the agitation for shorter hours by the 
trades unions has brought the question 
directly home to *.he men employed in 
the Ashland mills. Then the advent of a 
number of Michigan mill men has a ten- 
dency to strengthen the feeling. If the 
owners or operators refuse a reduction 
of hours, a strike will be inaugurated, 
and the entire pinery district will be 
more or less affected by the labor dis- 
turbances. 

Launch at Baltimore 
Baltimore, Jan. 29.— This morning 
the vicinity of the Columbian Iron 
works, I^jcust Point, was ali\e with 
pecjple, who came to witness the launch 
of the steel steamship Maverick, built 
for the Standard Od company. The 
launch was a perfect success. The name 
of the vessel was in honor of the 
Maverick Oil company of Boston. The 
weather was so cold that scarcely 
had the bottle been emjjtied of the 
champagne than it formed a frozen wiat- 
ing around the bow. The new steamer 
is the largest steamship ever built in 
Baltimore and the second steel vessel 
ever built at this port. The first steel 
vessel built" here was the United States 
gunboat Petrel by the same company. 
The Maverick will run between Boston 
and Philadelphia. She will carry 500,000 
gallons of oil. Her hull is constructed 
of open-hearth steel. She is 240 feet 
long, 37 feet beam and 23 feet depth of 
hold. 

A I>eadlock in Columbus 

Columbus, Ohio, Jan. 29.— The senate 
IS in a deadlock today in the Marquis- 
Lampson contest for the lieutenant gov- 
ernorship, and democrate are holding 
the senate in session to await the ar- 
rival of Senator Howell, who is away on . 
indefinite leave. There are seventeen 
republicans and seventeen democrate 
present and the senate is under caU. 
Republicans insist on proceeding with 
the contest and the democrate ask a 
postponement, to which the republicans 
will not agree, hence the democrate in- 
ist on remaining under call until thev 
san bring in absentees. 



The Canvassing Board. 

Helen.\, Mont., Jan. 29.— The supreme 
court has just handed down the decision 
in the mandamus case of Thompson vs. 
Kenney. The opinion is quite lengthy, 
citing numerous authorities, and de- 
clares the certificates of the state can- 
vassing board as the legal ones, and 
orders the claim for per diem and mile- 
age to be audited. The resulte of the 
decision in the house are anxiously 
awaited. 



A Bargain. 
We have for sale a lot 90x140 feet on 
East Third street. A fine double house 
IS on the lot, which is now renting at 
$100 per month, 40 feet of the property 
is unimproved. Will sell the whole 
thing for 89.J00; 83000 cash, balance on 
terms to suit. This is a big bargain for 
the purchaser. Catch on, quick. 

211 Pastoret-Stenson building. 

400 Acres. 

All of &% and uKot nwW, sec. 2M1- 
14. E. W. Markell, 

Hotel St. Louis, ground door. 



Edison mimeograph, 
perior ftreet. 



327 West Su- 



C. H. GRAVES & CO. 



ESTABLISHED 1869. 



Horn. 
IlAiiTl-KY To Mr. and Mrs. 
Sunday, Jan. 26, a eon. 



0. G. Hartley, on 



Any kind or desoription of ledger, 
journal or record book can be made you 
at The Herald bindery and job room& 



A ^hoolmaster Arrest«d. 
BuEFALO, N. Y., Jan. 29. — School 
master Frederick Preund, who left this 
city last week to escape punishment for 
seducing a 14-year-old girl pupil, was 
arrested in Toronto. He expressed wil- 
lingness to return to Buffalo. 



.She Poisoned Eight. 

Point Plkasant, W. Va., Jan. 29. — 
News is received of the poisoning of a 
family of eight persons named Hargrave, 
by a negro woman. Four of the family 
are rejxjrted dead. 

For Sale. 
Lot 93, East Fourth street, price, 
$4,000; $2,000 down, balance on terms to 
suit the purchaser. Take advantage of 
this l>efore it is too late. It is an im- 
mense bargain. 

Eric'son Sl Stro.m, 
211 Pastoret-Stenson building. 

Commercial binding and printing re- 
ceives accurate and prompt attention at 
The Herald Job Booms. 



Lieut. Schwatka is in El Paso in 
charge of eleven cliff dwellers from the 
Sierra Madra mountains, who are mem 
bers of the Tahuarman tribe. They will 
be exhibited in this country and 
Europe. 

President Fitzgerald of the National 
Land league, and a dozen others com- 
prising the auditing committee for Dr. 
Charles O'Reilly, treasurer of the league, 
arrived in Detroit and are at work today. 

A bill is introduced in congress today 
appropriating $50,000 to survey a route 
for a ship canal connecting Lake Michi- 
gan and Lake Superior. The bill has 
been prepared by William H. Morrell, 
the chief promoter of this scheme. 

By an explosion at the Standard Oil 
works at Hunters Point last night five 
tanks of oil were burned. The loss is 
from $150,000 to $200,000. No one was 
hurt. 

The Persian Khorassan is ravaged by 
a disea.se of excessive fatality. T-ree 
tliousand deaths are reported. At Noor, 
in Meshed, there were 100 deaths daily. 
Owing to the scarcity |of doctors, the 
nature of the disease is unknown. As 
western Persia was ravaged with cholera 
through autumn, and as thousands of 
people fled to the Eastward in hope of 
escajiing from the disease, it is reported 
as possible that they carried it with 
them and that this may account for the 
trouble in Khorassan. 

Judge Kerr has granted the applica- 
tion of the judgment creditor of the Du- 
luth, Huron & Denver road, for the ap- 
pointment of a receiver for that road. 
The road has no tangible property in 
this state subject to levy and sale on 
execution, and is hopelessly insolvent. 
DBy an explosion of nitroglycerine near 
Alton, Bradford county. Pa., two men 
were blown up. 

If you want to build in Endion oon» 
suit J. M. Root & 0o.'8 ad. 



REAL 



ESTATE. 

Acres, 



Business and Dock 



We have a large list of choice Residence Lots, 
Property, of which we have exclusive control. 

-:- LOANS. -:- 

We negotiate loans in any amount on improved city property, and for par- 
ties wis -ling to build, at the lowest current rates of interest. 

INSURANCE. 

Our list of companies comprises some of the oldest and largest in exist< 
ance. We give special attention to the careful writing of policies and prompt 
and fair settlement of all losses. 



ROOMS 2, 3 AND 4, BOARD OF TRADE BLOG, DULUTH, MINN. 



REAL ESTATE. 

Special Bar gains I Snaps. 

IOC Acres in 4-50-14, 25 per cent below the 
market. 
2000 Acres in 47- 1 6 at $5 per acre. 

Lands in 28-50- 1 5 at a great bargain. 
Several pieces of acreage on the hill below 
the market. 

2 Lots on Superior Street, Endion. 

63 Lots adjoining Lonaon, cheap. 

A lew of the choicest lots in Murray & Howe's Addition for 
sale on easy terms. 

A lew desirable lots in Endion for sate without cash pay- 
ment, f improved. 

J. M. ROOT & CO., 

Room 9, Metropolitan Block. 



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PrTLTTTH a^ENiyG HEBAI.D: WEDNESDAY, JAI^UAUY 29,1890. 



E\^ENINGh HERALD. 



ELIOT LORD, PublUhar. 



PRICE. THREE CENTS— Subccrlptlon Rates: 

OMLily, by mall, per year 97.00 

Dally, by malU' per three mouths 2.00 

Daily, by mail, p«r one month 76 

IN THK CITT. 

■D*Hy. by carrier, per week '8 



Bntered at the postolBce at Duluth, Mlna.. as 
second-class mal! matter. 



"The Washintrton otfioe of The Herald Is 
at 1434 New York avenue, N. W., where the 
paper is kept on tile and where The Herald 
oorrespouJent win wek'ome visitors from the 
Northwest. 



proposes to get all its work done in a 
lumj) either at home or ver>- near here. 
If Duluth citizens in general would 
follow the custom of this purchasing 
committee, the town would be better off 
and would not be discredited by its own 
people. 

SEEN AND HEARD. 



LITTLE CHUNKS OF NEWS. 



BURY THE CLAIM. 

The Herald (.'ommends the address of 
the committee representing all classes 
of property holders in the Third division 
to the attention of all interested in put- 
ting a final extinguisher on the Prentice 
claim. It is manifestly to the interest 
of all such that this claim shall be 
buried beyond the hope of resurrection 
by a comprehensive decision to quiet 
title from the court of last appeal and in 
common fairness, all should be ready 
and willing to contribute their propor- 
tionate quota to this ead, seeing 
that all will reap the benefit 
of it in proportion to their respective 
holdings. It certainly cannot justly be 
expected of a part of the holders that 
they should bear the burden of the ex- 
pense of one suit to quiet title gratuit- 
ously for the benefit of the rest, and it is 
verj properly announced that only such 
as become parties to the action will )ie 
directly benefitted by the absolute clear- 
ance of their titles. 

The expense of such a suit will be but 
tritiing to any property holder, in pro- 
portion to the value of his unclouded in- 
terest, if the body of property holders 
unite in contribution, while if each one 
is required to defend his own title, 
or to endure the suspension 
of the claim over his head in- 
definitely, it cannot fail to 
be very costly to him. According to the 
general cont^ensus of expert legal 
opinion here,, there is no valid founda- 
tion in law for this claim, and whenever 
it has come before the courts, as it has 
repeatedly, it has been thrown out by 
adverse decisions. Still it is persistently 
held over the heads of T}«rd division 
property-holders here as a threatening 
bugbear, and though it be the barest 
shadow of a contesting title, it is suffi- 
cient as such to cloud titles held undis- 
puted for many years and give much 
annoyance to the holders. It is high 
time that it be disposed of once and for 
all, and that the claimant be no longer 
allowed to harry the property-owners of 
the Third division at will by his suits 
and menaces. * 



Said an ice dealer today : "I guess The Her- 
ald's prog-nostications a* to there probably be- 
iuK a considerable detlcit In the ice crop will 
come true. What little ice there was In the 
lake a few days o^co Is either all broken up or 
irone. At any rate Uiere is none In sight, and 
it will take considerable cold to form ice of 
sufficient thickness for storinif. There Is 
plenty of solid ii« in tlie inner bay, but we 
shan't cut it for household use, and very prop- 
erly tot). That the ice dealers are in a ({uun- 
dary is evident, and it may become necessary 
to send out of town for ne.xt sum- 
mer's supply. Obviously this will be a much 
more expensive method than by cutting: fr.m 
the lake, and llio probabilities turv that the 
poor will have to worry along' without tiie 
regular modicum of ice cream and cold drinks 
which they have been accustomed to, unless 
the ice dealers keep the price down and pocket 
tlie loss entailed by the increased expense of 
handling. A few wcHjks of the frigid weather 
that has l>eeu experienced In some parts of 
the West would be warmly welcomed In Du- 
luth by the iceven, if no one else. With the 
thermometer at the [Mjint In the shade as it 
has been for the past thirty-six hours does not 
iiold out any great amount of encouragement, 
especially as the sun gets higher in the heavens 
every day. Of the 30,000 tons requirinl for 
next year, not one-fourth has yet been saved." 
* * * 

Nearly everyone in Duluth has iieard of 
Lord Lonsdale— that wonderful Englishman 
who vanquished the Artie regions and "held 
the mirror up to" the whole of Alaska in one 
summer! when the fact is he was stuck on the 
bank of the Mackenzie river for several 
months, and the real extent of his Alaskan ex- 
plorations consisted of a few hunting trips of 
six or eight hours each. Armed with this rich 
experlenc-e, and with a copy of Lieut. Schwat- 
ka's notes of Artie and Alaskan life, together 
with an outfit of curios, he has returned to 
England, and is now writing up his travels. 
That emiiiently respectable old fogy among 
the newspapers. The Illustrated London Times, 
has been gulled Into publishing some of Lous- 
dale's romances, and has illustrated the articles 
with "views taken by his lordship while jour- 
neying in that unknown land." Lonsdale's 
trip to Alaska was planned and executed in 
1)^7 and IS88. principally in the latter year, and 
h.s return to England took place last year. 
His views must have lieen taken during that 
time, but the laughable nature of the traveler's 
pictures is that a number of them were taken 
by J. W. Johnson, the assistant signal officer 
at Duluth, who was In western Alaska for the 
Smithsonian three years before Lonsdale ever 
saw Alaska, and six or eight of them were 
publishwl In Tlie St. Paul Globe In 1888, a year 
before Lonsdale had returued to civilization: 
The Buffalo Exi)ress publishes a picture of 
Lonsdale which is remarkable, luasmueh as it 
is a perfect copy of a photograph of Johnson 
taken In isst In Alaska, a copy of which has 
been In possession of the Smithsonian Institute 
for at least four years. 



D. H. Morgan: The republicans of 
the West End are in somewhat of a fix, 
but I guess the straight ticket will be 
voted, as far as I can learn. 

P. A. Burdick: Duluth Temple Opera 
is the finest hall I ever spoke in. The 
accoustic properties are perfect. I could 
speak in that house several hours with- 
out tiring myself. It is a credit to the 
city, and the citizens. 

Rev. C. C. Salter: Yes, thanks to The 
Herald, they're cleaning the sidewalks 
at last. It has been actually dangerous 
for a man to travel along the avenues 
lately. 

TODAY LAST YEAR. 



NOTED PEOPLE. 



Masons on Wednesday a year ago 
started out with a subscription paper for 
Block to the fund of a temple and thea- 
ter at the East End. 

Workmen for the city began tearing 
down the old ojwra house walla. 

Flag River Brownstone company is 
formed to quarry stone near here. 

Directors of the Norrie mine distribute 
8150,000 in dividends. 

TWO DECADES AGO. 



The Duluth Mmnesotian of Jan. 29, 
1870, contains among other matters the 
fol'owing: 

The appointment of Richard F, Mar- 
vin to be postmaster at Duluth. 

A leading editorial on public parks for 
Duluth. 

Notes of Col. J. B. Culver's construc- 
tion of the old breakwater cribs. 

The shortest trip on record between 
St. Paul and Duluth twenty-nine hours. 

The sale of Horace Sexton's house and 
lot on Superior street to C. Markell for 
81300, and the purchase by Charles B. 
Xewcombe from Dr. Collins and Anoel 
Smith of two pieces of land, one 100x100 
feet and the other 85x100 feet, for 85500 
at First street and First avenue east.— 
[The same land today is worth at least 
100,000.— Ed.] 

The lease of forty feet frontage on Su- 
perior street, comer of Lake avenue, 
for the yearly rental of 810 
a front foot, "the highest terms any lot" 
had been leased for at that time. 

AMONG STATE EDITORS. 



SPECIFIC CHARGES WANTED. 

The election pot is hot enough as it is, 
and the men who wilfully super-heat it 
and seek to disturb the sober juilgment 
of the voters of Duluth by throwing in 
foul insinuations and fioating scandals 
expose themselves justly to very grave 
censure. The loyal friends of Mr. 
Pearson, who has borne himself in this 
time of trial, as all fair-minded men 
admit, with eminent dignity and dis- 
cretion, are not responsible for the 
throwing of these fire brands, and we are 
pleased to see that The Tribune, which 
was the declared nominator of Mr. Pear- 
son, puts itself rightly on record this 
morning as "unalterably opposed to a 
campaign of slander and abuse." 

But it does speak explicitly further in 
the same editorial of "the contemptible 
work ai the republican primaries^ by 
which the party unquestionably was 
swindled out of its rightful candidate." 
In the interest of fairness and of all the 
voters in this city, The Herald calls 
upon it and upon all persons poseeseing 
any personal and positive knowledge of 
such alleged swindling or of dirty work 
of any kind connected with the present 
election to state specifically what they 
know and back it up with any corrobor- 
ative evidence attainable. Public office 
should never be a private snap, and the 
honest voters of Duluth will never wil- 
fully be parties to fraud or prostitution 
of suffrage by caucus manipulators, 
voters, or delegates, nor will they know- 
ingly be instrumental in the reaping of 
the fruits of such fraud or prostitution. 
In justice to all The Herald calls for the 
truth and let the city see to it that no 
guilty man escapes, if his guilt is shown. 
We shall print no scandals v iH-suj)- 
ported charges, but we shall hold the 
names of all informants on this subject 
in strict confidence and investigate their 
statements to the best of our ability. 
Whether we print a line on the subject 
depends upon the evidence, and we shall 
publish no evidence without the written 
authorization of the giver. If there is a 
basis of truth m any charges of this 
kind, it is too grave a matter for a news- 
paper that values the truth and 
tries to tell it to pass over. 
If there is no basis of truth, it 
ia common justice to any implicated, 
directly or indirectly in scandalous re- 
ports to BO declare, after they are sifted 
to the bottom. The Herald does not 
profess to be a judge for others in this 
matter, but it will assuredly state its 
own honest conclusion, after investigat- 
ing such evidence as may be submitted, 
soberly, carefully, but without fear or 
favor. 



The Weather Bulletin. 

Meteorological report received at 
Miim.. 8 a. m. Jan at, 1S80. 



Duluth 



PL.ACES. Bar Ther. 



Duluth :JO.O:,' 32 

Pt. Arthur.. :W.(iO: SJ 
Winnipeg.. :{ii.2»i|— 12 
St. V^iuoent .'Ju.i.' — 10 
Q'Appelle. im (« 



Aseinib'ne .ia•.^4 

Helena j-'^.S-) 

Huron,Dak W.at 
St. Paul .... .ki. 04 
La Crosse., :^l>.o^ 
Bismarck... I ».l^ 
Moorhead . . |:lo. 16 



% 
40 
13 

34 



Wind Kain. 



SW 
NW 
N 
N 

SB 

SW 

SW 

NW 

W 

SW 

NW 

N 



Weather 



Cloudy 

Cloudy 

P't i;ioudy 

Cloudless 

P't Cloudy 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 

Cloudy 

Cloudless 

Cloudy 



T In rain ct>lumn indicates trace One (1) 
inch of rain or melted snow equals ten (10> In- 
ches of snowfall. .Minus (—) in temperature 
column indicates IhjIow zero. 

w. H. Fallon, 

Sergeant Signal Corps 

DcLCTH, Jan. 29.~Z,oca/ forecast for 
twenty-four hourn, ending 10 a. m. Jan. 
■iO: Colder, fair tceuther. 

Washington, Jan. 'Jd.— Forecast for 
twenty-four hours, ending S a. in. to- 
niorrow: For Minnesota: Fair, colder 
in southeast, tcarm in northicest por- 
tion, northerly winds, becoming vari- 
able. For North Dakota : Warmer, fair, 
wiwls shifting to southeasterly. For 
South Dakota: Fair, slightly colder in 
western, stationary temperature in east- 
ern portion, variable winds. 



Exchange: The Farmers alliance will 
and should be an important factor in 
the next election in Minnesota. Not 
many farmers are politicians, and occa- 
sionally some indiscrete and ambitious 
member makes a bad break, but the 
general purpose of the alliance is good, 
and if the political schemers and office- 
seekers don't get too strongly fastened 
upon it, the alliance will hold the bal- 
ance of power, and it will be in safe 
hands. 

Mankato Free Press: The object of 
the Bly-B island race around the world 
was to determine in how short a time 
the trip could be made by an ordinary 
passenger usingordinarj- modes of travel- 
ing. That being the ca'se, Nellie Bly's 
trip has no importance whatever. Char- 
tered steamships and special trains are 
not "ordinary," nor are they indulged in 
by the casual traveler. On the other 
hand Miss Bisland has used only the 
regular accommodations open to any 
tourist, and when she reaches New York 
the solution of the question will be 
made. 

Mankato Review: If Senator Davis 
cannot control the federal patronage of 
Minnesota, there is one thing he can do, 
and that is turn out the democratic 
postmaster at St. Paul. 



Charles Villiers is now tlie oldest 
member of the English house of com- 
mons. He is 87 years old and has sat 
•jontinually for Wolverhampton since 
1835. 

At a recent London sale Voltaire's sig- 
nature brought only two guineas. Sir 
Isaac Newton's three, a letter by Boe- 
well £10 and one by Johnson only £9. 

A reception is to be tendered Mme 
Modjeska by the New England Womens 
Press awociation at the Parker house 
Wednesday afternoon. 

Andrew Twaddle, who died recently at 
Morristown, Ohio, aged 74, was the last 
of a famous family of nine children, all 
born without optic nerve, therefore stone 
blind. The state deeded them a section 
of land for a farm, and they became 
wealthy and useful citizens. 

There are four members of the United 
States senate who can never be candi- 
dates for the presidency of this republic, 
under the constitution, because of alien 
birth. Senator .Tones was born in Eng- 
land; Gen. McMillan, Ontario; Senator 
Beck, Scotland, and Senator Pasco, Eng- 
land. Of the No.^thern senators only 
two were born in th^ South, and not one 
Southern senator is of Northern origin. 

The oldest living Uerman is believed 
to be Markus Jo -dan of Bielfeld, in 
Westphalia, who completed his 110th 
year in comparatively robust health the 
6th of October. 

Maj.-Gen. Crook is one of the plainest 
men in the United States army. His 
modesty is unusual in a soldier, and he 
looks more like a farmer than a general 
with a fine war record. He is a short, 
heavy-set man, with a thick beard. 

The Czar has been seized with a freak 
for economy, and has so reduced the ex- 
penses of the royal household as to 
create doubts of his sanity. 



STATE AND NORTHWEST. 



The committee appointed by the grain 
men of the chamber of commerce of St. 
Paul discussed the destitute counties of 
South Dakota. The counties of Spink 
and Faulk are said to be especially des- 
titute. The plan which was thought 
most advisable was the issuance of 7 per 
cent bonds by the state, and thus 
people needing help could obtain aid at 
once. 

Northern Iowa is being Hooded with 
bogus silver dollars. 

The retail lumbermen's ^invention, 
which meets at Minneapolis today, will 
be an affair of no little importance to 
the trade in the Northwest. Between 
200 and ,300 representatives are expected 
and a permanent organization will be 
etfected. 

As the St. Paul & Duluth north-bound 
limited was pulling out of Hinckley 
etation last evening 13-year-old Robert 
Collms jumped on the train to take a 
nde, and, while jumping off, slipped and 
fell under the train, which passed over 
both of his legs. He died soon. 

The woman suffrage bill failed to pass 
the North Dakota senate. 

Minnesota stamls first in the country 
as a wheat state, having protluced the 
past year 1.3,0aJ.000. California comes 
next with 13,000,000. The Dakotas pro- 
duced 42,000,000. Minnesota had .3,100,- 
000 acres in wheat. Minnesota is third 
in oats with 53,000,000. 

TEMPLE OPERA NOTES. 



*Kickine at Kali Rat«s, 
Grand Forks Plaindealer: It is of the 
utmost importance that all interested in 
Grand Forks attend the meeting of the 
railroad commissioners. When coal can 
be transported from the mines in 
Pennsylvania to Duluth for twenty-five 
cents per ton [this statement is not cor- 
rect—Ed. Herald] it would seem that the 
railroads could transport Dakota coal 
half that distance for lees than ten times 
the charge. Another point that should 
be looked after is local rates. The charge 
for transportation from Grand Forks to 
Grafton, forty miles, is one-third the 
tariff from St. Paul to Grand Forks. 
Local rates as compared with the rates 
from St. Paul are in favor of the big citv 
that Grand Forks' wholesale houses are 
shut out. If the present legislature does 
not do their duty by the people— there 
may be another legislature some time. 

What Kind of a Club is This?. 
.\s an instance of amateur Dakota leg- 
islation, the Bismarck Tribune calls at- 
tention to a bill which provides that cer- 
tain papers shall be filed with 
county clerk in which a railroad or 
part thereof, is situated." 

A Future Supply. 

Fargo Republican: "The coal fields in 
the Dakotas and Montana are inexhaus- 
tible and will supply a nation," said Maj. 
Powell of the geographical survey, be- 
fore the senate committee on irrigation. 

MY LITTLE WIFE. 



Attention, Property Holders! 
The undersigned are a committee ap- 
pointed by a meeting representing all 
classes of property holders in the Third 
division of Duluth. 

They were appointed to secure the co- 
operation of all property holders in the 
division who desired to join in a suit t«} 
quiet the adverse claim of Frederick 
Prentice to an undivided one half inter- 
est in the division. 

The Prentice claim has been twice ad- 
versely adjudicated by the courts, and 
is generally and justly regarded as with- 
out any foundation whatever. Never- 
theless, he persists in .isserting it, and 
can make it a source of annoyance and 
embarrassment to property holders for 
many years to come, unless aggressive 
measures are taken by property holders 
to dispose of it. In the absence of ag- 
gressive measures, there is also danger 
that valuable testimony in support of 
the regular title may be lose by the 
death of witnesses. 

It is proposesd that all property hold- 
ers in the division who desire to take the 
necessary steps to quiet their title, shall 
join in one suit against Prentice for that 
purpose; and in order that every prop- 
erty holder in the division may have the 
benefit of such an action at a compara- 
tively trifling expense, public notice of 
this proposed suit is hereby given. 

All those who, in order t« participate 
in the benefits of the action, are willing 
to contribute to its expense in propor- 
tion to the value of their several prop- 
erties, should call immediately at the 
office of Snively, Craig «t Green, in the 
First National bank building (they hav- 
ing been employed to assist in the pre- 
liminary work of organization), and leave 
their names and a de.scription of their 
Third division properties. 

Property holders are p&rticularly cau- 
tioned that the action will benefit only 
those who become parties to it. 
Dated Jan. 23, 1889. 

M. R Baldwin, 
G. G. Hartley, 

L. M. WiLCUTS, 

Committee. 



POLLING PLACES. 

Boundaries of Wards and I'reciactii and 

Where to Register. 

Below are given the places of voting 
for the municipal election that is to 
take place on Feb. 4 next. 

First ward— Afla Dailey's lumber office. 

Second ward— McBeth's grocery store. Bast 
Superior street. 

Third ward, first precinct— All territory east of 
lia.>e avenue to Third avenue east. Poll- 
ing place. No. 136 East First street. 
Second precinct— All territory between Third 
avenue ea«t and SLxth avenue east. Poll- 
ing place, SJT) East Superiorstreet. 
Thlni preclnct-All territory between Sixth 
avenue east and Tenth avi>nuo east. Poll- 
ing place, corner of Superior street 
and Washington avenue. 

Fourth ward, first precinct— All territory be 
tween Lake avenue and Tlilrd avenue west 
north of the First ward limits. Polling 
place, Howard building, 113 West First 
street. 
Second precinct— All territory between 
Third avenue west and Sixth avenue west. 
Polling plaoe,41» West Superiorstreet. 
Third precinct— All territorv between Sixth 
avenue west and Twelftli avenue west 
I'olling place, 101 West Superior street. 

Fifth ward, first precinct— All that part of 
Fifth ward north of Northern Pacific rail- 
road yards and east of Garfield avenue. 
Polling place, 1605 West Superior street. 
Second prec-inct- All that uart of Kices 
Point south of Northern Pacific railroad 
yards. Polling place, 836 Garfield avenue. 
Third precinct— All that part of the ward 
west of Garfield and Piedmont avenues 
and north of the Northern Piicitic railroad 
yards. Polling place, li«aa West Michigan 
BtJeet. 
Sixth ward— Polling place. No. 2231 West 
Michigan street. 



RHYME OF THE GOOSE. 



An Old Lady, a Stranger and a 

Goose Constitute the 

Subject ot a 



Little Story, Which, if you Have 

the Leisure, You Might 

Read. 



Whether True or False We Cannot Say; At any 

Rate, Some Useful Lessons May be 

Gathered Therefrom. 




The Importance of purif jing the blood can- 
not be overestimated, for without pure 
blood you cannot enjoy good health. 

At this season nearlj every one needs a 
food medicine to purifj', vitalize, and enrich 
the blood, and Hood's Sarsaparilla is worthy 
yotir confidence. It in peculiar in that it 
strengthens and builds up the system, creates 
an appetite, and tones the digestion, while 
it eradicates disease. Give It a triaL 

Hood's Sarsaparilla is sold by all druggists. 
Prepared by C. I. Hood & Co., Lowell, Mass. 

lOO Doses One Dollar 



SPECIAL 



BARGAINS 



For Sale 



160 Acres in 9-49.15. 



FORiy ACRES 



80 

40 

320 

80 
48-15. 



9-49- 

1-49- 

35-48- 



15. 
15. 
15. 



Water Front, 



any 
any 



-IN THE- 



The outlook for Chicago-St. Paul rail- 
ways for next summer's freight traffic is 
predicted in another column and the 
action of the Duluth roads outlined. 
While this is the prospect for the sum- 
mer, the Soo road and the Duluth, 
South Shore & Atlantic are cutting oif 
the heretofore acknowledged territory of 
Chicago roads in the West and South- 
west in winter. 



"right,- 
The jijvlal manufacturer. 



account 



Taxpayers can not but be pleased at 
the manner in which the county is pro- 
oeeding to get ita supplies for next year. I 
The purchasing committee, of which K ^^M^fke •^ul^'^c-u;r-f^Cfl'"s"gVumlcl* '^^- 



The "Zig-2^" entertainment last 
ni>,'ht was an insult to the good nature 
of an audience which charitably sat over 
two hours. The piece was cut down 
nearly an hour, and instead of using the 
regular lines the actors spent the even- 
ing in -guying" each other and the peo- 
ple who paid money to hear them. 

"The Dark Secret" opens a four 
nights' engagement at Temple Opera 
next Monday evening. Ned Hanlon, 
the oarsman, is with the company 
Among the others are Capt. William A 
Andrews, with a record of 1,055 miles in 
sixty-two days in a doery upon the 
Atlaiitie; the famous Herbert Brothers 
acrobats, and the noted Arlington quar- 
tet, which will appear in songs on the 

^i^^S' ^^^ P'"^ '^^®''® •*• » rescue of 

the heroine by the hero from a grave in 
real, genuine water. The piece is very 
exciting and contains much genuine 
merit, while it is interjjreted by a tirst- 
class company. 

PESSIMISTIC BENNER. 

•Tls pleasant to see him now at bis desk. 

The hearty manufacturer; 
His busine s is "good," his bank 



IM. S. Bridges in Judge.] 
I love her for her willful ways, 
Hriglit tears, impetuous words of praise: 
for fiasbing anger's iiglitnirig fleet, 
tor questioning l(x)k», for kisses swoet; 
1 loTe her when she lauglis. and when 
she frowns— oh, how I love her tlien ! 

She is not prudent, meek or wise; 
Ijot such a jewel as they pruo 
Who seek perfection in the form 
Of lovely woman. Sun and storm 
And fire and frost in lier combine; 
llut, oh, I'm very glad she's mine. 

Her changing moods are hard to gauge- 
Now wildly gay, now mildly sago. 
Now brisk and busy all at)out. 
Now faat asleep, now going out. 
Now wiping tears away, perplext. 
Next making tea, and singing next. 

Biit she Is at her loveliest best. 
W hen day is done and time for rest 
Draws near, and sleep hangs in her eyes 
Like waiting snow In wintry skies; 
And when she kneels to say her prayer 
Mr worldl y heart kneels with her there. 

In Maine. 

Boston Courier: Mechanic: "I want 
a gallon of rum for mechanical pur- 
poses" Druggist: "What is your busi- 
ness? ' M.: "I'm a painter." D.: "Oh 
yes; I've heard of alcohol being used in 
your business. All right, sir." M.: 
Ihankyou. How much?" D- "Well 
say ^150." M.: "All right (pays). D.' 
(as M, IS leaving): "By the way, how do 
you use the spirit?" M.: "Mix it with 



EAST END 



-AT A- 



Bargain. 



2 Grand Avenue lots. 

2 Lots on Central Avenue. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $ I 750. 

I Cottage House, with 
well, West Duluth, $1 180. 

I Cottage House, with 
well. West Duluth, S2000. 



Downing a Lie. 

..T>^®.T ^°^^ Weekly: Editor's wife: 
1 retty condition for you to crjme home 
m— staggering through the streets in 
broad daylight." Dilapidated spouse: 
"Couldn't help ,t, m'dear; been accused 
of (hic) bribery." "Bribery?" "Vee" 
m dear; people said I was (hic) bribed to 
oppose pro'bition. Had to show folks I 
posed pro'bition m'own accord." 



Terms - Veri - Hdvaotageous 



Terms on Houses, 1-4 Cash, Balance 
U and 3 years at B Percent. 



R. Jetferson is chairman, has done in 
county business just what any large in- 
dividual buyer, had he the true interests 
of himself and his city at heart, would 
da The board recognizes the fact that 
Duluth can do any class of work as well 
and at as low figures as oukiiders, and it 



I.V . »r .hV- 'T profits glguntlc- 

ut ,'^T." *"* ^^ "1° '" »'"' '"'^' >'^''*«- t<> come, 
W hen Den ner is hei-e wit h his panic. 

Danciug and Deportment. 
Prof. James S. Moon will enroll new 
names for his second term at No 113 
West First street. Ladies' class, Mon- 
days; gents', Tuesdays; ladies' and gents'. 
vV ednesdaya, at 8 p. m. 



Her Hands Fall. 

Texas Siftings: Excited boy: "Come 
on quick! Tneouldmanis batin' the 

Why don t she come herself if she 
wants to make a complaint, or have 
him arrested?" Excited boy: "She's 
too busy She's got him down and is 
bumpin his head on the tlure." 



love's 8iicrlHc«. 

■Terre Haute Express: Wickshire: 
What have you got your coat all but- 
toned up for Yabeley ! You surely are 
not suffering from the cold this warm 
evening? 

Vabsley: I'm going to wee my best 
girl, and I ve got on a necktie she bought 
for me the other day. 



. IW*Acreage near the city 
limits at below market prices. 



H. P, MILLS 



I 



ADDRESS 



410 Alio 411 FIRST IJillONIiL BAIIK eillLOIIIG. 



COFFIN & WARNER, 



80 FABOnSSON BLiXIK. 



S 



.9 



Care of Herald, Duluth. 



40 Acres, section 30-48- 1 4. 
I 20 Acres, section 34-48-14. 

60 Acres, section 32-48-13. 

40 Acres, section 18-60-14. 
I 20 Acres, section 6-49- 1 6. 

40 Acres, section 2-60- 1 6. 

40 Acres, section 32-48- 1 4. 

40 Acres, section 26-48-16. 

20 Acres, section 28-48-13. 

40 Acre>, section 24-50-16. 
1 20 Acrei, section 30-60. 1 6. 



I knew an old wife, lean and poor. 
Her rags scarce held together; 

There strode a stranger to the door. 
And It was windy weather. 

He hold a goose upon his arm. 
He utter d rhyme and reason: 

'Here, take the goose and keep you warm; 
It is a stormy season.' 

She caught the white groose by the leg: 
A goose— 'twas no great matter; 

The goose let fall a golden egg 
With cackle and with clatter. 

She dropt the goose and caught the pelf. 
And ran to tell lier neighbors; 

And bless'd herself, and cursed herself. 
And rested from her labors." 

—Tennyson. 

Our readers may possibly 
think that the foregoing poem 
is rather far-fetched. But after 
all, -when rightly considered, it 
contains some food for reflec- 
tion. There are a great many 
people who have a hard strug- 
gle in lite, and often when 
everything seems darkest and 
the surroundings are the most 
discouraging, they are nearest 
port. It is an old sa3'ing that 
"The darkest hour is just be- 
fore day." This old lady in 
the rhyme saw an opportunity 
and she didn't wait to ask how 
old the goose was; whether it 
was fat or lean; or whether, on 
the whole, she had belter ac- 
cent or decline. She took it 
"too quick," and in seizing the 
first good piece of fortune in- 
stanter, another and a greater 
one immediately followed. In 
acquiring a competence, the 
first thousand dollars is gener- 
ally the most difficult to ac- 
quire. Many times people 
work long and hard and have 
to practice rigid economy to 
get a ijtart, and then get into 
the right current and drift on 
to fortune with apparent ease. 
But such people never refuse 
splendid opportunities, or turn 
their backs on small things. It 
is the easiest thing in the world 
to make money if you only get 
into the right drift. The old 
lady had laith that the goose 
was a good one, and she "caught 
on" so quick that the goose 
yielded up a golden egg and the 
poor woman's fortune was made. 
Now, you may smile when we 
apply the moral to something 
practical. It would have been 
no more unwise for the dear old 
lad}' to have refused to accept 
the go(3se till she had lirst been 
introduced to the stranger and 
ascertained that he was of a re- 
spectable famil}', than it is for 
you to stand hesitating as to 
whether 3 ou should buy lots in 
Crosley Park at the give away 
prices we are offering. In 
a year from now we will all 
see how ridiculous it was for 
Mr. Crosley to sell such tine 
property at such prices (to say 
nothing of the terms) and for 
you to stand by looking on \<^hen 
you should have known that val- 
ues must inevitably make such 
large advances in so shoit a 
time. When spring opens up 
(and there is but one more 
month of winter) there will be 
from tifty to one hundred new 
houses built in Crosley Park 
and Lester Park adjoining. 
Within six months suburban 
trains will run each way$l^very 
half hour from 6 a. m. till mid- 
night, and the fare will proba- 
bly be the same as stieet car 
fare. Then, too, within a 3'ear 
you can build a $50,000 resi 
dence down there if you wish, 
and you can have water, sewers 
and electric lights the same as 
you have in Duluth, All these 
things are now assured, and 
those who buy Crosley Park 
lots by the quantity at present 
prices will make big money. 
We propose to advance prices 
soon and we suggest that it 
would be a good idea to buy 
before that time; i e, if you 
care to niake money. There is 
always a time to buy and a time 
to sell, and now is the time to 
buy lots at Crosley Park, and 
any time during the next five 
3ears you will have opportuni- 
ties of selling so as to make 
large profits. Call at the office 
and get further information. 



AMUSEMENTS. 



TEMPLE OPERA. 

DR. GK O. B. HATCOCK. 



M-tiungeT 



imEHISAIlOT J r I I 



NIGHIS AND 

MATIIEE 

CGMMIXCme 

Grai d Matinee Wednesday, 2 p.tn. 
JetT) rson Taylor's Aquatic Spectacle 

A DARK SECRET 

Real Ito V Boats, Canoes, Kacing Shells and 
bteam Lf.unches, laden with pleasure-st ekers 
on a KI^ ER OF REAL WATER. '"'^''^'^ 

Incor wrated In the story of this Drama 
THE (JREAT HENl EY REGATTA, 

For whl;h law sq. ft. of the stage will be 
tlfxjded inth 5(KXI cubic feet of water, from 
two to t ight feet deep. 

EDWARD HANLANI 

The champion oarsman of the world will ap- 
IHjar in h s own racing shell 

America's Noted Acrobats, 

THE HERBERT BROTHERS, 

1 1 their unsurpassed gyrations. 

THE ARLINGTON QUARTET, 

In bea itlful vocal selections on the Kiver. 
The Reaistic Drawing Scene! The Terrific 
Kain btoi m ! The Race for the Diamond Sculls ! 

Sale of H'ats opens Thursday, Jan. 31. Prices 
as usual. ' 



MONEY TO LOAN 

ON IMPROVED PROPERTY. 

F. H. BARNARD, 

ROOM 16 FARGUSSON BLOCK. 



PEOi'LES THEATER. 



DULUTH. 



JOHN 8. BARNES, Mgr. 



The Best Vaiieti Show in the Horthwest 

This week, commencing JAN. 27, 

Open e\ ery night. You should see our 

list of Stars this week. 



OSTRICH FEATHERS Cleaned. 
Curled and Dyed. 

Kid Gloves Cleaned. 

MRS. HUNTER.Hoe Second St. East. 



WANTS, FOB SALE, ETC 



ONE CENT A aORD IN ADVANCE. 



Advertisements under this head received at 
the lollo^viug iiiaces, besides the business of- 
flct! ot 1 he lleraid : 

Eudion Phariuacy, 127 Tenth arenue east. 
i»oyce & Toiiuau, corner Fourth avenue 

and Superior street west. 

J. W. Nelson, No. isul, comer Eighteenth 
avenue west ana Superior street. 

U "luib *"'*"°' ^^"^ '^'®'"'' i*hilUps hotel, Wert 



Help Waut^l. 



/-CANVASSERS Wanted to sell best Ameri- 
\^ can watches; big commifttion to reliable 
mcu. Apply t«C. W. \\au/A.r, agent Mluu^ 
sola W aKd company, -JM tourtn avenue west. 



W'' ANTJiD— A cook tor a small tamlly in 
quire, itU) Ka»l Second olroet. 

■yi,'' ANTKD— A boy at St. Lukes hospital. 

1W1SH to employ a few ladles on salary to 
take charge ol uij business at their homes, 
l^ighi, very tiUjciuallug and hualthlul. Wages 
»lu per weeK. RcKitjuce given. Good pay lor 
liari time. Address with ttamp, Mrs. Marion 
>>alkcr, touisviUe, Ky. 



Admission: Gallery, IQc; Parquet, 25c; 

Orihestra Chairs, 35c; Box 

Stats, 50c. 



WANTED— A girl tor general bouse work; 
lamily ol ihree. Call In forenoon, 411 
Ninth avenue east. 

S#-i( \ SALAKV, MO exiienses In advance. 
wVFV-f alioweU each mouth. Steady em- 
iioj mci.1 at home or traveling. No soUciuug. 
Dunes ueln enng and making colleclious. No 
postal cards. Adoresti with stamp. Hater ii. 
vo., i'iqua, Ohio. 

WANl-KD-P^^tr^^ 
Inquire I'hiUlp: 



cook, 
hiUlps uolel. 



also other help. 



P99S^ ° '®° ** '^=30; performance commences 
at b:M. 



REAL ESTATE. 



SPECIAL LIST 



BARGAINS 



0. E. 



OFFEItED By 

RICHARDSON. 



Acreage tn the hill, just back of 
Ninth Street, on which will be lo- 
cated three lines of street railway. 
Undividi d half interest in this forty 
acres can be had for $52,000 

80 Acres ,it West End, near Brook- 
dale DMslon 100,000 

640 Acres near Old Superior 150 

I Acres i i the heart ot the East End, 
on both ! iidas of Fourth sti eet 30,000 



The best b?r}?aln offered now Is stock In the 
Lakewood Land Company, which Is safe and 
sure. An nvestment of a small sum will carry 
as large .t rate of profit as a large capital 
could secure. Nothing in the history of Duluth 
has prom sed so large returns. A limited 
amount st II for sale. 



VirANltD— At the Womans Employment 
TT bureau, :J11 superior street east, two 
second girls aiiu a dozen girls tor general 
house work, limploymeiit obtained tree of 
cost. Mrs. A. D. Ayci-s. 



for iMile. 



IT^OH SALE— A heavy working teaia cheap 
JJ at A. \\ . hilers aw Lake avenue south. 

Ij^OK SALE— My residence with 60 or luu teei 
JL at aiij fcaot oecoud Bireel. Terms to suit 
purchaser. H. A. iiUlMiri Kl Board of Trade 



Hl!.A% i HOKSES t\)R SALE— 15 head ol 
heavy hoi ses, raised at Lake Parii, on 
Uic Northern l^aciUc road, lor sale Ijy C. W. 
tiarvey. Can Oe seen at Uowara barn, on the 
lake shore, Minnesota point. Kcsidence. SS 
« est iourth street. 



Lost. 

L'JST— Part of a gold-link cuff button in 
shape ot three rings. Lost in Superior 
01 Duluth, Finder will receive reward by 
lca\ iug lUe same at my otfioe. Kobert (i. Mc- 
Dowell, J:r, Wect Suptrioi street. 



l''or K«ut. 

OU ilENT— Desirable room: 
steam, etc.; urivate family. 



F 

lleraid othce. 



bath, gas. 
Address S., 



>\autea— Tu UeiiU 



WANTED-A furnished house for the win- 
ter. L. J. Taussig, No. 9 Phoenix block. 



C. E[. RICHARDSON, 

325 West Superior Street. 



WANTED AT ONCE! 



$2,50Ci Mortgage. 
SI.OOC' Mortgage. 
$800 Mortgage. 
S600 Mortgage. 
S200 Mortgage. 

Loans of other sizes negotiated on 
twenty-four hours' notice. 

N. J. UPHAM, 

Under First Nat. Bank. 

FIRJ3 ixsura:nce. 



J'^iiuuicial. 

DULUTH MOUTUAGK LOAN COMPANY 
loans money in any amount on lurnl- 
luio, pianos, horses and wagxjns without re- 
moval Irou) owner's possession ; also ou ware- 
iiouse leccipts. bank .stocks, and any i>roperty 
ot value; uot*;s disc<junte.i; partial payments 
received and your own time granted lor pay- 
irieui ; uo delaj- ; money ou baud auu lurnUbed 
immediately alter security is appiuveu. Wm. 
tlorkun. Manager, Uoum 1;:, Fargusson block, 
Duluth, Mluu. 



JF YOU WISH TO SELL OK BUV DULUTH 
or SujKjrlor bauk stock, corporatiou or In- 
\cstment securities, call on or address B. Mur- 
phiu, broker, y liauuiug block, Duluth. Minn. 



MISCELLANEOUS. 



"Vr H. WILSON, ATTORNEY AND COUN- 
J3I • sellor at Law. Will practice In State 
ami Lui ted States Courts. All business given 
prompt attention, « Fargusson Block, Duluth. 
Mluu. 





LU 

< 

(0 
LU 

-J 

< 
LU 



a 

UJ 

h 
o 

-I 

o 

(0 

Ui 
U 

z 
u 
a 

z 
o 

0. 

00 

111 
oc 
a: 
O 
o 



pLASTEKlNG. 

H, T. DINHAM. 

All kinds of plastering done. Jobbing 
promptly attended to. Otiice, room D, Hun- 
ter block. 



M 



RS. J. 8. DINWOODIK, 



Teacher of Piano Forte, Voice and Sight Sing- 
ing. Chorus and Choir Couductiir. 

Music rooms at J. J. Wigglns's, 16 Bast Su 
perior street, and at residence, m Tenth ave. B 



"VTB. H. PARKEK ROBINSON. 
VOCAL INSTRUCTION, 
8 MILES BLOCK. 



McMILLEN & STEBBINS, ARCrilTBCTS 
and superintendents. Office, room No. 
— , Exchange building. 



ARCiilTKCTS AND 
IT Superintendents.room 4«>, Exchange bulld- 
~ B. S. Palmer. L. P. HalL 



PALMER & HALL, 
Superlntendenr 
Ing, Duluth. Minn. 



w.c. 




HO., 



RIGH'D F. MARVIN, 
REAL ESTATE, LOANS 



I N «i 



—AND— 

c. U R A N C E . 

Rooi US 1,2, Exchange BIdg. ~ 
DULUTH. - - MINN. 



REAL ESTATE, 
LOANS AND INSURANCE, 

HAVE OBNTTINE BAHQAIMS IS 

LOTS AND BLOCKS, 

In dlffei parts of the cltj and 
ACRE PROPERTY ADJOINING. 

All we ask Is for pt rties to examine our list and 

compare them rlth other prices before 

buying. Call or write. 

W. C. Sherwood & Co., 



HUMPHREYS 



Db. Hl'mphrj ;y8' Specifk-s are scientifically and 

nany 
over 

clflcjs'a speola I ciire for the disease nMiecl^ ***^ 

These Specllics cure wltliout drugKlnK 'dxitb- 

tagorreduclnj tAe system, and areln flcf a^ 

deed t heaovei elgn remedl ea of the World. 

liST OF PMNCIP O, N08. CCKBS. PRICES 

1 Fevers, 1 'ongestlon. Inflammation 
9 Worms, Worm Fever, Wonn Colic 

3 Crjlni t olIcorTeethlng Of Infants 

4 Diarrhe i, of Children or Adults 
" DrseDtei-y, Griping, Bllloiis Colic...'. 

kolera In orbns. Vomiting . 



THE SPALDING. 



E. P. EMERSON, Proprietor. 



Strictl) First-Class in all Ippointments. 



ConghB, 2oldL Bronchitis." 



, 2oldL 

Nenralgla, Toothache, Faceaciie 
. X Heaoac* em. Sick Headache, Vert 
10 UyspepBla, BUlous Stomach 



DULUTH, 



MINN. 



All below the market. 
COFFIN & WARNER. 



C. L LOe 4 CO., 

32 Fargusson BIdg. 



H ?JJ?R'«'"««'dS'?*lnfi«I Period*. 

yJt Whitea, 00 Profuse Periods 

J? Cronp, Cugh, DUBcolt Breathing .. 
Is vA'* Kheum, Eryslnelas, Eruption*. 
13 Rhenmii inin, RheamatlePjin».... 
i g £p,v«r am I A gne. Chills, Malaria. . . . 

ir Piles, PU? dor Bleeding 

As <!?.'■"''•• Influenza, Cold In the Head 
SV.VVBOopIni CoDgli, "7<oIent Coughs. 
SS li*". V»' " eblllly, Thyslcal Weakness 

sZ {'^•"•neyriseBBe .aw 

*S Kervous ] >ebllity 1 .55 

2.Q Iir'""''y irVeakne«», Wetting Bed. .SO 
StC^Olseases aftheHeart, Palpitation 1.00 

Sold by Drugilsts, or sent postpaid on receipt 
M price. Db. ItCMrBBSys' MAKrit., (IM pages) 
richly bound U .cloth and gold, mailed free. 
Hamphrey' MeJictneCo.lOS Fulton St. N Y. 

Specific^. 



A. FITGER &. GO'S 

Lake Saperior Brewery 

Is the Urjrest In the State tt Min teaota ou vide 



Gkkat French remeay. Dr. LkDuc'8 pkr- 

-iCAL Hti^Ls. from Paris. Prani?. acionly o^ 

Rcneratlve organs in female^ and 6o8i° 

;ly cures Slmnroaai/^n ^r !^.« " J^BI 

r C!l 

liar to women. 




lively cures suppression of men8M~(from what^ 
ever cause), and all periodical troubles ^cu- 
>wometi. A safe, reliable reinedy war- 
?*°*^*l*^Jl*'''^5 menstruation oVlnobey^?^ 
Th^^it^- ^''°"''* "«* ^ "^ durinirp^^incT 

are subject is the direct result of a disordered 
^A ^gu'ar menstruation. Bobt. SteveSon 
& Co., Chicago. lU., H. BoewaiS & O) mSi° 
waukoe Wholesale A*t«^T^TOnul^' onW 
su^pUei by Boyoe AT^>^^Bo^Xn^., 52 






HBlWUllMl 




/ 



y 



-r^r- 



• " ^ J-ij » « i - nM ' i i;«i I 



T*^ 




jr^^^i^tim 



iH-pi 



'2«_*iS 



I ■ * • 



4-t-.^ 



\ 



I ■ ■ ■■ I 




■ 



n m r t " 



i»»~-<i 



DUIiUTH EVEKTN^G TTBnffAl.n WEDNESDAY, JAKUABY 29 1890. 



NOT TO BE TIEO DOWN. 



Duluth Roads Refuse to Join 

the Western Freight 

Men's Talk. 



Chicago Roads Will Again Cut 

and Slash Rates in 

Summer. 



The Gentleman's Agreement 

All Knocked Out; 

Notes. 



ChairmaD Faithorn of the Western 

Freight association and the represent- 
atives of the Northwestern roads, who 
have been holding a conference in New 
York with the managers of the trunk 
lines, the Canadian Pacitic and the lake 
transiiortation companies relative to 
throunh rates from the seaboard to 
Northwestern points, have returned to 
Chicago. The object of the conference, 
as heretofore stattxl in The Herald, was 
to agree upoa a l>asis of through rates to 
govern both the rail and water routes 
during the season of navigation, and so 
avoid the friction and demoralization 
that prevailed last season until the Du- 
luth lines gobbled the whole of the 
traflSc. 

It was freely predictetl that the pur- 
pose for which the meeting was called 
would not be accomplished and that the 
Duluth roads would never submit to any 
of the traffic going via Chicago. They 
consider the tight settled last year. The 
meeting adjourned without taking any 
dertnite action on the matter under con- 
sideration. The reason of this was that 
the Manitoba road, the Northern Steam- 
ship company and the Eastern railway, 
controlled by James J. Hill, sent no rep- 
resentatives to the conference and main- 
tained a strict .silence as to their views 
on the questions. The St. Paul i Du- 
luth also kept aloof from the meeting. 
As these companies are the most import- 
ant factors in the Northwestern freight 
business during the summer months 
their absence could not be ignored. 

The failure of the Duluth interests to 
respond to the call is regarded as espec 
ially significant. It is generally con 
strued to mean that they have no inten 
tion of receding from the position taken 
last summer, and that they will again 
cut rates to the bone if necessary to 
prevent the Chicago lines from securing 
any portion of this through traffic from 
the seaboard to St. Paul and Minneapo- 
lis. The representatives of the Cana- 
dian Pacitic profess to be willing to enter 
into an a^rreement for the maintenance 
of rates on a reasonable basis, but. of 
course, they could not do so with the 
Eastern and the St. Paul & Duluth left 
out. AW the other interested companies 
were represented and the final upshot of 
the conference was an agreement by 
those present to submit the question of 
rates to arbitration. 

Of course this action is contingent on 
the assent of the absentees, and Chair- 
man Blanchard, who presided, was 
authorized to communicate with them 
for the purpose of obtaining their views. 
if they accept the proi«58ition another 
meeting will be called for the purpose of 
selecting arbitrators. 

A Chicago pa{)er speaking of this mat- 
ter says: "If they refuse the whole 
scheme will fall to the ground and the 
Chicago roads will know what to expect 
when lake navigation is resumed in the 
spring. Ttie majority of them are al- 
ready satisfied that no agreement will 
be reached. The ominous absence of 
the Duluth line representatives from the 
New York meeting convinced them that 
any further attempt to secure har- 
mony without surrendering everjthing 
to the Northern lake-and-rail routes will 
be useless. It is expected that the pro- 
gram of last summer '^ill be repeated. 
The Canadian Pacific and the Soo line 
will be forced to reduce rates to meet 
the competition of the Duluth boat 
lines; the Chicago, Burlington & North- 
ern will endeavor to protect its through 
business by meeting the rates of the 
Soo; the other Northwestern roads will 
reluctantly and with much grumbling 
follow in the footstepsof the Burlington; 
local rates between Chicago and St. Paul 
will be forced down in proportion as the 
through rates are cut, and the North- 
west will be fretted by the same compli- 
cations that prevailed last year." 

Id the meantime a point that the Chi- 
cago paper doesn't seem to notice, the 
traffic will all go via the Lakes and Du- 
luth. and the Chicago roads will i)erhaps 
come to the decision that the St. Paul Jc 
Duluth. Eastern and Manitoba are in the 
fight to win, and will keep on demoraliz- 
ing rates every season until the Chicago 
roads formally give up all attempt to 
secure the traffic of the Northwest. 



Another Complication for Them. 

Chicago, 111., Jan. 29. — The inter state 
Commerce Railway association, better 
known as the Gentlemans association, 
has at last reached the end of its rope. 
It received its death blow yesterday, 
formal notic-e having been given by the 
Union Pacitic and Chicago & North- 
western Railway "ompanies of their 
withdrawal. 

That the announcement of the action 
of those companies caused intense ex- 
citement is putting it mildly. All day 
presidents of the various roads in the 
association were conferring together as 
to the course to be pursued under the 
circumstances. Those who were asked 
their opinion as to what steps would 
now be taken, said they would go on 
with the association not w^ithstanding 
the action of the Northwestern and 
Union Pacific roads. 

Railway Xotes. 

The Northern Pacific mileage of 1890 
shows an increase of 170 miles over 
1889. The earnings for the third week 
in January were $2^,700, against 8263,- 
074 for 1889. For the first twenty -one 
days of this month the earnings were 
f751,018, compared with 8700,201 for the 
corresponding three weeks last year, a 
decrease of 818,183.' 



AN ACROSTIC. 



To travel, or not to travel. Is for each a ques- 
tion—but if we 
Have to ride liebind the pufliog iron horse, the 
Kxperience of all our friends advises us to 
choose "The 

Burlin^toQ," a line whose builders planned 

not a scheme 
I'topian. Hy rare tfoofl judgment guided, and 
ReudinK Ibt- sig-iis ot pn)Kre s ritfhtlv, they 
LlDktKi with bands of steel the cities chief 
In nine «real states iwe drop the metre'— 
Nebraska, Kansas, Missouri, Iowa, Minnesota, 

Colorado. WyomiuK and South Dakota. 
Goest thou a ji urney to any town in these;' 

Then 
To thy accent iiie thee, and buy thy tickets 
On "I'he BurlinKton." the finest, fastest line, 

and 
Never shalt thou have cause for vain regret. 

For rates, tickets, maps and any information, 
call on afrents of ""The Burllntfton" or con- 
necting lines, or address W. j. c. Kenyon Gen. 
Pass Agent, C. B & N. R. H.. St. Paul, Minn. 

The Herald bindery can turn out 
heavy ledgers, etc., just as you want 
them, and do the work for you promptlv 



DIVIDES THE D AMAGES. 

The Northern Steamship Company to Pay 
9SI0,000 for the Shettleld. 
A decision has been reached in the 
steamship case of the Sheffield and 
North Star, Judge Brown found both 
vessels in fault, and divided the dam- 
ages between the owners. The amount 
sued for in the case of the C. J. Sheffield 
was $176, 7W. Add to this the cost of re- 
pairing the North Star after the colli- 
sion, a trifle over 83000, and we have an 
aggregate sum of 8180,000. Thus a divi- 
sion of damages will saddle the sum of 
890,000 upon Jim Hill's Northern line 
for payment. An appeal will, of course, 
be taken, but it is doubtful if a change 
of result can be attained. The outcome 
of this trial t as been looked for with 
considerable interest. The lesson read 
to marine men, by Judge Brown, will 
not be apt to be disregarded. 

In summing up Judge Brown gives 
this account of the case: The Sheffield 
w;j8 about fifty miles off white Fish 
Point blowing her fog signal. At 4:42 
she checked half speed. While upon 
this course she heard the whistle of the 
Star on her starboard bow. She ans- 
wered with two blasts and checked. 
There was no negligence so far. The 
whistle on her starboard continued of 
one blast; whether a fog signal or a pass- 
ing signal is uncertain. This called for 
caution. Three times the Sheffiehl blew 
three blasts, and the North Star ans- 
wered with one. She ported, however, 
at the risk that it was a passing sigual. 
The Sheffield assumed what it had no 
right to assume -that it was a port sig- 
nal — and deliberately threw itself across 
the course of the Star. I have no fault 
to find with the Star until the signals of 
the Sheffield grew near. It claimed to 
be running under check, but I find great 
reason for doubting that. The North 
Star people claim that the signals of the 
Sheffield were heard only four or five 
minutes before the collision. I cannot 
believe that. I am inclined to believe 
the Star first checked down, sometime 
afterwards stopped, and when a collision 
seemed inevitable, backed. This was 
sufficient to make the Star responsible. 
The bow of the Star went five feet into 
the Sheffield, and from expert testimony 
it was determined that the speed of the 
Star was between five and seven miles 
per hour. 

THE W ATER POWER. 

Expected Developments of the St. L^iuls 
River Water Power Company. 

Some time ago The Herald made the 
statement that remarkable developments 
could be expected scon in connection 
with the improvement of the St. Louis 
river water power. And in view of ex- 
isting facts this statement can be reiter- 
ated. 

It is probable that a few days, or 
weeks, will see matters settled that will 
be of great moment in connection with 
this water power. 

Values of acreage along the St. Louis 
river, since the purchase of the West 
Duluth acreage by the Vanderbilts, 
have steadily advanced until today 
every bit of land along the river from 
this city to Fond du Lac is held at a 
stiff figure, and even at ruling prices it 
is hard to purchase. That the Northern 
Pacitic will make some costly improve- 
ments between here and Fond du Lac 
seems certain, as a gentleman now in 
the city, who recently talked with some 
of the directors of the road at New York, 
says these gentlemen would not deny 
that they had great intentions. 

Demo rest Medal Coutext, 

The Young Womens Christian Teni- 
I)erance Union of Dnluth will give a 
silver medal contest sometime in the 
near future. This contest is for the 
Demorest silver medal, which will be on 
exhibition in a few weeks, to be awarded 
to the best of ten speakers on some 
temperance or prohibition subject. All 
contestants must be under 21 years of 
age. Pieces will be furnished and com- 
petent persons will drill the contestants. 
Those wishing to enter the contest will 
please make application at once to Miss 
Annie McClements, 714 West Second 
street, chairman of committee on contest. 
All applications must be made before 
Feb. .5. 

Cleaning the Sidewalks. 

The street gang commenced clearing 
the sidewalks and crossings on Superior 
street this morning. The gang consists 
of about fifteen men, who accomplish 
about as much work as three able- bodied 
men would do with reasonable diligence. 
The weather being so mild it has not 
been necessary to purchase much ad- 
ditional clothing for them as yet. 



Around the World. 



There was a time when a man who had 
circled the globe was a nine day's won- 
der, and if dime museum managers had 
existed then, the traveled individual 
would have been exhibited as a "freak." 
Now such a voyage is so common that 
we have ceased to regard the world's cir- 
cumference of 25,000 miles as anything 
large. But distance can be measured in 
another way — by the difficulty and ex- 
pense of overcoming it. The Burlington 
system of railroads has 7000 miles of 
track. Do you realize what a lot of rails 
it would take to string out 14,000 milea 
in a single line? How much money they 
would cost? How many great cities and 
thriving towns you would pass in travel- 
ing that distance? Buy a ticket over 
the finest railrod in the West, and in- 
vestigate. For informs'tion more in de- 
tail, call on any of the Burlington agents, 
or those of connecting lines, or write to 
W. J. C. Kenvon, Gen. Pass. Agent C, 
B. & N. R R, St. Pa^l, Minn. 



Kast £nd Skatlns Rink. 

David N. Morison, champion fast 
skater of Duluth, and W. W. Brown, 
champion fast skater of Wisconsin, will 
skate three races at alxjve rink on the 
following dates for 850 a side and a gold 
medal to be given by the rink, Friday 
evening, Jan. 24th, distanf*, three miles; 
Tuesday evening, Jan. 28th, distance, 
three miles; and Thursday evening, Jan. 
30, distance, five miles, the one winning 
best two out of three races to be declared 
the winner. Judges to be selected on 
the ice. Walkers military band will be 
in attendance. 



>'ot One in Ten 



Of the people you meet from day to day 
has perfectly pure, healthy blood. The 
hereditary scrofulous taint afflicts the 
large majority of people, while many 
others acquire diseases from impure air, 
improper food and wrong indulgences 
Hence the imperative necessity for a re- 
liable blood purifier like Hood's Sarsa- 
parilla, which eradicates e.ery impur- 
ity, and gives to the blood vitality and 
health. It cures scrofula, salt rheum, 
huinors, boils, pimples, and all other af- 
fections caused by impurities or poison- 
ous germs in the blood. All that is 
asked for Hootl's Sarsaparilla is that it 
be given a fair trial. 



Smoke the Endion cigar, the finest in 
the market. W. A. Poote &, Co. 



Notice the new bargains offered in J. 
M. Root & Co.'s ad. 



Unitarian literature furnished free 
upon application at Boom D, Hunter 
block. 

For .Sale. 

A fine double corner in West Duluth; 
a great snap. Don't miss it. Apply to 

Ebicson &, Strom, 
Room 211, Pastoret-Stenaon building. 



DO CONGRATULATE WARD 



The Players League Meets in 

Secret Conclave in 

New York. 



Theatrical Managers at War; 

Some Short Notes of 

Sport. 



New York, Jan. 29.— In the main club 
room of the Fifth Avenue bote I, where 
few weeks ago the representatives of the 
new Players league were gathered to- 
gether, the leading lights of the National 
league assembleil in secret conclave at 
10 o'clock this morning. 

Representatives of all the League 
clubs were present, and although the 
representatives of the press were barred 
it was given out t hat the g ithering was 
of more than ordinary importance. 
Among the questions to be discussed is 
the one of supplying vacancies caused 
by players joining the Players league. 

\t the annual meeting of the organiza- 
tion a resolution was adopted that no 
club should engage or negotiate with 
any player belonging to any league or 
association exefept through the medium 
of a negotiation committee, which was 
appointed at this meeting. This plan, 
however, has so far failed to work, and 
the meeting of today will determine 
whether it is ijolicy to abide by it. 

In the smaller club room the arbitra- 
tion committee is wrestling with several 
questions of vital importance. One of 
these relates to the dispute between the 
representatives of the Atlantic and Nesv 
England leagues regarding the decree 
of the Hartford, Lowell and New Eng- 
land clubs to withdraw from the Atlan- 
tic association and cast their lot with 
the New Englanders. 

President Spalding, who is here, is in 
the best of spirits, and does not think 
that the organization of the Players 
league will have any material effect upon 
the old organization. In this he is sup- 
ported by President Hewitt of the Wash- 
ington team, who takes an extremely 
rosy view of the situation. 

The League meeting proper will be 
called upon to decide whether the cir- 
cuit next season shall consist of eight or 
ten clubs. In the latter case Washing- 
ton and Indianapolis will withdraw, and 
their players will be disposed of to the 
highest bidders. It is considered certain, 
however, that in this event President 
Brush of Indianapolis will put a pretty 
stiff price on his team. Interviews this 
morning with members of the League 
tend to indicate, however, that a ten 
club league will be approved, at least for 
the present season. 

Theatrical Managers at Law. 

New York, Jan. 29.— Before Master 
Blackford, at his office in Exchange 
place, additional evidence was taken 
this morning in the case of Auguslin 
Daly against William Brady of the 
"After Dark" company for infringing 
ujKjn the property rights of Daly in pre- 
senting through the East and West the 
railroad-tunnel scane in Boucicault's 
".\fter Dark." The case is attracting 
considerable attention in theatrical 
circles. 

Sport iu{; Notes. 

Columbus has arranged a number of 
exhibition ball games for early spring. 

Ball Player Charley Bennett's salary 
last season was 13500, with 81000 bonus 
signing. 

It is quite likely that the Cincinnati 
battery, Duryea and Keenan, will sign 
with the Players league, Duryea going to 
Brooklyn and Keenan to Boston. 

John Ward has secured the refusal of 
the ball park at Jacksonville,* where he 
intends to take the Brooklyn team in 
the spring. The Chicago Brotherhood 
team will play several exhibition games 
there. 

Cotton of Chicago, has been selected 
to take Billy Sexton's place in the bil- 
liard tournament to be held in New York 
and Chicago in a few weeks. 

William O'Connor of Toronto, the 
champion sculler of America, left To- 
ronto Saturday for San Francisco. He 
intends sailing from San Francisco for 
Australia within the next two weeks, 
where he hopes to get on a race with 
either Kemp or Stansbury. 

Denny and Boyle of Indianapolis, have 
gone into training to get in coniJition for 
next season's ball games. As usual in 
winter, Boyle's arm is in fine condition. 

The two foot balls which Princeton 
used in the games with Harvard and 
Yale last autumn are being handsomely 
ornamented by the Princeton Foot Ball 
association and will be kept as trophies. 
The ball used in the 1 ale game will be 
painted blue, with "1889. Yale, 10-0" in- 
scribed upon it. The one used in the 
Harvard game will be painted crimsons, 
with this inscription upon it: "1889, 
Harvard, 41 15." 

Charles H Manning, who claims the 
pool players' championship of the United 
States, in a game of pool at the Cafe 
Lenox, at Third avenue and Seventy- 
second street, last night, accomplished 
the remarkable feat of pocketing all the 
balls in five frames consecutively. His 
greatest record before was forty balls. 



Cnllen Agrain a Candidate. 

To the Editor of The Herald: 

I have been an earnest listener to the 
Evangelist Burdick for more than one 
week, and he has so thorougly convinced 
me that the pernicious habit of drinking 
IS one of the gravest crimes that a man 
can commit— a crime so grave that it can 
in no wise be measured as to the amount 
of enormity only by the graver crime of 
selling it to impoverish men, women and 
innocent children. The burning truths 
has BO burued themselves into my heart 
and soul that I want in a measure to 
atone any sins that I may have com- 
mitted in treating men heretofore and 
starting them on their downward path 
to some of the miseries that 
tlie drink habit is the father to. 
I wish through your valuable 

Eaper to now announce myself as a pro- 
ibition candidate for mayor with the 
promise to all who will give lue their 
votes if I am elected that I will use all 
means that will come within my reach to 
stamp out if possible the damning traffic. 
I will further pledge myself that if I 
cannot stamp it out of our fair Zenith 
city I will put all the impediments in 
the way of its sale that I possibly can. 
Wishing for the help and assistance in 
this good work of the Christian men and 
those who want to see our fair city re- 
deemed and make that prosperous stride 
in the commercial world that its geo- 
graphical position gives. Hoping that I 
will have the co-operation of all the 
good men in this community to stamp 
out the evil at the polls at the next elec- 
tion. Respct. Richard Cullen. 
Duluth, Jan. 29. 



For .Sale. 
West half lot 70, block 175, 3d division, 
four-roomed house on the lot; only $700, 
half cash, the remainder on your own 
terms. Apply at 211 Pastoret-Stenson 
Block. 

The Herald bindery has the best 
facilities in Duluth for making blank- 
books. 



IT 



•^^>^i^>*a 



IT"^ * M J MU1.L-M I K ' 1! ' »!■ « 



I 



WE ST EN D 

In a Political Turmoil; Some Other Mat- 
tern of News. 

Division No. 7 of the Ladies Aid so- 
ciety of the Methodist church will hold 
a valentine social at the Methodist 
church Valentine's day. The young 
lady valentines will serve an oyster sup- 
per. 

Music is furnished every night this 
week at Ericksons rink by the French 
Band. 

Thomas Craig has decided not to run 
for alderman of the Fifth ward, because 
of a trip which he is compelled to take, 
from which he will not return until 
after ele<;tion. 

The Sixth ward registered 200 more 
yesterday than it had ever done before. 
It looks as though it were going to be 
the bloody Sixth. 

H. L. Lord has had his office on Supe- 
rior street neatly repainted. 

Louis Larsen, who was in the grocery 
business at the West End some time ago, 
will reopen in the .lennings building. 

The West End Social club meeta to- 
night in Normanna hall for its regular 
dancing lesson. 

The race at Twentieth avenue rink to- 
morrow night promises to l>e interesting. 
The same ones who took part last Satur- 
day night will skate. 

D. H. Morgan, the West End flour and 
feed man, has decided to go out of busi- 
ness on the 31st inst. Mr. Morgan has 
done business for two or three years, 
and while Michigan street was in such 
bad shape was virtually shut off for 
several months. This fact, added to the 
slowness of several indebted to him, 
has induced him to suspend business. 
Under these circumstances Mr. Morgan 
will lose a large amount of money. It is 
his intention Ui pay every dollar of his 
indebtedness if it takes all he has in the 
world to do it. His many friends will 
regret to learn that he is obliged to take 
this step. 



6PERCENTI 



We have at command unlimited 
amounts of money to lend promptly 
at 6 percent on improved business 
property and 7 per cent on im- 
proved residence property. 



Loans Made on Unimproved Property. 



BUILDiNO LOANS A SPECIALTY, 

MONEY CONSTANTLY ON HAND. 
NO DELAY. 

PURCHASE MONEY MORTGAGES 
BOUGHT. 

GOOD BONOS BOUGHT. 



UyE&PRlLE, 

ROOMS 302 AND 303 

Duluth National Bank Building. 



B 



R 



O 



W 



N 



R 



O 



T 



H 



E 



R 



S 



ESTABLISHED 1882. 



Hotels, Restaufants, 



-AND- 



TAKE NOTICE I 

We are agents for the celebrated 

Green Point China 



The Best In the World. 



Get our prices and vou will be per- 
fectly BHtisfled . 



19 West Supefiof Street. 



d. D. & R. C. RAY, 

REAL ESTATE. 



ROOM "B," 



HUNTER BLOCK. 



B. C. QRIDLBY. J. C. M18HLRB 

GRIDLEY & MISHLER, 
Real Estate Brokers 

Room 36, Excbaitg-e BuUdlng. 

List your property with, us at what It Is worth 
and we will sell It. We Invite everybody to 
call la and see us. and solicit correspondence 




$8. CO ^' ^' 



"of Teeth. 



GUILUM 



Painless Dentist. 

Kocm 1-7, 40« West Superior Street, 
Fareusson Block. uulutb 



SPECIAL BARGIIIIIS. 



1 60 Acres, 


secti 


on 2-48- 1 6. 


320 " 




18-50-16. 


80 " 




12-50-16. 


160 " 




20-50-16. 


70 " 




26-50-15. 


80 " 




28-60-15. 


80 " 




27-50-15. 



Lot 2, block 30, Dodge's addition, 
$326. 

2 Lots, block 5, West End, $1050. 

We have exclusive sale of this prop- 
erty. 

LAZIER BROS., 

26 Exchange BIdg. 



NO ALUM — NO AMMONIA — NO LIME- 
NO PHOSPHATES, IN 

^CREAM 

Baking Powder 

MOST PERFECT MADE. 

Its superior excellence proven in millions of homes for more than a quarter of a 
Oenlarv. It is used by the United States Government. End"»rsed by the heads of the 
Qnat Universities as the Strongest, Purest and Most Healthful. Sold only in Cans. 

PRICE BAKING POWDER CO. 



YORK. 



CHICAGO 



ST. LOUIS. 



SAN FRANCISCO. 



MEMBERS OF THE 

DDLDTH CLEARING HOOSE ASSOCIATION. 



American Exchange Bank 
Bell &. Eyster's Bank 
First National Bank 
Security Bank of Duluth 
State Bank of Duluth 
National Bank of Commerce 
Marine Bank 



CAPITAL. 

$300,000 
100,000 

1,000,000 
100,000 
100,000 
100,000 
260,000 



SURPLUS 

$200,000 

10,000 

100,000 

25,000 



Bh 11 lie Hill 



FOR SALE: 



5fl-14--ln llcreage, 
49-15--ln beaie, 
Superior Street 
Dock Propertf, - 



- $2,500, 

1. 

- 1. 



Lots for sale as low 
as $25 each. 



APPLY TO 



R. CULLEN 



501 West Superior Street. 



NEW HOTEL. 

THE 

UraPOLlTAI 



St.^aul, Minn., 

Cor. 4tli and IVasbinfrton St«. 

On Cable Car Line. Best Table ia the Noixa 
west Itates Ja.W and Ipwards. 

W. U. Barksb. Manager. 



CHRISTIAN SCIENCE. 



FREE DISPENSARY AND READING ROOM, 
where can be found a warm and pleasant olace 
to read Christian Science literature, with 
which the table Is supplied and some one to 
answer questions and treat the sick. 302 Pas- 
toret building. Free of charge. 



DB.E.C. WESTS 



NERVE AND BRAIN TREATMENT. 

Specific for Hysteria, Dizzinesi', Fits, Neuraleia, Wake 
fulness, Mental Di'pii-ssioti, Softeninir o( the Brain, re 
^ultinu in insanity anJ leaillnir to misery <le<av ami 
ile.ith. Prem.tture Old Age.flaiTenness. Loss ot }*ovv('r 
in either sex. Involuntary Losses, and Spertnatonhcea 
.-.■iiised bv over^exertion of tlie brain, seJf-aliu.'-e or 
iverindiilgvnce. Kaoli box contains one month's ti^eat- 
ment. $1 a tiox, or six for $h, sent by mail prepaid. 
With each ortjur for six boxes, will senvl punhaser 
guarantee to rtfnncl money irthe treatment talis to 
t:ure. Uuarantees i.4saed aiul genuine sold ooljr by 

Boyco & Totnian, Phoenix Druj? Store, and 
T West Superior street, solo a^nts, Duluth, 
Minn. 



scuiLLiNG'S mmm 



Any Number of Pieces Furnished. 



ROOM (U PASIOREr-SimSOII BLOCK, 

DULUTH, • - MINN. 



CHANDLER HOTEL, 



ELY, 



MINNESOTA. 



First class In everyway. Newly refitted. 
Finest sample room Id town. Livery In 
eonnection. WILI lAM GRANT, Prop. 

Open November I. 




A LOT 



-IN- 



BLOCK 12, 





MICHIGAN STREET, 



FOR SALE 



-AT- 



Below Market Price 




BUSINESS 



I n c jj ^ ^ 




For Ladies. Special classes every after- 
noon at Parsons' Business College, sec- 
ond floor. 



m NORTHWESTERN LINE, 

C, ST. P., M. &0. R'Y. 

Take this line between St. Paul, Min- 
neapolis and Chicago, Duluth, Wash- 
burn, .Ashland aud all points on Lake 
Superior, and to Sioux City, Omaha, 
Kansas City, Denver, Spokane Palls, 
Portland, and all joints west. 

"The Northwestern Line," C, St. P., 
M. & O. R'y, will also take you to the 
wheat tields of Dakota and Minnesota, 
the corn fields of Iowa and Nebraska, to 
the Black Hills and the wonderful oil 
and coal l)earing districts of Wyoming. 

No line is so well equipped for its pas- 
senger business, or gives more attention 
to the comfort and convenience of pas- 
sengers than "The Northwestern Line," 
nor does any other line make as good and 
reliable connections East, North and 
Southwest. With tourists, land-seekers 
or imigrants, in fact with all the travel- 
ing public, "The Northwestern Line" 
stands first. 

For map folder showing the line and 
connections, call at ir)9 East Third street, 
St. Paul, :S?2 Hotel St. Louis block, Du- 
luth, 1.3 Nicollet House, Minneapolis, or 
address T. W. TEASDALE, Gen'l Psiss. 
Ag't, St. Paul, or G. M. SMII H, Gen'l 
Ag't, Duluth. 



If taken at once. 



Lot sold next this 
property for $335. 



Address 



L. o., 



m 



WANTED ! 



Purchasers for 




Tliree Valuable and Nice-Lpg Lots 



On Eighth street, near First avenue east. 



-:- WILL BE SOLO VEBY CHEAP -:- 



-ALSO- 



i 



Three Good Building Lots on Ninth Street, 



Near Third avenue east 



Alltlieseare well located and very accessible. 
Giood schools and graded streets close by. 



! 



I 



Apply by letter or in person to 



"A B F." 



Q. G. TRAPHAGEN, 

ARCHITECT, 

looms SID, S11 and i\l Duluth Union Kational Bank Building 



I 



i- 



40 



40 



-AT- 



P. V. DWYER & BROS. 

Telephone 179. 
207 WEST SUPERIOR STREET. 



Postoffice Box A A. 




R. KROJANKER, 

Manufacturer of Ladies and Gents Fine 
Furs, Sleigh Robes and Mats. 

Altering, repairing, cleaning and Jyeing all 
kinds of furs a specialty. rtT Good workma v 
ship guaranteed. 

HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR RAW FURS. 



200 East Superior Street, 



Duluth, Minn. 



IT 




^1 M 



tm^^ -^ ■ ■■ ■ I — * 



T 



<4- 
I 



■f- 



H 



* 



UUAiUTH iCVJfiWENTG HEBAIJ): \VED:N^ESDAY, JANTJARY 29, 1890. 



/ 



li 



OF 




The Course of Wheat and 

Stock Prices for the Day 

on 'Change. 



Daily Receipts; Chicago Gos- 
sip; Close; Market 
Notes. 



There was a very dull market here to- 
day, with prices unchanged from last 
night until just at the close, when there 
was a decline of ^g. The feeling was 
easier all day, both here and at other 
markets. There were no local features 
of moment. Cables were easy and dull 
and exports from the seciboard small. 
The receipts at all Western points were 
147,000 bi». 

Cash and January wheat closed as 
follows: No. 1 hard, TiK; No. 1 north- 
ern, Toij; No. 2 northern. 73, all nominal. 
May No. 1 hard opened and closed at 
82 W;. held steady until the close, when it 
sold at 8218; May No. 1 northern closed 
at 79 14; Februarj- corn closed at 28^8 
and May at 31 J2'. 

»w Directors of the Board. 

The first meeting of the new board of 
directors of the Board of Trade was held 
late Yesterday afternoon. Col. Geo. E. 
Welles was 'elected secretary for the 
ensuing vear. and F. W. Paine, treasurer. 
President Macleod app<jinted the follow- 
ing standing committees: On tinance— 
G. G. Bariium, W. Van Brunt, Franklin 
Paine; transportation— F. S. Daggett, 
Ward Ames, A. K. Shepard; harbor -A. 
D. Thomson, C. H. Graves, M. J. Forbes; 
elevators -Forbes, Shepard, Paine; tele- 
graph—Ames, F. A.Gooding, Van Brunt; 
judiciary - Graves, Barnum, Daggett; 
room and supplies— Daggett, Ames, Van 



CITY BRIEFS. 



Col. Welles was given leave of 

for sixty days and will go to 

tomorrow for medical treatment. 



Brunt; floor — Thomson, Gooding, 
Graves; meteorology— Paine, Daggett. 
Forbes. 
Totlay 
absence 
Chicago 

The DuyV Movement. 

Cars on track: Wheat 25, corn 2. 
Receipts: Wheat 3126 bu, corn 
4709 bu, oats 30,954 bu. Shipments: 
Wheat 182 bu, corn I2.90G bu. Inspei-- 
tion: Wheat. No. 1 hard 10 cars. No. 1 
Northern 9 cars, corn 9 cars, oats 35, 
total t>3. Minneapolis reported 114 
cars on track, against 150 yesterday 
and llt"> a week ago. Receipts there: 
Wheat G.3,270 bu. Shipments: Wheat 
14,000 bu, flour 13.120 bh!s. 

Chicas" Wheat. 

The following dispatches are over the 
private wires of W. W. Bill, successor to 
Pressy, Wheeler Jc Lewis: 

Wheat ha.s been dull and heavy. Thn 
opening was firm, but showed indication 
that the local scalping crowd were long 
and would like to have the market ad- 
vance. They have worked manfully to- 
day to accomplish this, but failed. Bull 
news was injected into the crowd when- 
ever possible. New York wired that 
Indian wheat wa.^t less freely offered and 
that tl e pretentions of sellers were ad- 
vanced and yet it seemed impossible to 
bull May to SOc. The trouble is the 
lack of outside support. The market 
closes weak and depressed. 

Corn, dull and featureless, the near 
futures being slightly lower on both re- 
ceipts. 

Provisions, dull. It, was evident there 
were large orders to sell May pork at 
^10.15, but the quantity sold at that 
price was not large. 

>'ew York Stocks. 

The following are closing prices on the 
New York stock exchange as reported by 
W. W. BiU & Co.: 

Toda>. 

Chicago. Burlinfrton & Qulncy. IW"* 

Amencan Conon Oil T,\ 2T\ 

Missouri Paciflc 74X '&% 

Northern Paciflc preferred 75?i 75 'a 

Chii-ago, .Mlliraukee&8t. Paul.. 70\ TO'a 

Sujrar Trust 6Ui M 

GasTrust ^'\, IS 

Louls^-ille & Nashville m\ 9(i\ 

CbivixgoSi Northwestern lll'j Ill's 

Kock I^land »6?i <r,\ 

Lake Shore ..._..IU5% lOB 

Headiuf? 39 3S> 

Tenn. c-ial and iron 86«» 88^ 

Richmond Terminal 23li 22H 

Atchison 33J4 33?» 

Delaware & Lackawanna 136 XM 

New EQgland 147 4B', 

LeadTrust 2W 22v, 

Western in Ion 85?» SSJi 

trnionPacific «l% 68', 

Wisconsin Central 3i\ 

OU 106V* 



The gospel meeting this evening at 
the Bethel will be omitted because of 
the temperance rally at the Opera house. 

Members of the Masonic Temple asso- 
ciation met Monday night, but on ac- 
count of there being no quorum, failed 
to transact any business. 

The driver of an ice wagon in attempt- 
ing to turn on Second avenue east this 
morning, dumped his load into the mid- 
dle of the road, smashed the wagon 
tongue and demoralized his own tongue 
generally. 

A large amount of bricklaying has 
been done on the Henderson building, 
opposite The Spalding, the last two or 
three days. 

Work on the interior of the Clague & 
Prindle building is progressing very 
rapidly, and it will be ready for occu- 
pancy in about a month. 

The following variations in tempera- 
ture were recorded at Pioneer Fuel com- 
pany's oflice. Hotel St. Louis: 12 m., 
20 alx)ve; 3 p. m.,.33 above; 6 p. m., 38^ 
above; 10 p. m., 32 above; 7 a. m., 29 ' 
above; 9 a. m., 28' above; 12 m., .32 
above. Maximum, 38 above. Mini- 
mum, 20' above. Daily range, 18'. 

.\ committee from West Superior was 
in Duluth toilay and visited the Board 
of Trade and the oBices of the new 
Chamber of Commerce building to obtain 
pointers to aid them in their organiza- 
tion for puttiuij up a Chamber of Com- 
merce building in that place. 

.\ hearing in the accounts of A. Miles, 
administrator <>f the estate of Fred 
Nichols, was heard before Judge of Pro- 
bate Xyer this morning. 

Alderman Kugler is running for re- 
election on the independent ticket in 
the Third ward. 

The city is being billed by "The Dark 
Secret." The paper is very artistic. 

.\ contest against Frank Carlson for 
lands in .58-18 is being heard at the land 
office today. The contest is brought 
through the report of a si)ecial agent. 

A titage has been built in Steinway 
music hall. It will be occupied by a 
concert piano. 



PERSONAL. 



SUCCESS TO HIM. 



An 



Enterprise That Should and Will 
Surely .Succee<l. 
E. C. Thurston, who has for some time 
occupied insuflicieut quarters in the little 
Jingo building in the rear of the Benz 
block has opened business in the hand- 
some new Long building, No. 7 East Su- 
perior street. 



5f ester- 
day. 
lOf* 




Mrs. Hattie Kobern, aged .32 years, 
died at St. Marys hospital of pneumonia 
day before yesterday. 

The one-day old twin boys of Mr. and 
Mrs. Olaus Kron died this morning. 

Mr. J. Crosley of North Hampton, 
Mass., who has been in the city several 
days, returned home this evening. Mr. 
Croeley has been investing considerable 
Eastern capital in Duluth realty, and 
will return with his brother next May 
with the same purpose in view. 

Mr. Neil McLachlan received a tele- 
gram this morning informing him that 
his father was dying, at his home in Fort 
Wayne, Ind. Mr. McLachlan left on 
this eve ning's train. ^~JI^) T~_ ''f?*' 

Mr. F. M.'^Tjler and sister of Syra- 
cuse, N. Y., are guests at The Spald- 
ing. 

Messrs. Benj. Ketchum and W. E. 
Graham, young Philadelphia capitalists, 
are in the city to invest in Duluth real 
estate. 

Mr. H. M. Ogilvie, who has been visit- 
ing relatives in this city for the past 
week, left this morning for his home in 
Blue Earth City. 

Mr. Eugene Hay, United States attor- 
ney, was a guest at The Spalding to- 
day. 

Kegister Resume. 

At The Spalding: W. B. Wheeler, W. 
H. Evans, W. Phlegan, George S. Os- 
trom, E. E. Hart. H. S. Brigham, P. S. 
Leech, Chicago; H. B. Bristow, F. F. 
Loomiss, T. W. Lovp St. Paul; W. E. 
Littleton, C. R McKenzie, Philadelphia; 
S. W. Huntley, St. Louis; A. Harrison, 
M. G. Hyman, A. J. Douglass, New York; 
S. M. Douglass, Milwaukee; G. Doulin, 
Detroit; E. Cohen, L. E. Weille, Buffalo; 
James M. Dloyd, Jamestown. 

At the St. liouis: J. E. Eddy, Louis- 
ville; A. D. Barnum, C. E. Darlington, 
John Watkins, Chicago; D. B.l Horton. 
New York; J. W. Stone, N. C. Krise, 
Minneapolis; H. Larson, St. Paul; Al 
Hynes, Eau Claire* 

At the Merchants: K. S. McCullough, 
Minneapalis; P. W. Smith, Marquetto; 
Charles Lundburg, Thompson; O. D. 
Packer, East Saginaw; W. J. Watkins, 
Fond du Lac, Wia 



An Klefrant Train. 
In a circular dated Jan. 2G the Du- 
luth, South Shore A Atlantic informs 
the public that, beginning Feb. 1, it will 
run between Duluth and the Sault the 
flnest Wagner cars ever built, new from 
the company's shops and modern in all 
respects. These coaches will be fitted 
with twelve sections, state room, smok- 
ing rooms, buffet, hot and cold water 
and double toilet rooms for ladies. The 
cars will reach Duluth Friday and will 
leave Duluth Saturday at 9:25 p. m. 



Chlrago Close. 

Chicaoo, Jan. 29, 1:15 p.m. 
lower January 'a\\ iVbruary, ' 
Corn, flrm; January-, 29'* ; May, 



close.— Wheat 
r>\: May. 79^,. 



To Raise Funds. 

Ihe Street Railway company is only 
waiting for the city council to give it 
permission to use Seventh avenue before 
beginning work on the cable road. 
Thomas Lowry of Minneapolis, the presi- 
dent of the company, left for New York 
this morning to float bonds for money to 
prosecute the work. The council will 
probably take action on the right-of way 
next Monday. 

District Court. 

At the district court today before 
.Judge Ensign, John Piering obtained a 
verdict of $10iX) damages against the 
Northwestern Fuel company. The jury 
were out all night. Before Judge 
Stearns the case of .Tohn Leia vs. The 
Duluth Gas & Water company was dis- 
missed on motion of the defendant after 
the plaintiff had rested, and another 
case, that of .John Matson, against the 
same company was settled before trial. 
The i.-ase of .August Reinke vs. L. H. 
Zaatrom is now on trial. It is an action 
tor damages in a piano deal. 

relA l esta te. 

A Record of the Real KstaCe Transfers for 
34 Hoars Ending; at Noon. 

J F Patten to U M Nelson, s' 3 1 2, bik 44, 
Endion fi.aoo 

WHO Elliott to C C Wleland, ne!*, ne«» 
of Be>4. i i. 4, 1S-.51-1* 4,3)1 

Frank 9chaupp to Matthias Hauf, 1 1<, 
9, blk IKi. Third ttj.-, 

W A' BiU.sion to Germauia Iron com- 
pany. 1.5, ;«MJ3-11 1 

F W Winship to H U iipencer. sw!^ 4. 
51-12 4,800 

Duncan. Brewer & Co to C N Nelson Co, 
und 4-5 in 8e»;4 of neii, and eVi of se^, 
3t-»J-lo 150 

Hiram L Kelsey (executor) to Fitz- 
gerald, ne"^4 of se"*, 18 49-16 i,aoo 

WD Lan<! company to J Ualdsworth, 1 
«. blk72, W £\ Second 300 

U Harrison to B M Musber, 1 »!, blk 18, 
Third .30,000 

W D Lau<l c<jmpany to J Fitzweraid, 1 4, 

6. blk l»i4. \V u. Fifth 1,100 

C Stalilmau Brewinjf conipany to Mur- 

nik Ik ;ikaia, I 8, blk Itt, Tower 900 

J K Myers to Nils Hokinson, 1 12. blk 3, 

West Park aoo 

E P Patterson to G Colby, 1 14, bUt »7, 

Lr>n lou 425 

A K Wulker to J W Norton, 1 23, 24, blk 

7, Superior View goO 

W t, .\i.»n to M O'Meara. 1 (J, blk 56. 1 11 

in blk «.'), Oiieotii 1,400 

W D Laud conip;iriy to L F Schmauss, I 

5, bllJ su, W D, Fourth 300 

F W I eVey to C S Dabuey. I 7. », blk 6, 

WD. First .: 1,750 

17 transfers: consideration $49,812 

A smoker dislikes a jKwr cigar worse 
than his satanic majesty hates holy 
water. If you desire a first class smoke 
call on A. M. Griffin &. Co., underneath 
First National Bank building. 



This is without question one of the 
finest rooms in the city, and perfectly 
adapted to the purpose for which it has 
been specially fitted, namely, a first-class 
chop house and restaurant. Thurston's, 
although comparatively a new institu- 
tion, has built up a most enviable repu- 
tation for its superb cuisine, 
and the excellence of its serv- 
ice. This popular cafe has 
always been extensively patronized by 
business men and all desiring a substan- 
tial, and well cooked meal, on short no- 
tice, and comprising all the delicacies of 
the season, served in the best style and 
moreover at a very reasonable price, 
should not fail to investigate this for 
themselves. 

Thurston's is u favorite resort of the 
ladies, as the best accomodations 
with absolute privacy are ensured. 
The second floor of building 
is being fitted up for a dining 
room exclusively, and will be furnished 
in the very best style. The above cut 
will give an excellent idea of the new 
building of which Thurston has taken 
posession, and now occupied by him. 

A LOCAL VIEW. 

What Oaluth Railroad Men Think of the 

Association's Fusitiun. 

Said a well-known railroad man this 
morning, speaking of the fruitless meet- 
ing of the Western TralBc association: 
"The Chicago trunk lines are foolish to 
ever suppose for one minute that the 
lake companies, and especially Jim Hill 
with his Northern Steamship company, 
would ever agree to the establishment 
of a basis of rates that would give Chi- 
cago a share of the Northwestern freight 
business. Last summer he controlled 
all this business, and the Chicago 
roads got comparatively nothing. 
If necessary, he will make the same rate 
East that is in force to Chicago, and 
could then make money out of it while 
shutting out the Windy city. Chicago 
might as well acknowledge first as last 
that Duluth holds the key to the situa- 
tion, and should make up its mind that 
Chicago is sidetracketl The lakes in 
summer and the South Shore in winter 
makes Duluth's position unassailable." 



Two More Companies, 

Articles of incorporation of the Ver- 
milion Range Lumber & Iron company 
were tiled yesterday in St. Paul. The 
capital stock in 8100,000. Levi Howland. 
Fort Howard, Wis.; Charles Lampson, 
Seymour, Wis.; Roscoe W. Gilkey and 
William J. Monohan, Green Bay, Wis., 
and Frank C. Laird of Minneapolis, are 
the incorporators. 

The Longyear Mesabi Land and Iron 
company, which was mentioned this 
morning as a new organization, is com- 
posed of Michigan people entirely and 
was organized June 27, 1887. The or- 
ganization and the appointment of R. N. 
Marble as the Duluth resident represen- 
tative was published in all the Duluth 
papers in May, 1888. 



Masonic Notice. 

There will be a special communication 
of Palestine lodge No. 79, A. F. & A. M., 
this evening at 7:.30 sharp. Business of 
importance to the craft. J. H. Lo<iiK, 
Secretary. 



IN WAR D THE FIRST. 

The Situation There as it Looks; The Re- 
publican Candidates. 

While public interest seems to center 
in the candidates for the mayoralty the 
fact should not be ignored that there 
are aldermen to be elected. One of the 
most densely populated wards in the 
city — the First — has been represented by 
James Dingwall and Charles A. Beattie, 
the latter having been selected by the 
council to fill the unexpired term of Asa 
Dailey, and fulfilled the duties of the 
oflice for eight months in a very credit- 
able manner. Mr. Dingwall has just 
completed his two years' term and his 
record is one which he has no reason to 
be ashamed of. Both gentleman are 
stalwart republicans, and con- 
sistent members of that party. 
Mr. Dingwall is eminently 

qualihed for the duties of the 
council room. He is a successful busi- 
ness man, has a large acquaintance not 
only in his wanl but throughout the 
city, and possesses the confidence of all 
who have business dealings with him. 

The democrats have al-'o put candi- 
dates in the field against Messrs. Ding- 
wall and Beattie. These are Thomas 
Timlin and M. Sorenson. It is not sup- 
posed for a moment that either can be 
elected. There are too many republican 
votes in the ward for one thing; and 
for another reason the voters in 
the First ward have no reason to 
make a change of alderman as long as 
James Dingwall and Charles Beattie 
perform their duty as conscientiously 
during the coming term as they have 
done in the past. When the votes are 
counted it will be found that the repub- 
lican candidates will be returned by a 
generous majority. And that such may 
be the case will not be regarded a calam- 
ity by the residents of the First ward of 
no matter what political faith. Their 
interests will be conserved just as faith- 
fully, as though all were of the same 
party. A vote for Dingwall and Beattie 
will never be regretted. 

That Mr. Dingwall represented his 
constituents faithfully may be inferred 
from the fact that the interests of the 
First ward have been faithfully kept by 
him. Mr. Beattie is not behind in this 
respect. Mr. Dingwall succeeded in get- 
ting St. Liouis avenue opened, got 
the water mains laid on St. 
Croix avenue, was instrumental 
in getting sidewalks built on Lake ave- 
nue, also introduced a resolution that 
St. Croix avenue be graded. This would 
have been done in the fall, but was too 
late, and work will be commenced in the 
spring as early as possible. He was in 
line with the rest of the council 
against building railroad tracks on St. 
Croix avenue. This was aftar Mr. Dailey 
had introduced a resolution that the 
tracks be built, and was defeated, Mr. 
Dingwall working actively against the 
building of the tracks. The foregoing 
are a few of the principal matters in 
which the alderman was especially act- 
tive. A vote for Dingwall and Beattie 
will be a vote for two true friends of the 
First ward. 



Hateful Blood Relations. 

Hateful kindred are those sprung from 
the parent stem— malaria. They are 
chills and fever, bilious remittent fever, 
dumb ague and ague cake. These fees 
to bodily peace are all blrxxi relations, as 
there is no doubt that these endemic 
complaints are produced by contamina- 
tion of the blood by the miasmata exist- 
ent in both air and water in malarious 
regions. Hostetter's Stomach Bitters 
expels from the blood the virus with 
which miasma infects, but it does more 
than this, it neutralizes the atmospheric 
and aqueous poison and its germs before 
they have permanently fructified in the 
system, and thus effectually protects 
against it the fierce inroads of this dia- 
bolic brotherhood of diseases. Thus it 
is not only a remedy, but also a prevent 
ive, prompt in relieving, laeting in effect, 
perfectly efticient. Nervousness, billious- 
ness, dyspepsia and kidney trouble also 
succumb to it. 



Highest of all in Leavening Power.— U. & GoVt Report, Aug. 17, tS8j^ 




BeJting 
Pomler 



ABSdJUTElIir PURE 



COME AND SEE US! 



It will pay you! Never before in Duluth have you had the 

opportunity to buy 

Fine Hats and Men's Furnishings 

At such low prices as we are quoting this week, NECKTIES! 
See our east window— full of the best. All to close out. 

KILGORE & SIEWERT 

ST. LOUIS HOTEL BLOCK, DULUTH. 
Store closes at 6:30 P. M. 

L O A NS M A D E 

6 AND 7 PER CENT. 

MONEY ON H^ND-NO r)ELA.Y. 

JONES -:-&-:- BR ACE, 

Real Estate and Loans, 
409 FIRST NATIONAL BANK BLDG. 



KEEP RIGHT ON GUESSING. 



Seventy-five Dollars Cash to 

Closest Guessers on 

Duluth. 



Two Prizes Offered for the 

Contest; from Now to 

May. 



[Notice that all city letters put in the 
Duluth poetoffice must have two cents 
prepaid, otherwise The Herald will not 
receive the guesses, for it will not pay 
postage on "guess" letters.! 

How many inhabitants nas Duluth ? 
That is a question for the readers of The 
Herald to answer. By "Duluth" is meant 
the city proi)er. West Duluth, Lakeside 
and Lester Park, all to all intents and 
puriKJses parts of the city. 

The Herald proposes to make it an 
object for its readers to guess as to the 
number of people in the city and the 
three adjoining suburbs mentioned 
above. In brief. The Herald will offer 
prizes to the two persons guessing the 
number or nearest the number of 
inhabitant49 shown by the returns 
of the census enumerators. The Herald 
will give to such successful guessers two 
cash prizes. 

First Prize $;>0 in Gold, Second Prize $2.5 
in Gold. 

Guesses will be received at this office 
until the day when the enumerators of 
the census begin their work. 



PKR FUEL CO,, 



WKATUKK FtlRKCAHT. 

Jan. 28. — Forecast for Duluth and 
vicii'ity for 24 bourn comniencin<j 10 a.vi. 
today : colder ; fair weather. 

Observer, Signal Office. 



CROSS CREEK LEHIGH, 

FREE RURNING, 

ANTHRACIIE & BIIUMINOOS, 




Dry IMapIe, 

Hard Mixed, 

Slabs, 

Kdgini^H. 



COIIIELLSyiLLE 
Aoij GUS HOUSE 



Population Contest Coupon. 

My guess as to the number of Inhabitants 
in Dulutb. West Duiuth. Lakwide and 
Lester Park to be shown by returns of the 
census enumerators in the summer of IWO 
is as follows: 
Whole number of InhabltantH — 



: Name of gruesser — 



Residence of gueaser— 



Date, Jan. 89, 1800. 



Cut out this couixin, make your guess upon 
It and send it to The Daily Herald. All guesses 
must Ih.' made on this coupon. Only one gueis 
allowed to a single i-oupori, but you can buy as 
many papers as you want, day after day, and 
guess on the couiwns therein contained as 
often as you please. In ease there sbal 
be two or more answers of the same uuintier. 
which number is nearest or next to nearest 
that returned by the enumerators, then the 
winners shall be. In either case, the ones whose 
coupons bear the earliest date. 

Address all answers to 

•'Guess " care The Dally Herald, 
Duluth, Mitm. 



oeoEBS peoMPTLy delivered 

TO ANY PART OF THE CITY 



Office: Hotel St. Louis, 326 W. Superior St. 



YARD: 

Superior Street and 
Third ave. east. 



DOCK: 

Qarfield Avenur 
Rices Point. 



Certificate of Amended Arti- 
cles of Incorporation of the 
Duluth Incline Railway Com- 
pany. 



M. >r Serve as a Guide, 

In order to give data that is of Interest and 
may bo of value. The Herald reprint* the toi- 
iuwing from the dlrect<jry report ot 1889, but 
it must be remembered that this paper does 
not vouch for th*; accuracy of the opinions set 
forth or the flirures given. lu fact it will be 
well to recollect that the ordinary directory 
figures and estimates are most alway8Cpa<lded 
sometimes fearfully, and must usually be 
scaled down very materially. These are the 
directory statements: 

This volume contains 3,30U more names than 
the last issue; a total of Ifi.iUl adult citizens of 
Duluth; this sum uiultlplicd by 'Z^, the factor 
which has been found to truthfully represent 
the women ana children not included in the 
list. Indicates a population of 4(i,lS20 for Du- 
luth, a gain of H),iM) inhabitants within a year, 
ami the prediction is veulured that ff a lull, 
tonuilete and accurate count t>e made by ex- 
i>erieuced and competent canvassers, nearly 
bO.OUO souls will be found within the corpo- 
rate limits of Duluth in 1890. 

Population by Years. 

18.'0. United States census 3,*70 

lK<o, state census 18,000 

1886, directory estimate 22,000 

1887, directory estimate 30,000 

188M, directory estimate 37,000 

188H, directory estimate 47,900 



UNION DEPOT TIME TABLE. 



SUPERIOR TO DULCTB. 



Daily 

Except Sunday... 

Dally 

Except Sunday... 
Except Sunday... 

Dally 

Dally 

Oally 

Except Sunday... 

Dally 

Dally 

Dally 

Daily 

Except Sunday. . . 

Daily 

Except Sunday. . . 



Leave Iieave 
Superior W. Sup'r 



TOO am 

8*10 am 
»25am 

10 45 am 

11 05 am 

12 35 pm 

1 45 pm 

2 50 pm 

4 05 pm 

5 06 pm 



tf 10 pm 

7 20 pm 

11 46 pm 



6 46 am 

7 07 am 

7 40 am 

8 17 am 
932 am 

10 66 am 

II 16 am 

I^42pm 

152 pm 

3 00 pm 

4 16 pm 
512 pm 
niOpm 

6 17 pm 

7 30 pm 
1162 pm 



Arrive 
Duiuth 

7 05 am 
723 am 

7 55 am 

8 35 am 

9 48 am 
11 10 am 
11.30 am 

lOOpm 
a 07 pm 

3 15 pm 

4 30 pm 
6 30 pm 
8 25 pm 

6 35 pm 

7 46 pa. 
1210 am 



STATE OF MlN,NESOTA, i 
County or St. Lodib. » 

KNOW ALL MEN BY THESE PRESENTS. 
That we. Jacob K. Mvers, president, and 
Benjamin F. Myers, secretary of the Duluth 
Incline Hallway Company .organized and doing 
business under the laws of the State of Minne- 
sota, t)eing duly and severally sworn, do beroby 
certify and depose that, at a regular uiceliiig 
of the boartl of directors of the Duiuth Incline 
Hallway (k>mpany,held at the company's oflice 
in the Board of Trade building. Duluth, Minne- 
sota, on the sixth (ti) day of November, ISM), at 
ten (10) o'clock in the forenoon, it was resolved 
that the name of the Duluth Incline Hallway 
Company be changed >^o the Duluth Belt Line 
Railway Conipany.and that Article "1" (one) of 
the Articles of Imorp )ratiou of the Duluth 
Incline Itaiiway Con p ny be changed and 
amended l)y inserting therein the words, "Du- 
iuth Belt Line Railway Company." in lieu and 
stead of the words, "Duiuth Incline Hallway 
Company, "so that the said article shall read iis 
follows : 

ARTICLE 1. 

The corporate name of the corporation shall 
be "Duiuth Belt Line Railway Corauany." Tlie 
general nature of its business shall be to sur- 
vey, locate, construct, equip, maiutain, oper- 
ate and run a railway, with one or more trucks 
or linos of road, with all necessary side tracks, 
turn-outs, branch lines and ail nec-cssary ma- 
chine 8ho|>s, wartliouses, storeiiouses, eleva- 
tors, deiMjts, station houses, factories, build- 
ings, structures, right of way, depot grounds, 
lands and appurtenances nei-essary or con- 
venient for the e<4uipment, management and 
o(>eratiou of such railway, which shall com- 
mence at a point within theiiiuitsof the vill- 
age of West Duluth. in the county of Saint 
Louis and State of Minnesota, and run in a 
general northwesterly direialou to a point In 
the northeast quarter of section eleven (11) 
township forty-nine (49) north of range fiftoen 
(1.5) west of the fourth (4th) principal meridian 
in said county of Saint Louis and State of 
Minnesota. The principal place of transacting 
business of the corporation shall be at Duluth, 
in the C«uuty of Saint Louis in the state of 
Minnesota. 

Signed, 

Jacob H. Mverk. 

Bknjami.n F. Myers, President. 

Secretary. 

Subscribed and sworn to before me this I6th 
day of January, 1890. 

S. M. Chandlrr, 

Notary Public, 
[Notarial seal] St. Louis County, Minn. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, i 

DEP-\RTMENT OK STATE, f 

I hereby certify that the within instrument 
was Hied for record in this oltice on the 17th 
day of January, A. D. 1890, at II o'clock a. m., 
and was duly recorded In Book Y of incorpora- 
tion on page 297. 

H. Mattson, 

Secretary of State. 



St. Paal ft DnInth Railroad. 



-? 



OB "^ 
Bo B9 



» eave Duluth.... SOOam 2 10 pm 1000pm 

Arrive St. Paul... 2 30 pm 6|56 pm 6 66 am 

Ar MInneaiiolls.. 2 66 pm 7 20 pm 7 15 am 

.^r Stillwater 330pm 706pm 700am 

.\r Milwaukee.... 4 15 am 646am +705pm 

Ar Chicago 7t:o*m 9aOamtt700pm 

ArSt. Louis 605pm 60epm am 

Ar KatiKis CUy^^ 4 45 pm 4 4<'» pm 8 46 am 

♦Except Sunday— to other pointe dally. 



B 
of 

r 



58 



I 



!? 



I Bx Sunday 



Leave liuluth 1046am 



Leave West Superior.. 

Leave Superior 

Arrive Stillwater 

Arrive St. Paul.. 

Arrive Minneapolis 



II 10 am 

1130 am 

6 32 pm 

eoopm 

6 40 pm 



Dally. 



lOOOpm 
10 25 pm 
I0 3&pm 
rOJam 
666 am > 
7 85 am 



OFFICK OF RKOISTER OF DEKDS. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA, ( „ 
County OF St. Louis, f""' 

I hereby certify that the within amended 
article was tiled in this ofllco for record on the 
30th day of January, A. D. 1890, at 4 o'clock p. 
m.. and was duly recorded In Hook E of Mis- 
cellaneous, page 144, 

Amos Shkphard, 

Register of Deeds. 
By J. A. SwANSON, 

Deputy. 



HARWOOD'S 

Cit) Transportation Freight and Express, 

DBAYS. 

Office, 17 First Avenue WeeU 




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OOB GfiDIT SfflflCE SIILE 

Will continue .Fifteen Days— until stock is re- 
duced. Cost or worth cuts no figure. WE 
MUST RED JOE, even at a great loss. 
Our lo'W prices have caused us to meet with 
unqualified success in this, "The Greatest Sale 
of our Business Existence." Space will not allow 
us to quote prices on our entire stock; besides, 
you -would not stop to read them, but will quote 
a few to give you an idea. 

$7.49 buys an elegant Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least 6> i 5. 

$9.47 buys an Otter Fur-trimmed Overcoat, 
worth at least S» I 8. 

The same niductions on all our Overcoats, 
Suits, Boys' Suits, Children's Suits, Underwear, 
Furnishing Goods. No reserve We must reduce 
our stock at least $5-5,000 (thirty-five thousand 
dollars.) Mild weather leaves us overstocked 
and compels us to take the loss. Call and see 
our prices. 

M. S. IJURROWS & CO. 







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ARIICUS OF IliCORPOeAIIQII 



— OF THE- 



DULUTH REALT! INVESTMENT 



ASSOCIATION. 



In order to hec-onie a corpiiration under and 
by virtue of the laws of t ho .State ot .M innesola 
in such case made mid yn'ovidcd, the under- 
signed have adopte<l and executetl the follow- 
articlesof incorporation: 

AIOTCLE 1. 

The Dame of this cori>oratlon shall be the 
Duluth Itealty Investmenl Ass>K'lat!on, and its 
principal plu<MM)f biiHliieKH shall be In the city 
of Duluth. MinucMjta. 

ARTICLE II. 

Thefe -ral uatiiie of its business and object 
shall be o,- '•>«•. owning, improving, selling, 
leasing and doaltng in lands, tenements, hered- 
itunients and such otiior bii(?iueBS as naturally 
pt rtaius to its principal object aforesaid. 

ARTICLE III. 

This corporation shall begin on February the 
first, 1800, and shall continue thirty years. 

ARTICLE IV. 

The amount of the capital stock of the cor- 
poration shall be one hundred thousand dol- 
lars, divided into five thousand shares of twen- 
ty dollars each, to lie paid in monthly install- 
ments of fifty cents per share and at such 
times and under such regulations as may be 
pre8cribe<l by the by-laws; but said association 
may transact business and go into operation 
when one tliousanri shares shall have been sub- 
scrilietl for and taken. The Board of Direcuirs 
shall have power to issue said shares from time 
to time as they may decide by resolution. 

ARTICLE v. 

The highest amount of indebtedness which 
said association shall at any time incur shall 
be fifty thousand dollars. 

ARTICLE VI. 

The nauies and places of residence of the In- 
ct>rporator8 of the sal, 1 association are as fol- 
lows: 

Samuel C. Ma.xwell. Duluth, Minn. 

Simon Clark. Duluth, Minn. 

William S. All>ertson, Duluth, Minn. 

John K. Shaw. Duluth, Minu. 

Samuel T. llarri.-ioii, Duluth, Minn. 

Robert Crombie, Duluth, .Minn 

Alexander M. Morrison, Duluth, Minn. 

Zadok H. Austin, Duluth, Minn. 

ARTItXE VII. 

The goverilVient of this association shall Ih? 
vested iu a Board of eight Diix-ctorsaud the fo! 
hiwing otlitM.'rs to iH' chosou by the said U»ard 
of dlrecU)rs from among themselves; l*resi- 
dent, vice-pr»>sideiu, secretary, treasurt-r and 
attorney. Tlie terms of office of such otUivrs 
shall be e<^uai to tlieir terms as diriH-tors. The 
l>oard of directors shall Ik- dividiil into tbrtt- 
classi's. the first, two. and the sot\)nd and 
third Classes, thriH! each. The term of othiv of 
the first class sliall Ih* one year; the seitmd. 
two years; and the third, tlirtv years. I'pon 
theexplrathm of Ihe ternisof any of the dl- 
n-ctors tlieir successors shall l>e electeil for a 
tt'iui of three years 1)V the sttH-kliolders at a 
regular annua* ineetiiig. The Uoanl of l>irtvt- 
ors shall have full power to transact and tnau- 
agc tlie alTuirs of said corporation; iuniosing 
reasoiuililc tines, fees, assessments ami dues 
upon its nienil)ers; regulating tlie subscrip- 
tion, issue, and transfer of st<K'k and the man- 
agement and investment of Its funds. If they 
deem it advisable they may, by rt>solution, re- 
•luire two <lollars to U' paiil as the first install- 
ment on each share of stock subscribed for and 
taken iu the first eeries. And if they dci-iii it 
advisable they may in similar manner re<iulre 
twodollars on eaih share to be paid iis the lirst 
installiiicnt for any subseiiueiit series. The 
following named persons shall constitute the 
first Board of Directors: 
First Class— 

Zadok H . Austin, 
Robert Crombie. 
Second Class- 
Simon Clark, 
William S. Albertson, 
Samuel C. Maxwell. 
Tlilrd Class- 
Alexander M. Morrison, 
Samuel T. Harrison, 
John K. Shaw. 

And until their successors shall have quali- 
fied the following named persons shall be the 
officers of this association: 
President, John K, Shaw. 
Vice-president, Samuel C. Maxwell. 
Si'crotary, Zadok H. Austin. 
Treasurer, Robert Crombie. 
Attorney, Samuel T. Harrison. 
Other meetings of the stockholders may be 
held at such time and place as may be pre- 
scribed by the by-laws. 

In witness whereof we have hereunto set our 
hands and seals this, fifteenth day of January 
A. D., 1890. 
In presence of 

G. F..M.4.CKENZIK, witness. 
A. F. Wilson, witness. 

Samuel C. Maxwell [Seal. 
Simon Clauk [Seal. 

William S. Albbktson [Seal. 
John K. Shaw [Seal. 

Samuel T. Harrison [Seal. 
Robert Crombie Seal 

A. M. Moriso.n Seal 



REALTy SNAPS! 



NO SUCH 



BARGAINS 




Are to be found among 



ulluth Real Estate 




ACBEAGE - IN - WEST - 





-AND THE 



EAST -:- END. 



■n 




Zadok H. Austin 



[Seal.' 



Lots in West Duluth 



That are unheard of bargains. 





ACREAGE -:- 





CITY SCAVENGER'S OFFiCE 



17 First Avenue West. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, (.„. 

CocNTV OF St. Louis, l*" 

On tliis inth day of January. 1«)0, before me 
personally appeaivd Samuel T.Mavwcll, Simon 
Clark, William S. Albertsou, John K. Shaw, 
Samuel T. Harrison, Robert Crombie, A. M. 
Morrison, Zadok H. Austin, to me well known 
to be the per.sons wiioexecuted the foregoing 
instrument and eaoli Bcknowledge<i that tlioy 
executed the same as their f i-oe act and deed. 
[SEAL.] OeoRCE F. Mackenzie, 

Notary Public, St. Ixiuis County. Minn. 



OFFICE OF KKGISTKK OF DEEDS. 

STATE OF MINNESOTA. |_ 
County or St, Loitis. f **■ 

I hereby certify that the within articles were 
filed In this oflice for record on the I7th day of 
January, A. D. INK), at « o'clock a. m., and 
was duly recorded in Book E of Miscellaneous 
page 140. 

Ahob Shephard, 
Rogisterof Deeds. 
By J. A. SWANSON, 
Deputy. 



STATE OF MINNESOTA, I 
Department o» State. \ 
I hereby certify that the witliln instrument 
was filed for rt>oord in this offloe on tlie a^th 
dayof Januarv A. D. IWtO, at Jt o'clock a. 
m., and was duly recorded In book Y of iooor- 
porations on page 3%. 

H. Mattson, 
Secretary of State. 



That cannot be excelled by any agent in 

the city. 



ADDRESS 





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